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NEWS
April 25, 2001 | By Sally Friedman
My best friend has an office in a sleek, modern building in Cherry Hill with a sensibly large desk, lots of shelves, an ergonomically correct chair that's good for her back, and a wonderful secretary who sees to her paper chases. I have an old farm table that was seized like some pirate's booty at a yard sale 20 years ago and that occupies a corner of our family room. My "secretary" is an answering machine that works well in good weather, but seizes when it's damp, kind of like its owner's lower back.
REAL_ESTATE
January 28, 2001 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
You like your neighborhood, your community and the school district - but not your house. Built in the 1950s or 1960s, it lacks the charm of an older house and the amenities of a newer one. What do you do? One answer is to remodel - keeping that suburban tract house, but creating spaces such as family rooms, home offices and state-of-the-art kitchens like the ones you see in new houses. According to Larry DiCicco Jr., a Cherry Hill contractor, transforming '50s and '60s houses into more modern residences is a growing part of his eight-year-old business.
NEWS
December 7, 2000
In August 1999, the Clinton administration floated a scary proposal: Police should be granted the power to break into suspects' homes or offices to disable security on computers, phones and other devices to crack tough cases. Good thing the resulting uproar from Congress, civil libertarians and the media dealt the idea a seemingly fatal blow. The plan raised the specter of widespread black-bag operations, leading the American Civil Liberties Union to dub it "one of the most extraordinary assertions of law enforcement power since Watergate.
NEWS
September 11, 2000 | By Wendy Ginsberg, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Walking into Tim C. Kearns' at-home office, it doesn't appear to be the headquarters for a business that could become a competitor in the global market. A barefoot Kearns, 36, expertly navigates his toy-ridden Medford home and heads upstairs to the computer that serves as his company's hub. But as president of Frontier Interactive, a marketing company, Kearns is more cosmopolitan than his khaki pants and golf shirt portray. He recently opened a branch office in Barcelona, Spain, expanding his operation into a trans-Atlantic marketing firm - even though he added only one more name to his on the payroll.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Among the few outsiders working in the Philadelphia Police Department, there is probably no one more outside than Gordon Wasserman. Consider this: The Canadian-born Wasserman was a Rhodes scholar, an economics instructor at Oxford, a cabinet aide to British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, and an international consultant who has advised the governments of Turkey and South Africa. Not the sort of fellow one expects to occupy a desk at Police Headquarters. But there he is, looking ridiculously young for someone who is 61, just down the hall from Commissioner John F. Timoney, who hired him as a full-time consultant for police science and technology.
LIVING
November 5, 1999 | By Diane Goldsmith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Home offices have been springing up in every room of the house - even sharing the living room, as families increasingly find togetherness around the computer. Now, with the advent of the affordable PC, there's even more of a push to find accommodations for the technology. "The $500-and-under-PC this Christmas will open up the market like never before for less-affluent people who haven't bought one," said Ray Allegrezza, editor of SoHo Today, the small-office/home-office furniture journal.
NEWS
September 3, 1999 | By Barbara Boyer, Dwight Ott, and Emilie Lounsberry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A U.S. District judge decided yesterday that he would not unseal records that show why federal authorities raided the home and office of Camden Mayor Milton Milan as part of a widening federal corruption investigation of the city. Judge Robert Kugler's ruling came after a two-hour hearing in Camden in which attorneys for The Inquirer, the Courier-Post and Milan argued that records under seal should be open to the public. Search warrants for the mayor's house, a personal computer and his City Hall office have been released.
NEWS
August 27, 1999 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
This was one police raid Milton Milan wasn't invited to. The flamboyant 37-year-old mayor of Camden, who has been known to accompany cops on raids and arrests in his impovershed city of 87,000, yesterday found himself the target of a criminal investigation. FBI and IRS agents, accompanied by local police and a drug-sniffing dog from the county sheriff's department, descended on Milan's office in City Hall and his recently remodeled three-story home in East Camden early yesterday morning armed with search warrants.
NEWS
August 27, 1999 | This article was written by Inquirer staff writer Emilie Lounsberry based on reporting by her and staff writers Barbara Boyer, Dwight Ott, John Way Jennings and George Anastasia
Law enforcement authorities investigating corruption in Camden raided the home and City Hall office of Mayor Milton Milan yesterday in what his defense attorney said was a search for evidence of extortion, fraud and other crimes. "It's tough to tell what the FBI and the U.S. Attorney's Office have on their minds, but whatever it is, we will deal with it," said criminal defense lawyer Edwin J. Jacobs Jr., who said Milan had just retained him. Jacobs said the search warrant sought evidence of extortion, fraud in public property, mail fraud, tax fraud, conspiracy and interstate transportation in aid of racketeering, and listed the names of about 25 people and companies that have come up during the inquiry.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | By Andrew Rice, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Haverford residents responded to a mail survey asking them what should become of the Haverford State Hospital site, they saw public walking trails, bike paths, a swimming pool and playing fields. Then developers were asked to outline their visions. They looked at the 239-acre site and saw office buildings, hotels and homes. This is the divide - between residents and developers, parkland and office parks, bucolic dreams and concrete reality - that the Haverford Authority must bridge in the coming months as it attempts to determine what will become of the township's last large tract of open space.
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