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Home Rule

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NEWS
August 27, 1990 | By NEAL R. PEIRCE
Poland, the country that lit the spark that led to the liberation of Eastern Europe, is extending democratic self-government to the grassroots, bidding to be leader again. The Sejm, the revivified parliament, has granted home-rule powers to the nation's 2,400 municipalities. No less than 52,000 local officials, the first democratically chosen mayors and councils since the 1930s, were elected May 27. Not Czechoslovakia, not Hungary, not any other nation of the crumbled Soviet empire has moved beyond nationwide parliamentary democracy to let citizens choose their own city and town leaders.
NEWS
September 5, 1993 | By Savannah Blackwell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Although the idea of reforming the tax collector's job has found favor among township commissioners, board members last week seemed disinclined to spend $7,500 for an independent study of home rule. Home rule was raised as an option at the Board of Commissioners' Aug. 12 meeting, when President Richard E. Fluge said the tax collector should be appointed rather than elected, and thereby more accountable to the board. Pennsylvania's First Class Township Code requires that a tax collector be elected.
NEWS
June 12, 1995 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
If all goes according to plan, the Pennsylvania legislature this week should begin voting on a series of bills that would help passage of the state's $16.1 billion general funds spending plan for fiscal 1996. Republican leaders in the House and Senate have been hunkered down in negotiations with Republican Gov. Ridge over what shape the state budget will ultimately take. As of this weekend, a critical element remained out of grasp: the handful of votes needed to get the governor's educational package over the top in the House.
NEWS
May 21, 1987 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Primary day was strike three for a home-rule charter in Abington Township. By an unofficial 54 percent to 46 percent, Abington Township voters cast "no" votes to the proposed charter, which would have taken executive responsibilities away from the Board of Commissioners and made it harder to fire the township manager. "I'm disappointed in the voters of Abington," said Patricia Murtha, one of nine study-commission members. "Home rule would have given them a stronger form of government.
NEWS
March 3, 1988 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's becoming routine in Haverford Township, recurring about twice a month. The words vary slightly, but the outcome does not. It happens like this: Commissioner Ben Kapustin makes a motion to break up a controversial home- rule referendum into separate ballot questions. That way, voters could reject a move to add two at-large commissioners to the board and still approve five, less weighty governmental questions. The board rejects the motion, generally by a vote of something-to-three, with Fred Moran and Kenneth Clouse siding with Kapustin.
NEWS
July 1, 2001 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gwendolyn Faison was hopping mad. Camden's mayor had just spoken at a rally hastily pulled together to oppose legislation that would have stripped her and City Council of their powers to govern New Jersey's poorest city. The bill was part of a state plan to revitalize the city by appointing a financial czar to oversee it while pouring in millions in state resources. But Faison - Camden's first female African American mayor - was having none of it. "They don't know who they're messing with," the 76-year-old grandmother said after stepping down from the podium in Camden's City Hall Plaza that sunny June day. Though frail-looking by comparison to her brawny, controversial predecessor, Milton Milan, Faison is already making waves, battling to preserve home rule while reviving her impoverished city.
NEWS
June 18, 1986 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Special to The Inquirer
A panel set up by voters to study possible changes in Bucks County's government has voted not to recommend any revisions and to disband next month after it issues a final report. By a 5-4 margin, the Bucks County Government Study Commission rejected the idea of drafting a home-rule charter. A second option - to recommend one of six optional forms of government without drafting a home-rule charter - was defeated by a vote of 7-2. The vote, taken Monday night, followed five months of hearings at a cost to the taxpayers of about $42,000, according to John McClure, chairman of the commission and a Republican.
NEWS
March 11, 1987
The Feb. 24 editorial "Kean must not waver now" clearly establishes that The Inquirer is not a truly American newspaper. Home rule is sacrosanct not only in public education but also in the total operation of a democracy. If the State of New Jersey, including Gov. Kean, would carry out court mandates on the financing of public education, school districts would not fall short of the funds necessary to do what is required. It is evident that The Inquirer is unmindful also of the two sad cases - Trenton and Newark - in which the state did intervene for periods of five years, costing local taxpayers more than $10 million in each instance, and left with nothing improved.
NEWS
June 18, 1986
If the people of Bucks County took as much interest in the condition of their county government as they do in the condition of their front lawns, they would have more money in their pockets at the end of the year and they would have a county government responsive to the needs of the people rather than the needs of the political professionals. The problem is the party bosses. With a patronage form of government such as we have here, "bossism" rules supreme. A Government Study Commission was elected last November to study and propose changes to modernize our archaic form of government.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Voters in sparsely populated Highland Township, Elk County, where a proposed Marcellus Shale wastewater disposal well has divided the community, voted Tuesday to create a home-rule charter commission. By a 91-78 margin, 54 percent of voters approved a ballot measure establishing a seven-member commission to write a charter, which would be presented to voters at a later date for approval. Seneca Resources Corp., a drilling company that wants to build a wastewater injection well, has mounted a legal challenge against a township ordinance banning the sites.
