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Home Repairs

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NEWS
July 5, 1990 | By John Corcoran, Special to The Inquirer
The Delaware County Office of Consumer Affairs has issued a warning to consumers to be on the alert when contracting for home repairs. The office received 73 complaints of shoddy workmanship by the end of May, most concerning roof repair or replacement. Consumer affairs officials have been frustrated in attempts to get restitution for consumers in cases of bad or incomplete work, director Evelyn Yancoskie said. Getting legal authorities involved has proved difficult because it is hard to determine whether work was necessary once it has been completed, she said.
NEWS
February 25, 2011 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Staff Writer
In May 2002, after Michael and Crystal Rocke were married on the beach in Hawaii, Michael carried his bride over the threshold of their Overbrook home. The gesture was unforgettable - and so, unfortunately, was the house. The roof leaked, nails protruded from the warped floors, the walls were dingy. Spiders were everywhere. "It was like the movie Arachnophobia ," says Crystal. "I literally cried for about eight months. For me, it was like the sitcom Green Acres , except we were living in the city of Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 27, 1992 | by Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Mabel Smith never read the classic novel "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. " Now, she probably doesn't want to. She's had enough of trees. One grows through her house. Its intrusion has led the city to declare her home an imminent danger and ordered her to leave until she repairs it. Experts point to a sprawling Paulownia tree next door as the root of the problem. The tree is on a property that was abandoned a couple of years ago after being purchased from the city in 1987. But the city explains that when that root stretched over to Smith's property, it became her problem.
NEWS
February 25, 1994 | By Bridget Mount, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When the McLaughlins moved into their rental home at 215 Woodland Ave. in late October, they expected to make a few repairs in exchange for one month's free rent. They were told the place would only need a handrail and a repaired water heater to pass a Morton building inspection, they said. Then, one day about two weeks later, Cindy McLaughlin heard a crack, felt something on her head and looked up. It looked as if the upstairs bathtub was about to become a downstairs feature.
NEWS
April 24, 1994 | By Galina Espinoza, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The request that came into the building-inspection office was a relatively simple one: A senior citizen living alone wanted her gutters cleaned out. She was eligible under the township's Handy Helper program, which provides minor home repairs for income-qualified senior citizens and disabled homeowners. But when an inspector went to the woman's home, he discovered a far more serious problem: There were no smoke detectors. Not that smoke detectors would do any good, because the woman is deaf and would not be alerted by the beeping of an alarm.
NEWS
February 2, 1998 | By Tanyanika Samuels, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sixty thousand dollars is up for grabs in the borough, and officials are urging eligible residents to come forward and claim it. The money, set aside to help with home repairs, is surplus from a $200,000 Small Cities Block Grant the borough received more than three years ago from the state. Funds are available to any community resident who meets the state requirements for the grant. The applicant must own and occupy a home in need of repair, and must have low to moderate income.
FOOD
August 28, 1991 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Many senior citizens shy away from making home improvements because they can't afford them, or think they can't. Susan Klein, director of housing for the Philadelphia Corporation for Aging, said she's seen seniors devise ingenious systems to get by, such as pulleys when they can't carry things. And she's known seniors who moved to institutions prematurely because they feared they would be unable to carry out basic home repairs. Architect John Teets said he's seen people replace a bathroom door with a curtain to allow easier entry for a wheelchair user, rather than install a different kind of door.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | By Debbie Stone, Daily News Staff Writer
Melonie Hurling says she works so hard getting money together for home repairs that she doesn't have much time to help her daughter with her schoolwork. Gladys Pompey says she is too busy trying to keep the sewage from backing up in her toilet and sink to attend the frequent parent meetings at her children's schools. She cannot afford a plumber. Both Hurling and Pompey, whose children attend Heston Elementary in Carroll Park in West Philadelphia, received word yesterday that help is on the way, so they have more time to be involved with their children's schoolwork.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012
Q: I have a relationship with my ex that I think is time to let go of. We broke up 12 years ago. Since then, he's had three unsuccessful live-in relationships. About three years ago, our relationship started to shift toward dating. We have tried three times and it does not work. But it's hard to move on because this man takes care of me like nobody else ever has. If my car breaks down, I use his brand-new car, if something needs fixing, he fixes it, etc. I know he loves me, he tells me all the time, but when I seek commitment he just keeps me at arm's length.
NEWS
July 2, 2010 | By Amy Dickinson
Dear Amy: I've been with my partner for more than 15 years, and we have, from the very start, kept most of our money separate. We've put money in our budget to cover everyday household needs and mortgages, and always made decisions on "extras" that come up, such as replacing the furnace. We've been good about saving. Our strategy has worked well until recently. My partner was laid off from his job about six months ago. He's been diligent about looking for work, while at the same time buying himself all sorts of toys worth a few thousand dollars using his personal savings.
