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NEWS
July 12, 1990 | By Steve Edgcumbe, Special to The Inquirer
The Willistown Board of Supervisors has revised township law governing offices that are in homes. The board voted, 3-0, at its meeting Tuesday to adopt a new home office ordinance that permits a home office for a physician, dentist, lawyer, architect, engineer, accountant, public official, artist or tutor. Any other proposed use must be reviewed and approved by the Zoning Hearing Board. And the office must be within the dwelling unit only; not in a garage or other building. The new ordinance also stipulates: No more than one home office is permitted for each dwelling unit.
NEWS
February 1, 2013
IF YOU'RE WORKING on your 2012 tax return, you probably aren't in the mood to consider changes that await you next year. Nonetheless, the IRS wants to hear from you now about something that it's going to implement this year that could affect the return you file in 2014. The agency recently announced a streamlined option for claiming a home-office deduction. You have a chance to comment on this new option, and your suggestions could help improve the change for tax year 2014 and later, the IRS says.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: I'm moving out of my home office so we can rent out that room. I work from home - and there's a perfect out-of-the-way corner in the living room where I can see out the window. The problem is, my other roommates are already complaining about the ugly cables and junk under my desk. What ideas do you have for me? - C.E. A: As you probably know, a very common issue with home office spaces is all the clutter that accumulates. It's amazing how much paper ends up on my desk at home and at my office, as well as the amount of cords and supplies that tag along with even a laptop computer - and you certainly don't want that in your living room.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | by John McCalla, For the Daily News
Wear pajamas. Kick back on a recliner during conference calls. Play with the dogs on your break. These are some of the options for the work-at-home crowd, whose growing numbers have pushed the home-office concept well beyond the kitchen table of yesteryear. More than 8 million Americans work from home, according to telecommuting trade associations, and the numbers are growing. Some say as many as 30 million full- and part-time businesses operate from home. Add to that people who do at least some work at home, and there's a whole lotta e-mailing going on. This growing market demands a more sophisticated home work space.
REAL_ESTATE
November 5, 1995 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Remember the old television series Lost in Space? Well, until recently, Len and Ellan Bernstein were lost without space. They needed an area in their Bala Cynwyd house large enough to accommodate Ellan's full-time law practice and Len's after-hours legal work. Their two children, Mathew, 5, and Suzanne, 11 months, eventually would use the same space for homework and playing computer games. Since buying their 30-year-old, four-bedroom Colonial two years ago, "I'd been making do with an old, poorly functioning desk in the corner of a guest room," Ellan Bernstein said.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
At Interboro High School in 1966, John C. Hess was a starter on an All-Delaware County football team and in 1970 a starting tailback on the Princeton University team. "He was an incredible athlete," said Keith Lambie, owner of a surgical distribution firm who met Mr. Hess in Cape May in 1981. He often served as a crew member on Lambie's 30-foot sailboat, he said, once making it from Chesapeake Bay to Martha's Vineyard. After Mr. Hess - at 6-foot-5 and 240 pounds - was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease in 2006, "he lived to come to Cape May," where Lambie and his family resided.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
The CEO relinquishes power, changes compensation to a "badge" system of rewards for skills, and has "governance" sessions in place of daily meetings. Welcome to the trademarked workplace known as Holacracy. Zappos.com founder Tony Hsieh embraced the Holacracy ethic so deeply that last month the online shoe company executive asked all employees to adopt it, or leave with pay. And 86 percent of Zappos employees stayed. Notable departures included the company's chief technology officer; vice presidents of customer service, human resources, and recruiting; and Alexis Gonzales-Black, who co-led the transition to Holacracy.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | By Linda Bennett, Special to The Inquirer
Janice Drennan's alarm clock buzzes each morning at 7. She gets up, feeds the cat, makes breakfast, showers, dresses, sees her daughter to the school bus and heads to work. It's a familiar routine, one that is played out in households across the country on weekday mornings. The only difference is that Drennan's "commute" to work is just a half- dozen steps - the distance between her kitchen and the spare bedroom that she uses as an office. A Little Rock, Ark., freelance writer and graphic designer who contracts with advertising agencies, Drennan is one of an estimated 38.4 million American adults who now earn some or all of their living by working at home.
