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NEWS
April 29, 2012 | Emily Mendell is head of communications for the National Venture Capital Association and the co-founder of www.mothersofbrothers.com
The e-mail arrived in the late afternoon of March 30. The subject line read: INVITATION. It looked like spam and I was about to delete it, but something caught my eye in the preview window. A seal of some sort. The White House. Like any registered voter, I receive e-mails all the time from Barack, Michelle, Joe, and Jill. This was different. I wasn't being asked to donate or host a gathering in my home. I was invited to their home, for a signing of the JOBS Act. I reacted in a manner consistent with the maturity and grace I have cultivated in my 43 years of life.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester E. Smith, 90, of Chestnut Hill, a family physician for more than 50 years, died Friday, May 1, at home of complications from leukemia. In 1959, Dr. Smith opened a home office on East Willow Grove Avenue in Chestnut Hill. He continued seeing patients as a solo practitioner well into his 80s. When his patients could not get to his medical office, he made house calls or visited them in assisted-living facilities. "He was one of a dying breed of doctors," his family said in a tribute.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When did fact checking get so sexy? I arrived home the other night to catch Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert going on about the rising class of sharpshooters who aim to separate substance from spin. The factcheckstapo, Colbert called them, as he dismissed those who balked at a few things Paul Ryan told the GOP convention in Tampa. Stewart, for his part, accused the entire Fourth Estate of falling down on the essential job. "When did fact checking and journalism go their separate ways?"
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Sometimes, when guests step inside the Washington Square condominium of Gail Caskey Winkler and her husband, Roger Moss, there's a classic double-take moment. Past the typical 1960s architecture in the building's public spaces, a sudden sense of grandeur grabs you - all the way from antiquity forward. In the vestibule, a classic black-and-white patterned floor of marble and granite, rests a first-century B.C. amphora, a carrying vessel that looks its age. But on a wall nearby is an unmistakably modern steel sculpture.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Caroline Tiger, FOR THE INQUIRER
As with all great love stories, Bobbie Ann Tilkens-Fisher and Matthew Fisher found their dream home when they weren't even looking. The couple were happy living in their Northern Liberties rowhouse until they visited Bobbie's family in Wisconsin for the December 2008 holidays. Cocktails at an acquaintance's midcentury house piqued Bobbie's interest: What would it be like to live in one, and are there any in Philadelphia? Back East she went searching, eventually finding the website Modern Homes Philadelphia, run by real estate agent Craig Wakefield, which hosts listings plus resources to learn about the history and significant players behind the region's considerable inventory of midcentury homes.
LIVING
June 14, 1996 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Interior designer Steven Weixler had long lived in spacious pre-World War II apartments when he decided to buy a small one-bedroom apartment in a newer building in Philadelphia. The two main rooms of the 850-square-foot apartment, the bedroom and living room, were not only tiny, but the biggest window and a balcony were located in the bedroom. The arrangement didn't suit Weixler's furniture, particularly his favorite large oil painting and a valuable English Regency table. "I didn't want to give them up or to cram them into small rooms," Weixler said.
NEWS
May 31, 1987 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
The Warminster Township Zoning Hearing Board has granted a request by psychologist Robert J. Berchick to build a single-family home and office at Street Road and School House Lane. In approving an exception and a front-yard variance at a meeting Wednesday night, the board stipulated that Berchick must build at least 50 feet from the curb line and 40 feet from the School House Lane right-of-way. Berchick, who plans to move to Warminster from Bensalem, said the entrance to his office would face Street Road and the entrance to his home would face School House Lane.
LIVING
January 24, 1997 | By Dylan Landis, FOR THE INQUIRER
Some folks have a short commute - about 10 seconds. That's how long it takes me to carry a mug of coffee from the kitchen to the office, a 13-foot-long slab of desktop that sprawls along my bedroom windows. Thirteen feet: Sounds like a surplus. In truth, I'm getting crowded out by papers, files, slides, stray Lego pieces, three towers of books, one stubborn nest of electrical cords, and a computer, printer, fax and phone. Worse, blinds block my view all day because of the melting southern sun. Not very well planned, was it?
NEWS
June 7, 2013
DEAR HARRY: I work as a sales rep for a company based in Chicago. We have no local office, so I work from home in a converted storage closet that's about 10 feet by 9 feet. I have my company's laptop and my desk and chair there, period. I have never claimed any of my expenses for this office on my 1040. I just did not want to get involved in a hassle with Uncle Sam, because I understand that a home-office deduction is a flag for them to audit me. The guy who prepared my 2012 return told me that he thinks that the IRS is going to have some alternative to listing those expenses for a home-expenses automobile (something like the per-mile auto allowance)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1988 | By Dan Gutman, Special to The Inquirer
The high-tech industry seems to have an unlimited capacity to dream up new products for state-of-the-art consumers to buy, and this month has produced enough gadgets to fill a hard disk. The home office is hot and getting hotter, as these new products show: Canon has added three new low-cost copiers to its line, the PC-3, 5 and 5L; prices range from $745 to $1,095. Ricoh has three new compact fax machines, the FAX10E, 20E and 60E. All include the newly accepted CCITT error-correction mode.
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