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Home Office

ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Sometimes, when guests step inside the Washington Square condominium of Gail Caskey Winkler and her husband, Roger Moss, there's a classic double-take moment. Past the typical 1960s architecture in the building's public spaces, a sudden sense of grandeur grabs you - all the way from antiquity forward. In the vestibule, a classic black-and-white patterned floor of marble and granite, rests a first-century B.C. amphora, a carrying vessel that looks its age. But on a wall nearby is an unmistakably modern steel sculpture.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | BY MIKE ROYKO
It just snaps together?" I asked the salesman, pointing at the floor model of a simple plastic desk, just big enough to hold a computer and keyboard, a cup of coffee, a sweet roll, some note paper and a telephone - the tools of my trade. "Right," the salesman said. "Just snap it together or unsnap it to take it apart. " "It doesn't have bolts, screws or anything like that?" "Oh, no, it's real easy the way they make these things nowadays. Sell lots of them. " Real easy.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Caroline Tiger, FOR THE INQUIRER
As with all great love stories, Bobbie Ann Tilkens-Fisher and Matthew Fisher found their dream home when they weren't even looking. The couple were happy living in their Northern Liberties rowhouse until they visited Bobbie's family in Wisconsin for the December 2008 holidays. Cocktails at an acquaintance's midcentury house piqued Bobbie's interest: What would it be like to live in one, and are there any in Philadelphia? Back East she went searching, eventually finding the website Modern Homes Philadelphia, run by real estate agent Craig Wakefield, which hosts listings plus resources to learn about the history and significant players behind the region's considerable inventory of midcentury homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013
D EAR ABBY: My partner of 12 years and I are well-educated, successful career men. Every few months my mom comes to visit. The last few visits were not so great. We caught Mom snooping in our bedroom and our home office. When we confronted her, she got upset and stormed out of the room in tears. We recently had some renovations done to the house that included locks on our bedroom and office doors. When neither of us is home, the doors stay locked. Nothing was said about it during Mom's last visit, but last week we received a note from her telling us not to come for our usual summer visit.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele and Inquirer Staff Writer
Francis R. Coyne, 80, a lawyer and former executive at what is now the Magee Rehabilitation unit of Jefferson Health Systems, died Friday, May 25, of kidney failure at his home in Drexel Hill. Mr. Coyne was executive vice president at Magee from 1978 to 1992, chief operating officer there from 1980 to 1992, and director of development from 1990 to 1992, his son Francis R. Jr. said in a Tuesday phone interview. "He was an advocate of patients' rights and the Americans With Disabilities Act," his son said.
NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 79-year-old Lansdowne doctor known for his civic involvement has been arrested and charged with selling prescription drugs from his home office. Lenwood Boyer Wert of the 200 block of North Lansdowne Avenue prescribed Oxycodone and other painkillers on a cash-only basis, Delaware County District Attorney Jack Whelan said. "Dr. Wert is no different than a drug dealer standing on the corner. In fact, he's worse because he's operating under the guise of a medical professional," Whelan said at a news conference to announce the arrest.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
D. Scott Kelley, 72, of Bryn Mawr, a lawyer who managed the trusts and estates of clients as a sole practitioner for nearly 50 years, died Saturday, July 13, of heart disease at Penn Presbyterian Hospital. From 1976 on, Mr. Kelley worked from a home office. He enjoyed researching the fine points of the law and developing ongoing relationships with his clients. "Mr. Kelley greatly assisted our family when our parents became unable to care for themselves. My brother and I owe Mr. Kelley much gratitude for all he did during those very difficult years.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | Emily Mendell is head of communications for the National Venture Capital Association and the co-founder of www.mothersofbrothers.com
The e-mail arrived in the late afternoon of March 30. The subject line read: INVITATION. It looked like spam and I was about to delete it, but something caught my eye in the preview window. A seal of some sort. The White House. Like any registered voter, I receive e-mails all the time from Barack, Michelle, Joe, and Jill. This was different. I wasn't being asked to donate or host a gathering in my home. I was invited to their home, for a signing of the JOBS Act. I reacted in a manner consistent with the maturity and grace I have cultivated in my 43 years of life.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When did fact checking get so sexy? I arrived home the other night to catch Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert going on about the rising class of sharpshooters who aim to separate substance from spin. The factcheckstapo, Colbert called them, as he dismissed those who balked at a few things Paul Ryan told the GOP convention in Tampa. Stewart, for his part, accused the entire Fourth Estate of falling down on the essential job. "When did fact checking and journalism go their separate ways?"
LIVING
June 14, 1996 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Interior designer Steven Weixler had long lived in spacious pre-World War II apartments when he decided to buy a small one-bedroom apartment in a newer building in Philadelphia. The two main rooms of the 850-square-foot apartment, the bedroom and living room, were not only tiny, but the biggest window and a balcony were located in the bedroom. The arrangement didn't suit Weixler's furniture, particularly his favorite large oil painting and a valuable English Regency table. "I didn't want to give them up or to cram them into small rooms," Weixler said.
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