CollectionsHomeland Security
IN THE NEWS

Homeland Security

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 31, 2005 | MICHELLE MALKIN
REMEMBER when immigration officials sent out flight-school visa approval notices for two of the 9/11 hijackers - six months after they committed their suicide attacks on America? President Bush was outraged, four federal immigration officials were reassigned and Washington vowed that such embarrassing bureaucratic snafus would never happen again. It has, in fact, happened again. On Jan. 15, immigration officials sent a notice to Eugueni Kniazev of Brooklyn, N.Y. The letter informs Kniazev, an immigrant from Siberia, that he is "deemed to be a lawful permanent resident of the United States.
NEWS
August 8, 2007
The Democrat-controlled Congress and President Bush haven't agreed on much this year, but the new homeland security legislation is a shining exception. Signed into law by Bush Friday, this measure finally implements many recommendations made by the independent 9/11 commission. That report came out three years ago, and too many of its wise suggestions have been ignored in Washington. The new law addresses one of the biggest drawbacks of recent homeland security spending: sparsely populated states with few terrorist targets have received a disproportionately large share of the federal pie. This measure will cut in half the amount of guaranteed grants given to states without regard to their risk of attack.
NEWS
September 29, 2004 | By ROB HOUSMAN
VICE President Dick Cheney recently charged that a vote for John Kerry was an invitation to a terrorist attack. Tough rhetoric notwithstanding, it is actually the president's homeland security policies that leave this nation unacceptably vulnerable to such an attack. Consider Pennsylvania: The state is home to Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell, two of the most potent symbols of our democracy. That and other factors make large areas of the state a potential terror target. Despite this, in 2004, Pennsylvania received just $5.90 per capita in federal counterterrorism funding, placing it 45th among all the states.
NEWS
November 13, 2001 | By MICHAEL SMERCONISH
RUDY WAS THERE within minutes. No sooner had American Airlines flight 587 dropped from the sky than the mayor of New York arrived with the first responders. The accident occurred in Queens, but so strong and bright is Rudy's star that I wouldn't have been surprised (or disappointed) if I saw him at a tragedy outside of New York's city limits. It doesn't look like this crash was the work of terrorists, but Rudy's presence was nevertheless reassuring. He's a realist, he's honest, and if somebody's butt needs to be kicked in the name of justice, you know he'll put the hammer down.
NEWS
November 24, 2001 | By ROBERT GATES
THE OFFICE of homeland defense has accomplished very little so far, and Americans are beginning to wonder if Tom Ridge, its director, is holding an empty title. A little perspective and a little patience are in order. The parts of the government that organized our response in Afghanistan have had more than 50 years of experience in working together through the National Security Council. Their bureaucracies have collaborated through several wars and scores of lesser military operations, covert actions and attendant diplomatic endeavors.
NEWS
November 26, 2002 | Daily News wire services
President Bush (right) signed legislation yesterday creating a new Department of Homeland Security and launching the largest government reorganization since 1947. About 170,000 workers in 22 agencies will move into the new department to foster better communication among agencies in an effort to prevent future terrorist attacks on American soil. Key dates in the White House transition plan released yesterday: JAN. 24: Establishment of office of the secretary of the new Department of Homeland Security.
NEWS
March 15, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Lawmakers blistered the Bush administration yesterday for "a severe attitude problem" in its dealings with Congress, threatening to withhold money because of Homeland Security chief Tom Ridge's refusal to testify on Capitol Hill. At a hearing, White House Budget Director Mitch Daniels was taken to task by House Appropriations Committee members. "You and several others in the administration, in my view, have a severe attitude problem," said Wisconsin Rep. David Obey, the top Democrat on the committee.
NEWS
January 14, 2005
President Bush's selection of Michael Chertoff to head the Department of Homeland Security could be good for residents of this region. The New Jersey native should be responsive to the legitimate criticism that too few federal dollars are being spent to protect those East Coast sites most likely to be hit by terrorists. Bernard Kerik, Bush's previous nominee to direct homeland security, was lobbied hard by both Sen. Jon Corzine (D., N.J.) and acting New Jersey Gov. Richard Codey to change the way funds are allocated.
NEWS
February 3, 2002 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The United States must develop a more focused plan to protect the country against terrorist attacks, panelists said yesterday at the midyear meeting of the American Bar Association. The lawyers' group, whose standing committee on law and national security has examined terrorism for 10 years, said homeland security involves such legal issues as civil rights and international law. Yesterday, experts discussed the "roles and responsibilities" of homeland defense. After the Sept.
