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LIVING
November 5, 1999 | By Diane Goldsmith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Home offices have been springing up in every room of the house - even sharing the living room, as families increasingly find togetherness around the computer. Now, with the advent of the affordable PC, there's even more of a push to find accommodations for the technology. "The $500-and-under-PC this Christmas will open up the market like never before for less-affluent people who haven't bought one," said Ray Allegrezza, editor of SoHo Today, the small-office/home-office furniture journal.
NEWS
September 3, 1999 | By Barbara Boyer, Dwight Ott, and Emilie Lounsberry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A U.S. District judge decided yesterday that he would not unseal records that show why federal authorities raided the home and office of Camden Mayor Milton Milan as part of a widening federal corruption investigation of the city. Judge Robert Kugler's ruling came after a two-hour hearing in Camden in which attorneys for The Inquirer, the Courier-Post and Milan argued that records under seal should be open to the public. Search warrants for the mayor's house, a personal computer and his City Hall office have been released.
NEWS
August 27, 1999 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
This was one police raid Milton Milan wasn't invited to. The flamboyant 37-year-old mayor of Camden, who has been known to accompany cops on raids and arrests in his impovershed city of 87,000, yesterday found himself the target of a criminal investigation. FBI and IRS agents, accompanied by local police and a drug-sniffing dog from the county sheriff's department, descended on Milan's office in City Hall and his recently remodeled three-story home in East Camden early yesterday morning armed with search warrants.
NEWS
August 27, 1999 | This article was written by Inquirer staff writer Emilie Lounsberry based on reporting by her and staff writers Barbara Boyer, Dwight Ott, John Way Jennings and George Anastasia
Law enforcement authorities investigating corruption in Camden raided the home and City Hall office of Mayor Milton Milan yesterday in what his defense attorney said was a search for evidence of extortion, fraud and other crimes. "It's tough to tell what the FBI and the U.S. Attorney's Office have on their minds, but whatever it is, we will deal with it," said criminal defense lawyer Edwin J. Jacobs Jr., who said Milan had just retained him. Jacobs said the search warrant sought evidence of extortion, fraud in public property, mail fraud, tax fraud, conspiracy and interstate transportation in aid of racketeering, and listed the names of about 25 people and companies that have come up during the inquiry.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | By Andrew Rice, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Haverford residents responded to a mail survey asking them what should become of the Haverford State Hospital site, they saw public walking trails, bike paths, a swimming pool and playing fields. Then developers were asked to outline their visions. They looked at the 239-acre site and saw office buildings, hotels and homes. This is the divide - between residents and developers, parkland and office parks, bucolic dreams and concrete reality - that the Haverford Authority must bridge in the coming months as it attempts to determine what will become of the township's last large tract of open space.
NEWS
June 18, 1999 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The Gizmo: Siemens Gigaset 2420 Ghz Cordless Communication System. $399 for two-line desk station with integrated answering machine and speaker phone, plus one cordless handset with charging unit. Additional cordless handsets are $129 and chargers are $19.95. Why we care: There's never been a home and home-office phone system as versatile and easy to install as Siemens Gigaset 2420. One base station can work with up to eight cordless handsets - sharing two phone lines (and separate answering machine files)
LIVING
March 26, 1999 | By Maggie Galehouse, FOR THE INQUIRER
National Clutter Awareness Week is drawing to a close. You might have missed it. Perhaps you hadn't heard. Or perhaps the note you wrote to yourself, reminding you to tidy up your office-basement-playroom, has drowned in a sea of papers on a chair somewhere, never to surface again. (It might be in the same place as the memo telling you about Organize Your Home Office Day. That made its annual appearance Tuesday.) Recent reports in the Wall Street Journal and elsewhere indicate that the average executive in the United States spends more time retrieving misplaced papers from messy desks and files than most people get for their annual vacation: five weeks a year.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1999 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Traveling north, Walton Avenue in Mount Laurel is a bumpy dirt road running past a cornfield and toward the new $32 million Okidata corporate headquarters. There, the road abruptly changes to asphalt and quickly empties onto Route 38. This scene - unpaved road in farmland giving way to gleaming, low-slung corporate office - is the image of a secluded, bucolic setting that executives like to find when they hunt for new office locations in suburbia. Indeed, Dennis Flanagan, the president of Okidata, relocated the 600-employee computer printer company from its previous Mount Laurel location, about four miles away, hoping to escape mounting traffic congestion in that part of town.
NEWS
December 22, 1998 | By Jack Brown, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Jain family was always a little bit isolated from others in their small suburban neighborhood, but they say that separateness never really mattered to them until this summer. That was when Ramesh Jain, a 61-year-old real-estate broker, decided to shift his home office from one part of his house to an addition he had recently built and to put a small wooden sign next to the door. The sign was only one square foot, but to his neighbors it loomed large. "It was probably a mistake to bother, but we decided to ask the zoning board for a variance to put the sign there," he said.
NEWS
October 26, 1998 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
While many businesspeople worry about computers and the year 2000, Gretchen Edwards gets anxious about people in the year 2015 and beyond. Edwards, who is the head of Interior Design Inc., based in Telford, says that while people are living longer, they will not necessarily live better. Getting around becomes more difficult, and not enough homes and buildings are constructed with that in mind. After studying nursing and then art and design, Edwards married and raised a family.
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