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Homeland Security

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NEWS
January 31, 2005 | MICHELLE MALKIN
REMEMBER when immigration officials sent out flight-school visa approval notices for two of the 9/11 hijackers - six months after they committed their suicide attacks on America? President Bush was outraged, four federal immigration officials were reassigned and Washington vowed that such embarrassing bureaucratic snafus would never happen again. It has, in fact, happened again. On Jan. 15, immigration officials sent a notice to Eugueni Kniazev of Brooklyn, N.Y. The letter informs Kniazev, an immigrant from Siberia, that he is "deemed to be a lawful permanent resident of the United States.
NEWS
August 8, 2007
The Democrat-controlled Congress and President Bush haven't agreed on much this year, but the new homeland security legislation is a shining exception. Signed into law by Bush Friday, this measure finally implements many recommendations made by the independent 9/11 commission. That report came out three years ago, and too many of its wise suggestions have been ignored in Washington. The new law addresses one of the biggest drawbacks of recent homeland security spending: sparsely populated states with few terrorist targets have received a disproportionately large share of the federal pie. This measure will cut in half the amount of guaranteed grants given to states without regard to their risk of attack.
NEWS
September 29, 2004 | By ROB HOUSMAN
VICE President Dick Cheney recently charged that a vote for John Kerry was an invitation to a terrorist attack. Tough rhetoric notwithstanding, it is actually the president's homeland security policies that leave this nation unacceptably vulnerable to such an attack. Consider Pennsylvania: The state is home to Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell, two of the most potent symbols of our democracy. That and other factors make large areas of the state a potential terror target. Despite this, in 2004, Pennsylvania received just $5.90 per capita in federal counterterrorism funding, placing it 45th among all the states.
NEWS
November 13, 2001 | By MICHAEL SMERCONISH
RUDY WAS THERE within minutes. No sooner had American Airlines flight 587 dropped from the sky than the mayor of New York arrived with the first responders. The accident occurred in Queens, but so strong and bright is Rudy's star that I wouldn't have been surprised (or disappointed) if I saw him at a tragedy outside of New York's city limits. It doesn't look like this crash was the work of terrorists, but Rudy's presence was nevertheless reassuring. He's a realist, he's honest, and if somebody's butt needs to be kicked in the name of justice, you know he'll put the hammer down.
NEWS
November 24, 2001 | By ROBERT GATES
THE OFFICE of homeland defense has accomplished very little so far, and Americans are beginning to wonder if Tom Ridge, its director, is holding an empty title. A little perspective and a little patience are in order. The parts of the government that organized our response in Afghanistan have had more than 50 years of experience in working together through the National Security Council. Their bureaucracies have collaborated through several wars and scores of lesser military operations, covert actions and attendant diplomatic endeavors.
NEWS
November 26, 2002 | Daily News wire services
President Bush (right) signed legislation yesterday creating a new Department of Homeland Security and launching the largest government reorganization since 1947. About 170,000 workers in 22 agencies will move into the new department to foster better communication among agencies in an effort to prevent future terrorist attacks on American soil. Key dates in the White House transition plan released yesterday: JAN. 24: Establishment of office of the secretary of the new Department of Homeland Security.
NEWS
March 15, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Lawmakers blistered the Bush administration yesterday for "a severe attitude problem" in its dealings with Congress, threatening to withhold money because of Homeland Security chief Tom Ridge's refusal to testify on Capitol Hill. At a hearing, White House Budget Director Mitch Daniels was taken to task by House Appropriations Committee members. "You and several others in the administration, in my view, have a severe attitude problem," said Wisconsin Rep. David Obey, the top Democrat on the committee.
NEWS
January 14, 2005
President Bush's selection of Michael Chertoff to head the Department of Homeland Security could be good for residents of this region. The New Jersey native should be responsive to the legitimate criticism that too few federal dollars are being spent to protect those East Coast sites most likely to be hit by terrorists. Bernard Kerik, Bush's previous nominee to direct homeland security, was lobbied hard by both Sen. Jon Corzine (D., N.J.) and acting New Jersey Gov. Richard Codey to change the way funds are allocated.
NEWS
February 3, 2002 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The United States must develop a more focused plan to protect the country against terrorist attacks, panelists said yesterday at the midyear meeting of the American Bar Association. The lawyers' group, whose standing committee on law and national security has examined terrorism for 10 years, said homeland security involves such legal issues as civil rights and international law. Yesterday, experts discussed the "roles and responsibilities" of homeland defense. After the Sept.