REAL_ESTATE
June 28, 1998 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
For most Americans, the home office has become a necessity. However, many apparently can't afford the kinds of work space they want or need. "Cost does seem to be an overwhelming issue," said Charles Ansert, vice president of Spector Development Co. in Swedesboro, "especially when you consider that many people are working at home just to pay the mortgage. " According to a 1997 study by Emerging Technologies Research Group in Washington, 52 million Americans work at home in some capacity, and more than 11 million telecommute from a home office at least one day per month.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1994 | By Lara Wozniak, FOR THE INQUIRER
Linda Sayre's office used to be her dining room table. She's expanded, branched out to accommodate her growing client list. Now she works from the dining room table and a roll-top desk. "Before, I had an organized mess," explains the Doylestown loan officer. "As long as nobody touched the piles of papers, I'd find things. I had a sort of mental picture of where everything was. Somewhere along the line, I lost the picture. " But she found Linda Anderson's 2-by-3-inch business card in a copy and resume store in Doylestown.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: I'm moving out of my home office so we can rent out that room. I work from home - and there's a perfect out-of-the-way corner in the living room where I can see out the window. The problem is, my other roommates are already complaining about the ugly cables and junk under my desk. What ideas do you have for me? - C.E. A: As you probably know, a very common issue with home office spaces is all the clutter that accumulates. It's amazing how much paper ends up on my desk at home and at my office, as well as the amount of cords and supplies that tag along with even a laptop computer - and you certainly don't want that in your living room.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
At Interboro High School in 1966, John C. Hess was a starter on an All-Delaware County football team and in 1970 a starting tailback on the Princeton University team. "He was an incredible athlete," said Keith Lambie, owner of a surgical distribution firm who met Mr. Hess in Cape May in 1981. He often served as a crew member on Lambie's 30-foot sailboat, he said, once making it from Chesapeake Bay to Martha's Vineyard. After Mr. Hess - at 6-foot-5 and 240 pounds - was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease in 2006, "he lived to come to Cape May," where Lambie and his family resided.
SPORTS
December 16, 2015
CHICAGO - There have been so many instances to define this horrible 76ers season, such as losing nine games in which they had a fourth-quarter lead and being embarrassed in a 51-point home loss to the San Antonio Spurs. Few may be as eye-opening, or frustrating, as Monday night's second and third quarters against the Chicago Bulls. In the second quarter at the United Center, the Sixers might have put forth their best 12 minutes of the season. They made 16 of 25 shots, with 10 of those baskets coming on assists, and scored 37 points to take a 56-51 halftime advantage.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2015
Q: I recently read your article in Costco Connections magazine: "Make your bedroom feel like a five-star hotel room. " I enjoyed your take on making it a getaway from other functions, so I'm trying to move any home office-related items out to accomplish that. In the meantime, I'm making one of my spare bedrooms into an office and could use some advice on wall color and decor. My hope is to buy a cherry or walnut desk with matching credenza, a lateral file cabinet, and possibly a bookcase or small bar. - SM A: I'm so glad you enjoyed the article.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Int. Kathleen Kane's Scranton home office. March 2014. Across a large desk, lies a newspaper: "KANE SHUT DOWN STING THAT SNARED CITY POLS," the Inquirer headline blares. Enter political operative. Political operative (pleading): "Kathleen, don't make a mountain of a molehill. You're a star. Put your head down; take the hit. Two weeks, it's all a memory. " Camera zooms in. Kane (pounding the desk): "This is war. " Opening credits roll: Kane's War. Forgive my descent into B-movie script writing, but that's how the details of this Kathleen Kane saga read.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
The CEO relinquishes power, changes compensation to a "badge" system of rewards for skills, and has "governance" sessions in place of daily meetings. Welcome to the trademarked workplace known as Holacracy. Zappos.com founder Tony Hsieh embraced the Holacracy ethic so deeply that last month the online shoe company executive asked all employees to adopt it, or leave with pay. And 86 percent of Zappos employees stayed. Notable departures included the company's chief technology officer; vice presidents of customer service, human resources, and recruiting; and Alexis Gonzales-Black, who co-led the transition to Holacracy.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester E. Smith, 90, of Chestnut Hill, a family physician for more than 50 years, died Friday, May 1, at home of complications from leukemia. In 1959, Dr. Smith opened a home office on East Willow Grove Avenue in Chestnut Hill. He continued seeing patients as a solo practitioner well into his 80s. When his patients could not get to his medical office, he made house calls or visited them in assisted-living facilities. "He was one of a dying breed of doctors," his family said in a tribute.
NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
A counselor from Upper Gwynedd Township has been charged with inappropriately touching a teenage client, Montgomery County officials announced Tuesday. Bernard Rivas, 73, is charged with touching a 14-year-old girl during counseling sessions at his home. Rivas is a licensed counselor who sees clients in his home office and specializes in working with teens in crisis, according to Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman. Upper Gwynedd police received a complaint in February that Rivas had touched a 14-year-old girl who was one of his counseling clients.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a courtroom exchange worthy of prime-time TV, a Bucks County prosecutor on Wednesday pummeled Don Tollefson with questions about why his charity paid for his home's lawn care, a trip to the dentist, and his dogs' grooming. The former sportscaster, on trial for fraud, gave an explanation for every expense and at one point accused prosecutor Matt Weintraub of rolling his eyes at the answers. Tollefson contended that he was reimbursing himself after using his personal bank account to cover costs for his Winning Ways charity, which helps poor children.
REAL_ESTATE
November 24, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
When Debbie and Bob Fleischman were considering where they might live as young marrieds, they surveyed the entire East Coast, looking for a city with vibrancy and culture - and a home in that city that was within walking distance of a synagogue. The couple, who met as Yale undergraduates, live Judaism fully and joyfully, and when they chose Philadelphia as their hometown in 1984, they also became affiliated with Beth Zion-Beth Israel Synagogue in Center City. Predictably, their first home was on Addison Street, near the synagogue.
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