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BUSINESS
April 29, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Voters in sparsely populated Highland Township, Elk County, where a proposed Marcellus Shale wastewater disposal well has divided the community, voted Tuesday to create a home-rule charter commission. By a 91-78 margin, 54 percent of voters approved a ballot measure establishing a seven-member commission to write a charter, which would be presented to voters at a later date for approval. Seneca Resources Corp., a drilling company that wants to build a wastewater injection well, has mounted a legal challenge against a township ordinance banning the sites.
NEWS
March 28, 2016
John Rossi is a professor emeritus of history who taught Irish history for more than 40 years at La Salle University April 24 marks the centennial of the Easter Rising, the key turning point in modern Irish history. For five days, primarily in Dublin but also in other parts of Ireland, Irish rebels attempted to seize power and drive the English rulers from their country. The leaders of the rebellion were an amalgam of various radical Irish factions: the Irish Republican Brotherhood, Sinn Fein, the Irish Volunteers, even a handful of Irish socialists and feminists.
NEWS
May 9, 2015
ISSUE | SICK LEAVE Home rule forgotten I find it astounding that the rationale of State Sen. John Eichelberger (R., Blair) in trying to abolish Philadelphia's sick-pay law is that local governments should not be allowed to govern, when it's a core Republican value that local communities should be able to do so ("Phila. sick-leave law is praised," April 22). Furthermore, the state House majority leader's spokesman, Steve Miskin, contends that government should not interfere with the private sector.
SPORTS
April 15, 2014 | BY DAVID MURPHY, Daily News Staff Writer dmurphy@phillynews.com
IT TOOK only 54 seconds for umpires to confirm what they ruled they had seen in the fourth inning. It is going to take a lot longer for the Phillies to understand. "I think nobody really knows what the rule is, honestly," Tony Gwynn Jr. said. The situation: sixth inning, tie game, Gwynn on first base. Chase Utley lines a double to leftfield, where Marlins rookie Christian Yelich juggles the ball as he fields it off the ground. Phillies third-base coach Pete Mackanin waves Gwynn around third.
SPORTS
June 20, 2013 | Associated Press
A Boston man found dead Tuesday morning in an industrial park about a mile from the home of Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez was the victim of a homicide, officials in Massachusetts said Wednesday. Bristol District Attorney Samuel Sutter's office, however, did not elaborate on the details of 27-year-old Odin Lloyd's death. His family said Lloyd played for the Boston Bandits semipro football team and had connections to Hernandez, but did not provide details. "My son is a wonderful child," his mother, Ursula Ward, said, crying as she spoke outside the family's home.
NEWS
December 6, 2012
By Chad Goerner An Inquirer poll this fall showed that New Jersey residents are increasingly in favor of municipal consolidation and shared services. It may not be clear to elected officials attached to "home rule" in a state with 566 municipalities (soon to be 565), but the residents are right. A year ago, the residents of Princeton Borough and Princeton Township, where I'm the mayor, approved the state's first large municipal consolidation in more than a century - a move expected to save millions and improve services.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
One woman said she was charged when she had her boyfriend over for Thanksgiving dinner. A 57-year-old man said he got into trouble for visiting his sister. In the crowd waiting for Woodbury Municipal Court to open on a recent Wednesday were these two and others who had run afoul of the town's requirement that anyone living at a rental property register with authorities. Ryan McMichael, 22, said he got a summons after he and a friend got into a fight on his front lawn. Neither pressed charges, but police cited McMichael for allowing the friend, who was wanted on outstanding warrants, to stay at his apartment.
NEWS
May 16, 2011
You might think you're ready for tomorrow's election. And, sure, you might have attended your local council forum, read your campaign literature and even clipped out endorsements. But we bet you're not ready. Because you're going to walk into that voting booth, look at the ballot, and realize that - once again - you've forgotten all about the ballot question. The single yes-or-no question on tomorrow's ballot asks voters if the Home Rule Charter, the city's governing document, should be amended to create a new commission called the Jobs Commission.
NEWS
May 14, 2009 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They may not get the attention of the district attorney's race, but the city will vote in Tuesday's primary on two proposed changes to its Home Rule Charter. The first (Bill 080748) would mandate that police, firefighters, and paramedics killed in the line of duty would automatically receive a posthumous promotion to the next rank, entitling their families to higher pension payments. The second (Bill 090171) would allow City Council to decide, by a two-thirds vote, how and when the city's legal notices on hearings, bills, procurement contracts, etc., should be disseminated.
NEWS
January 26, 2009 | By Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Robert Burton called the Medford Lakes police to report that someone had cut the $3 Christmas lights on his house, not only did the police chief answer the phone, Burton recalled, but two squad cars had pulled up to investigate by the time he had hung up and walked outside. "Tell me where that happens," Burton said. When they're not working out of the department's log cabin headquarters, police officers say, they are driving up to 70 miles per 12-hour shift as they patrol their 1.2 square-mile borough of woods, lakes and rustic homes.
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