NEWS
October 26, 2004
This Week U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.) and his opponent, U.S. Rep. Joseph Hoeffel (D., Pa.), will answer questions from members of The Inquirer's Citizens Voices panel on the Pennsylvania and Metro commentary pages. Subjects will include No Child Left Behind, military spending, and national energy policies. Michael J. Leventhal of Doylestown asks: Is enough being done to protect local targets in Pennsylvania, such as our nuclear plants, water sources and harbors, from terrorism?
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NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Grace Toohey, Staff Writer
The greatest danger to Pennsylvanians is less likely to come from terrorists plotting attacks halfway around the world than from a homegrown extremist in their own backyard, the state's homeland security chief said Monday. "The 'lone wolf' doesn't need ISIS," Homeland Security Director Marcus Brown said at a terrorism awareness and response symposium in King of Prussia. "They're much less pushing the organized attack from ISIS to the United States, they're saying, 'Go do something, don't wait for us to tell you.' " Brown was among more than 600 law enforcement personnel gathered at the Valley Forge Sheraton for the daylong conference put on by the state.
NEWS
July 26, 2016 | By Chris Palmer and Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITERS
The party is here - and so are the people charged with protecting it. Thousands of law enforcement officials from at least 50 federal, state, and local agencies are expected to descend upon Philadelphia to secure this week's Democratic National Convention, as well as the dozens of protests associated with it. "We are absolutely ready," said Philadelphia Police Commissioner Richard Ross. "We always say success is never final," said Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy . "That doesn't mean we're not dialed in and focused.
NEWS
July 16, 2016
Police on Thursday were investigating a threat to bomb the African American Museum in Philadelphia during the Democratic National Convention here this month. The museum, at Seventh and Arch Streets in Center City, received a threatening letter Thursday and reported it to police. Chief Inspector Joseph Sullivan, who oversees homeland security for city police, said detectives were investigating. Museum officials could not be reached for comment. - Robert Moran
NEWS
July 13, 2016
Philadelphia homeland-security detectives were questioning two people found on the roof of a Center City hotel with smoke bombs and cameras Monday night, police said. The two were on the roof of the Hyatt at the Bellevue in the 200 block of South Broad Street. Chief Inspector Joseph Sullivan, who oversees homeland security, said Monday that "at this time no crime has been committed," but his detectives were conducting "noncustodial interviews. " - Robert Moran
NEWS
July 13, 2016
By Micah Meadowcroft This year's Fourth of July weekend went more smoothly than last year's. Then I spent part of the weekend sleeping fitfully on a backpack, a gym bag, and two chairs stuffed together outside an airport coffee kiosk. All because there was a worry that I was a terrorist. Flying to the United States from Dublin, you're supposed to arrive three hours before takeoff. The airport's Terminal 2 contains a U.S preclearance facility, meaning that after a second round of security - TSA-approved - and a chat with U.S. Customs and Border Protection, passengers flying to the states are considered domestic arrivals.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Carl M. Buchholz, 51, of Flourtown, a Philadelphia lawyer and civic leader who was tapped by President George W. Bush to help create the White House Office of Homeland Security after 9/11, died of cancer Monday, May 23, at his home. "He was an unmatched leader as well as one of the most dedicated, forthright, and effective colleagues I've had the privilege to work with," said Drexel University president John A. Fry, who knew Mr. Buchholz as a friend and Drexel board member. "He fought hard and bravely over the past year against the disease that took his life.
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
A longtime Villanova University professor has been charged with hundreds of counts of possessing child pornography, Radnor Township police said Thursday. Christopher Haas, 60, a tenured associate professor of history and classical studies, was arrested after university officials discovered he accessed pornographic images on a public university computer last month, officials said. The charges on 415 counts came four years after investigators from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Philadelphia office began an investigation into Haas during which authorities allege they found more than 400 pornographic images on the Villanova-issued laptop at his home in September 2012.
NEWS
March 24, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Philadelphia police and federal law enforcement authorities stepped up patrols at Philadelphia International Airport after the terrorist attacks Tuesday morning in Brussels. "Passengers should notice an increased visible presence of law enforcement both in, and around, the airport," airport spokeswoman Mary Flannery said. Philadelphia police and federal law enforcement officials patrolled the airport arrivals roadway, the departures road, and inside and outside security screening areas, Flannery said.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | BY TRICIA L. NADOLNY, Staff Writer
FORMER MAYOR Michael Nutter is no stranger to cable news networks, but typically he was the focus of the headlines. Now, he's ready to try his hand at weighing in on the day's news - as a commentator for CNN. "It came together pretty quickly," Nutter said Monday afternoon from CNN's Washington offices, where he was preparing to go live to discuss the Iowa caucuses. "And it's definitely an honor. My goal is to try to communicate a message that is direct, authentic, and represents a reality of 20-plus years of elected office.
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