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NEWS
July 12, 1990 | By Steve Edgcumbe, Special to The Inquirer
The Willistown Board of Supervisors has revised township law governing offices that are in homes. The board voted, 3-0, at its meeting Tuesday to adopt a new home office ordinance that permits a home office for a physician, dentist, lawyer, architect, engineer, accountant, public official, artist or tutor. Any other proposed use must be reviewed and approved by the Zoning Hearing Board. And the office must be within the dwelling unit only; not in a garage or other building. The new ordinance also stipulates: No more than one home office is permitted for each dwelling unit.
NEWS
February 1, 2013
IF YOU'RE WORKING on your 2012 tax return, you probably aren't in the mood to consider changes that await you next year. Nonetheless, the IRS wants to hear from you now about something that it's going to implement this year that could affect the return you file in 2014. The agency recently announced a streamlined option for claiming a home-office deduction. You have a chance to comment on this new option, and your suggestions could help improve the change for tax year 2014 and later, the IRS says.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | by John McCalla, For the Daily News
Wear pajamas. Kick back on a recliner during conference calls. Play with the dogs on your break. These are some of the options for the work-at-home crowd, whose growing numbers have pushed the home-office concept well beyond the kitchen table of yesteryear. More than 8 million Americans work from home, according to telecommuting trade associations, and the numbers are growing. Some say as many as 30 million full- and part-time businesses operate from home. Add to that people who do at least some work at home, and there's a whole lotta e-mailing going on. This growing market demands a more sophisticated home work space.
REAL_ESTATE
November 5, 1995 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Remember the old television series Lost in Space? Well, until recently, Len and Ellan Bernstein were lost without space. They needed an area in their Bala Cynwyd house large enough to accommodate Ellan's full-time law practice and Len's after-hours legal work. Their two children, Mathew, 5, and Suzanne, 11 months, eventually would use the same space for homework and playing computer games. Since buying their 30-year-old, four-bedroom Colonial two years ago, "I'd been making do with an old, poorly functioning desk in the corner of a guest room," Ellan Bernstein said.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
The CEO relinquishes power, changes compensation to a "badge" system of rewards for skills, and has "governance" sessions in place of daily meetings. Welcome to the trademarked workplace known as Holacracy. Zappos.com founder Tony Hsieh embraced the Holacracy ethic so deeply that last month the online shoe company executive asked all employees to adopt it, or leave with pay. And 86 percent of Zappos employees stayed. Notable departures included the company's chief technology officer; vice presidents of customer service, human resources, and recruiting; and Alexis Gonzales-Black, who co-led the transition to Holacracy.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a courtroom exchange worthy of prime-time TV, a Bucks County prosecutor on Wednesday pummeled Don Tollefson with questions about why his charity paid for his home's lawn care, a trip to the dentist, and his dogs' grooming. The former sportscaster, on trial for fraud, gave an explanation for every expense and at one point accused prosecutor Matt Weintraub of rolling his eyes at the answers. Tollefson contended that he was reimbursing himself after using his personal bank account to cover costs for his Winning Ways charity, which helps poor children.
NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
A counselor from Upper Gwynedd Township has been charged with inappropriately touching a teenage client, Montgomery County officials announced Tuesday. Bernard Rivas, 73, is charged with touching a 14-year-old girl during counseling sessions at his home. Rivas is a licensed counselor who sees clients in his home office and specializes in working with teens in crisis, according to Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman. Upper Gwynedd police received a complaint in February that Rivas had touched a 14-year-old girl who was one of his counseling clients.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | By Linda Bennett, Special to The Inquirer
Janice Drennan's alarm clock buzzes each morning at 7. She gets up, feeds the cat, makes breakfast, showers, dresses, sees her daughter to the school bus and heads to work. It's a familiar routine, one that is played out in households across the country on weekday mornings. The only difference is that Drennan's "commute" to work is just a half- dozen steps - the distance between her kitchen and the spare bedroom that she uses as an office. A Little Rock, Ark., freelance writer and graphic designer who contracts with advertising agencies, Drennan is one of an estimated 38.4 million American adults who now earn some or all of their living by working at home.
REAL_ESTATE
June 28, 1998 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
For most Americans, the home office has become a necessity. However, many apparently can't afford the kinds of work space they want or need. "Cost does seem to be an overwhelming issue," said Charles Ansert, vice president of Spector Development Co. in Swedesboro, "especially when you consider that many people are working at home just to pay the mortgage. " According to a 1997 study by Emerging Technologies Research Group in Washington, 52 million Americans work at home in some capacity, and more than 11 million telecommute from a home office at least one day per month.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1994 | By Lara Wozniak, FOR THE INQUIRER
Linda Sayre's office used to be her dining room table. She's expanded, branched out to accommodate her growing client list. Now she works from the dining room table and a roll-top desk. "Before, I had an organized mess," explains the Doylestown loan officer. "As long as nobody touched the piles of papers, I'd find things. I had a sort of mental picture of where everything was. Somewhere along the line, I lost the picture. " But she found Linda Anderson's 2-by-3-inch business card in a copy and resume store in Doylestown.