NEWS
October 26, 2004
This Week U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.) and his opponent, U.S. Rep. Joseph Hoeffel (D., Pa.), will answer questions from members of The Inquirer's Citizens Voices panel on the Pennsylvania and Metro commentary pages. Subjects will include No Child Left Behind, military spending, and national energy policies. Michael J. Leventhal of Doylestown asks: Is enough being done to protect local targets in Pennsylvania, such as our nuclear plants, water sources and harbors, from terrorism?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Marcus Brown, whose nomination to lead the Pennsylvania State Police was quashed earlier this year, has been tapped again by Gov. Wolf for a public safety post. Wolf on Thursday appointed Brown director of the Governor's Office of Homeland Security, where he will lead the state's response to terrorism and infrastructure threats. "The commonwealth must take every step necessary to protect its citizens from terrorist threats, and I am confident that Col. Brown's leadership and experience will be an asset to the commonwealth in this role," Wolf said in a statement.
NEWS
July 9, 2015
AS A CITY, we've gotten pretty good at attracting and handling crowds, and with the number of visitors growing year after year, we get more and more practice. Thanks in part to the smart management of the city's "Visit Philadelphia" tourism office, the number of visitors has increased every year for the past 18 years, with 39 million domestic visitors in 2013. This provided more than $10 billion in economic impact in that year alone, creating jobs and activity in hospitality and beyond.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Along with the pomp and pride that comes with hosting the 2016 Democratic National Convention, there's an underside for Philadelphia: begging Congress for money. Since 9/11, federal lawmakers have set aside $100 million every four years to help cover security costs for the cities hosting the national party conventions, but only after overcoming resistance from those who balk at laying out taxpayer money for lavish political rallies. The wrangling in those fights provides a window into how pet causes creep onto the federal tab - often as footnotes in larger and more pressing bills.
NEWS
May 30, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer and Cat Coyle, Inquirer Staff Writers
A Department of Homeland Security official said Thursday his agency was surveying the security vulnerabilities of all Philadelphia buildings and facilities near the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, where Pope Francis will appear twice in September. William Ryan, protective security adviser in Philadelphia, said his agency was examining building exits, screening employees, and searching for hazardous materials to get ready for the papal visit Sept. 26 and 27. He said the agency would make security recommendations for the hotels and other buildings it surveys.
NEWS
May 19, 2015
A story Monday wrongly described Michael Chertoff's term as secretary of homeland security. Chertoff succeeded Tom Ridge and served from 2005 to 2009. A caption Friday with a capsule on the movie Where Hope Grows misidentified one of the actors. Pictured were David DeSanctis and Kristoffer Polaha. A "By the Numbers" box with a story on the Williamson Free School of Industrial Trades wrongly described a ratio. The student-to-teacher ratio is 13-1.
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since Homeland Security agents took Kiyonna Napier's husband, Fidel, into custody this week, her days have been consumed by scrambling to make sure the couple's three children get to school in the mornings - a responsibility her husband always handled. At night, Fidel Napier calls from Newark, N.J., where he is being held as federal authorities prepare to deport him to Jamaica, and talks briefly with her and their children. "I just keep praying, keep hoping something will change," Kiyonna Napier said Friday from her Pennsauken home.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fidel Napier left home early Monday to drop off his daughter at school, his wife said. When he returned to his Pennsauken home, agents from the Department of Homeland Security were there to take him into custody. Napier, 37, had been waiting for that moment for months, since learning he would be deported to his native Jamaica because of a 1998 drug conviction. The agents allowed him to call his wife, Kiyonna, who raced home from work to say goodbye. "They wouldn't let me touch him or anything," Kiyonna Napier said Tuesday.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fidel Napier spent more than a decade making peace with a crime in his past, until one day it upended his life. At 20, Napier pleaded guilty to selling cocaine on a street corner in Camden, an offense for which he served no time. Since then, Napier has worked, married his high school sweetheart, had three children, and coached youth basketball. The arrest saved him, says Napier, now 37. Then in the fall of 2010, two agents from the Department of Homeland Security showed up at the manufacturing company where Napier worked and took him into custody.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The subject was one kids don't want to talk about: online predators. On Thursday, the entire student body at the Country Day School of the Sacred Heart in Radnor Township - about 400 in kindergarten through eighth grade - participated in Project iGuardian, an online safety initiative started last year by the Department of Homeland Security. "Law enforcement cannot arrest our way out of this problem," said William S. Walker, assistant special agent in charge. Education is key to warn parents and children of the "perils of the Internet," he said.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
MAYOR NUTTER is scheduled to meet behind closed doors today with U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson to discuss preparations for the upcoming papal visit to the city, the mayor's spokesman said yesterday. Nutter and Johnson may also discuss security details related to the next Democratic National Convention that is scheduled to take place here in 2016 after the mayor leaves office, and the city's policy regarding U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detainer requests, spokesman Mark McDonald said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|