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REAL_ESTATE
April 13, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey residents, like their counterparts in Pennsylvania (as outlined in this space last week), can avail themselves of free or low-cost home-repair programs, utility assistance, and housing-counseling services. Here is a sampling, compiled by the Housing and Community Development Network of New Jersey:   Statewide The New Jersey Housing and Mortgage Finance Agency works with first-time home buyers, senior citizens, and special-needs homeowners. Call its consumer hotline, 800-654-6873, or visit the website, www.njhousing.gov/dca/hmfa , for information.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four community leaders were honored Wednesday by the philanthropic arm of one of Camden's most prominent corporate citizens for working to improve life in the city. "A lot of issues get attention in Camden, and what's overlooked are these individuals who really make an impact and try to get to the root of poverty and the different things it affects - be it education, jobs, housing, and health," said Amanda Bauman, program director of the Campbell Soup Foundation, of the awards for Anthony J. Perno 3d, Curtis Myers, Bridget Phifer, and Sabine Mehnert.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Asher Raphael , "chief strategy officer" at Chester-based Power Home Remodeling Group , says it's time to expand into another new city. Hire a couple hundred people. Send them out to bang on a lot more doors. Sell more windows. Power has opened in Atlanta, Boston, and Chicago, and on Long Island in the three years since then- Gov. Ed Rendell authorized a $300,000 grant to ease the company's move into a state business-tax-break zone in Chester. At that site in a former electric utility building, Power now employs more than 200, and claims $40 million in yearly local sales, at about $10,000 a customer.
NEWS
August 11, 2013 | By Theodore Schleifer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bill sponsored by U.S. Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick (R., Pa.) to limit the amount of money senior citizens can borrow against the value of their homes became law Friday afternoon. President Obama signed the bill, which was also sponsored by Rep. Denny Heck (D., Wash.) and passed easily in the House and the Senate. It was one of only 22 pieces of legislation passed thus far in this session of Congress. The one-page bill authorizes the Federal Housing Administration to craft regulations that would cap the amount senior citizens can initially withdraw in return for some of the value of their homes.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
LaVern Pyles Jr., 94, a retired Navy commander and former state legislator from Montgomery County, died Thursday, June 20, of heart disease and cancer at Brittany Pointe Estates in Lansdale. Mr. Pyles was elected as a Republican to the Pennsylvania legislature in 1974 and represented the 151st District in eastern Montgomery County for six years ending Nov. 30, 1980. A native of Washington, Mr. Pyles graduated from McKinley Technical High School in 1937. He worked for the Western Electric Division of AT&T as a cable splicer in his hometown for two years before joining the Corps of Cadets at Clemson A&M, now Clemson University, in South Carolina.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
David J. Damiano Sr., 79, of Garnet Valley, a former Philadelphia streets commissioner and longtime sanitation engineer, died Monday, Feb. 18, at home of complications from the flu. Born and raised in Philadelphia, Mr. Damiano was a 1955 undergraduate of Villanova University. He earned a master's degree in civil engineering from the school in 1963. He was a longtime Philadelphia employee, starting in 1955 as a graduate engineer and working his way up to chief engineer of sanitation.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Isadore "Irv" Rosenthal, 87, an expert on chemical and environmental safety who served on the U.S. Chemical Safety Board, died Sunday, Feb. 10, of pneumonia at Pennswood Village, a retirement community in Newtown, Bucks County. Mr. Rosenthal, a longtime resident of Levittown, worked for 38 years at Rohm & Haas Co. in a variety of positions. He was corporate director of safety, health, environmental affairs, and product integrity for the last 13 years of his career at the Philadelphia-based company.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
IT WAS common for Pablo Valdez to open his door to people, whether it was for a neighbor seeking advice or a relative who needed assistance. That's the way a 30-year-old stepson remembered Valdez on Sunday, two days after the 56-year-old Cuban immigrant was gunned down in his Feltonville home during a home invasion. "Out of the whole family, he was the oldest man. His sisters and everybody used to look to him" for counsel, recalled the stepson, who declined to give his name for fear of retaliation because no arrests had been made in Valdez's slaying.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Victims of Sandy can start applying today for financial aid from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. South Jersey residents of Atlantic, Cape May, and Ocean counties are eligible for immediate assistance under President Obama's disaster declaration. Residents of other, undesignated counties may also apply for assistance, and FEMA assessors will determine if they qualify, said FEMA spokesman Matthew Behnke. Assistance can include grants for temporary housing and home repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses, and other programs to help individuals and business owners recover from the effects of the disaster.
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