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BUSINESS
June 10, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
The CEO relinquishes power, changes compensation to a "badge" system of rewards for skills, and has "governance" sessions in place of daily meetings. Welcome to the trademarked workplace known as Holacracy. Zappos.com founder Tony Hsieh embraced the Holacracy ethic so deeply that last month the online shoe company executive asked all employees to adopt it, or leave with pay. And 86 percent of Zappos employees stayed. Notable departures included the company's chief technology officer; vice presidents of customer service, human resources, and recruiting; and Alexis Gonzales-Black, who co-led the transition to Holacracy.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester E. Smith, 90, of Chestnut Hill, a family physician for more than 50 years, died Friday, May 1, at home of complications from leukemia. In 1959, Dr. Smith opened a home office on East Willow Grove Avenue in Chestnut Hill. He continued seeing patients as a solo practitioner well into his 80s. When his patients could not get to his medical office, he made house calls or visited them in assisted-living facilities. "He was one of a dying breed of doctors," his family said in a tribute.
NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
A counselor from Upper Gwynedd Township has been charged with inappropriately touching a teenage client, Montgomery County officials announced Tuesday. Bernard Rivas, 73, is charged with touching a 14-year-old girl during counseling sessions at his home. Rivas is a licensed counselor who sees clients in his home office and specializes in working with teens in crisis, according to Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman. Upper Gwynedd police received a complaint in February that Rivas had touched a 14-year-old girl who was one of his counseling clients.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a courtroom exchange worthy of prime-time TV, a Bucks County prosecutor on Wednesday pummeled Don Tollefson with questions about why his charity paid for his home's lawn care, a trip to the dentist, and his dogs' grooming. The former sportscaster, on trial for fraud, gave an explanation for every expense and at one point accused prosecutor Matt Weintraub of rolling his eyes at the answers. Tollefson contended that he was reimbursing himself after using his personal bank account to cover costs for his Winning Ways charity, which helps poor children.
REAL_ESTATE
November 24, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
When Debbie and Bob Fleischman were considering where they might live as young marrieds, they surveyed the entire East Coast, looking for a city with vibrancy and culture - and a home in that city that was within walking distance of a synagogue. The couple, who met as Yale undergraduates, live Judaism fully and joyfully, and when they chose Philadelphia as their hometown in 1984, they also became affiliated with Beth Zion-Beth Israel Synagogue in Center City. Predictably, their first home was on Addison Street, near the synagogue.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
D. Scott Kelley, 72, of Bryn Mawr, a lawyer who managed the trusts and estates of clients as a sole practitioner for nearly 50 years, died Saturday, July 13, of heart disease at Penn Presbyterian Hospital. From 1976 on, Mr. Kelley worked from a home office. He enjoyed researching the fine points of the law and developing ongoing relationships with his clients. "Mr. Kelley greatly assisted our family when our parents became unable to care for themselves. My brother and I owe Mr. Kelley much gratitude for all he did during those very difficult years.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013
D EAR ABBY: My partner of 12 years and I are well-educated, successful career men. Every few months my mom comes to visit. The last few visits were not so great. We caught Mom snooping in our bedroom and our home office. When we confronted her, she got upset and stormed out of the room in tears. We recently had some renovations done to the house that included locks on our bedroom and office doors. When neither of us is home, the doors stay locked. Nothing was said about it during Mom's last visit, but last week we received a note from her telling us not to come for our usual summer visit.
NEWS
June 7, 2013
DEAR HARRY: I work as a sales rep for a company based in Chicago. We have no local office, so I work from home in a converted storage closet that's about 10 feet by 9 feet. I have my company's laptop and my desk and chair there, period. I have never claimed any of my expenses for this office on my 1040. I just did not want to get involved in a hassle with Uncle Sam, because I understand that a home-office deduction is a flag for them to audit me. The guy who prepared my 2012 return told me that he thinks that the IRS is going to have some alternative to listing those expenses for a home-expenses automobile (something like the per-mile auto allowance)
NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 79-year-old Lansdowne doctor known for his civic involvement has been arrested and charged with selling prescription drugs from his home office. Lenwood Boyer Wert of the 200 block of North Lansdowne Avenue prescribed Oxycodone and other painkillers on a cash-only basis, Delaware County District Attorney Jack Whelan said. "Dr. Wert is no different than a drug dealer standing on the corner. In fact, he's worse because he's operating under the guise of a medical professional," Whelan said at a news conference to announce the arrest.
NEWS
February 1, 2013
IF YOU'RE WORKING on your 2012 tax return, you probably aren't in the mood to consider changes that await you next year. Nonetheless, the IRS wants to hear from you now about something that it's going to implement this year that could affect the return you file in 2014. The agency recently announced a streamlined option for claiming a home-office deduction. You have a chance to comment on this new option, and your suggestions could help improve the change for tax year 2014 and later, the IRS says.
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