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Home Office

NEWS
July 15, 1999 | By Andrew Rice, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Haverford residents responded to a mail survey asking them what should become of the Haverford State Hospital site, they saw public walking trails, bike paths, a swimming pool and playing fields. Then developers were asked to outline their visions. They looked at the 239-acre site and saw office buildings, hotels and homes. This is the divide - between residents and developers, parkland and office parks, bucolic dreams and concrete reality - that the Haverford Authority must bridge in the coming months as it attempts to determine what will become of the township's last large tract of open space.
NEWS
June 18, 1999 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The Gizmo: Siemens Gigaset 2420 Ghz Cordless Communication System. $399 for two-line desk station with integrated answering machine and speaker phone, plus one cordless handset with charging unit. Additional cordless handsets are $129 and chargers are $19.95. Why we care: There's never been a home and home-office phone system as versatile and easy to install as Siemens Gigaset 2420. One base station can work with up to eight cordless handsets - sharing two phone lines (and separate answering machine files)
LIVING
March 26, 1999 | By Maggie Galehouse, FOR THE INQUIRER
National Clutter Awareness Week is drawing to a close. You might have missed it. Perhaps you hadn't heard. Or perhaps the note you wrote to yourself, reminding you to tidy up your office-basement-playroom, has drowned in a sea of papers on a chair somewhere, never to surface again. (It might be in the same place as the memo telling you about Organize Your Home Office Day. That made its annual appearance Tuesday.) Recent reports in the Wall Street Journal and elsewhere indicate that the average executive in the United States spends more time retrieving misplaced papers from messy desks and files than most people get for their annual vacation: five weeks a year.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1999 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Traveling north, Walton Avenue in Mount Laurel is a bumpy dirt road running past a cornfield and toward the new $32 million Okidata corporate headquarters. There, the road abruptly changes to asphalt and quickly empties onto Route 38. This scene - unpaved road in farmland giving way to gleaming, low-slung corporate office - is the image of a secluded, bucolic setting that executives like to find when they hunt for new office locations in suburbia. Indeed, Dennis Flanagan, the president of Okidata, relocated the 600-employee computer printer company from its previous Mount Laurel location, about four miles away, hoping to escape mounting traffic congestion in that part of town.
NEWS
December 22, 1998 | By Jack Brown, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Jain family was always a little bit isolated from others in their small suburban neighborhood, but they say that separateness never really mattered to them until this summer. That was when Ramesh Jain, a 61-year-old real-estate broker, decided to shift his home office from one part of his house to an addition he had recently built and to put a small wooden sign next to the door. The sign was only one square foot, but to his neighbors it loomed large. "It was probably a mistake to bother, but we decided to ask the zoning board for a variance to put the sign there," he said.
NEWS
October 26, 1998 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
While many businesspeople worry about computers and the year 2000, Gretchen Edwards gets anxious about people in the year 2015 and beyond. Edwards, who is the head of Interior Design Inc., based in Telford, says that while people are living longer, they will not necessarily live better. Getting around becomes more difficult, and not enough homes and buildings are constructed with that in mind. After studying nursing and then art and design, Edwards married and raised a family.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | by Lew Sichelman, For the Daily News
Is the trend toward home offices overblown? Are rooms dedicated entirely to work the biggest waste of space since the advent of the living room? You decide. In its first-ever look at home-based businesses, the Labor Department has found that about 6 percent of all households - 6.1 million, to be exact - operated businesses out of their residences last year. But running a business out of your house is one thing; working at home is something else. For example, the Labor Department said the workweek of self-employed people averages only about 23 hours.
REAL_ESTATE
June 28, 1998 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
For most Americans, the home office has become a necessity. However, many apparently can't afford the kinds of work space they want or need. "Cost does seem to be an overwhelming issue," said Charles Ansert, vice president of Spector Development Co. in Swedesboro, "especially when you consider that many people are working at home just to pay the mortgage. " According to a 1997 study by Emerging Technologies Research Group in Washington, 52 million Americans work at home in some capacity, and more than 11 million telecommute from a home office at least one day per month.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | by John McCalla, For the Daily News
Wear pajamas. Kick back on a recliner during conference calls. Play with the dogs on your break. These are some of the options for the work-at-home crowd, whose growing numbers have pushed the home-office concept well beyond the kitchen table of yesteryear. More than 8 million Americans work from home, according to telecommuting trade associations, and the numbers are growing. Some say as many as 30 million full- and part-time businesses operate from home. Add to that people who do at least some work at home, and there's a whole lotta e-mailing going on. This growing market demands a more sophisticated home work space.
NEWS
March 1, 1998 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Picture this: You are a computer consultant who spends your days sitting in front of a computer, logged on to the Internet, talking to your clients on the phone, and using electronic databases to crunch numbers. You are a one-person operation. You are your own boss. You own your business. And you work out of your home. Sounds familiar enough. So, where's the catch? It is this: Working out of your home is illegal in Gloucester Township. With more people telecommuting and operating small consulting-type businesses from their homes, borough officials believe this prohibition is out of step with work trends.
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