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Homeless People

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NEWS
September 24, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They're young fashion design students, and some dream of one day having their own line of clothing that's distinctive, stylish, and synonymous with their name. As for their class project, well, haute it was not. A first it may be, and a challenging one at that: a design that's distinctive, versatile and practical, but not so flashy it invites theft or broadcasts its wearer's situation. Vests for the homeless. "I really liked this. I didn't want to see the same old thing," said Megan Dennis, 29, instructor of the "special topics in fashion design" class at the Art Institute of Philadelphia in Center City.
NEWS
February 24, 2008 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Riggins, 41, had every intention of making the Army a career when she enlisted after graduating from Olney High School. She planned to stay at least 20 years. She made it to 15 years and one month. Riggins was stationed in Heidelberg, Germany, as a staff sergeant, making maps for troops in the field. On Feb. 17, 2001, she was discharged for medical reasons. Asthma that began to develop 10 years earlier, after a stint in the Saudi Arabian desert, became more severe.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware County Council has approved a $100,000 contract to provide housing for four mentally ill homeless people. The contract, with a Philadelphia firm called Horizon House Inc., will pay for apartment rentals and counseling for the renters. "The people have to be able to live unsupervised," said Susan Pesotki, who is in charge of the county's adult services department. A caseworker will visit each person every day and arrange for mental health treatment. The money comes from a federal program.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sam did not die Wednesday night. Despite the cold and the untold ounces of Hurricane Malt Liquor he drank; despite shivering uncontrollably in his bed of ragged blankets beneath I-95 in South Philadelphia - Sam survived. That's because a team from Project H.O.M.E. and the city's Department of Behavioral Health cajoled and begged the homeless 52-year-old native of Ho Chi Minh City to let them take him to the emergency room at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in the midst of a code-blue alert under a frigid moon.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | By Dan Hardy, Special to The Inquirer
When the activist group Delaware County Housing Now! was looking for someone to hold a banner during a news conference at the 69th Street Terminal in Upper Darby, two bystanders volunteered. Joe Mullen and Tony Smith, homeless men who stay in and around the terminal and sleep there when they can, got off the bench they habitually occupy and proudly held the ends of the banner, which called for people to come to an Oct. 7 Housing Now! march in Washington, D.C. "Homelessness is a vicious web. I'm stuck in it, and I can't get out of it," said Mullen, who added that he had stayed in the area of the terminal for the last four months.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A $2 million program to house 80 homeless men, women and children in three vacant buildings on the former Valley Forge General Hospital site in Schuylkill Township, Chester County, was announced by county officials yesterday. A $1.3 million grant awarded to the Chester County Housing Authority last week by the Department of Housing and Urban Development was the last major grant needed to finance the project, which could begin as early as October 1993, said Barbara Wilson, director of housing and community services for the county.
NEWS
April 12, 1986 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Homeless people will be given priority in filling jobs at emergency shelters that do business with the city under an agreement negotiated by the managing director and advocates for the homeless. The agreement, which is being put into language that will be included in city contracts with the shelters, is expected to take effect July 1. "We want to give homeless people some special consideration when it comes to hiring in the shelters," Managing Director James S. White said last week.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | by April Adamson and Barbara Laker, Daily News Staff Writers Staff Writers Regina Medina and Dave Davies contributed to this report
Passers-by have to strain to see them at night. They huddle against cement walls, clutching tattered backpacks filled with junk: a baseball hat, tin cans, an old notebook, some spare change to buy their next Happy Meal at McDonald's. Thurman Murphy is one of them, homeless for 32 years and counting. Refuge for him is Love Park, underground SEPTA benches and wherever else he can get a night's sleep. Some nights, he is jolted awake by a nightstick on the bottom of his feet.
NEWS
May 21, 2011 | By Jennifer Lin and Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
A weeklong survey of the city's homeless found 528 people living on the streets, slightly more than half of them described as "physically vulnerable and at increased risk of death. " The count was conducted by 250 volunteers, who combed city streets and parks this week from 4 to 6 a.m. compiling a name-and-photo database. Mayor Nutter hosted the volunteers Friday at City Hall and helped release the results of the survey. "The big-picture goal remains the same," he said.
NEWS
June 20, 1992 | By Nathan Gorenstein and Melody Petersen, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Responding to complaints that homeless people at SEPTA's 69th Street Terminal were panhandling and harassing passersby, Upper Darby officials ordered the removal of the wooden benches where the homeless congregated. "We hope it will cut down on the loitering there," said F. Raymond Shay, the township's chief administrative officer. The homeless used the benches, which were attached to a concrete retaining wall at the front of the heavily used terminal, for sleeping, eating and just hanging around.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
We want the homeless now encamped nightly outside the Convention Center to sleep somewhere else. That was the response by some readers to an Inquirer story last week by my colleagues Aubrey Whelan and Mensah Dean. The story reported that with the construction of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and LOVE Park, more homeless people are now sleeping in the underpass outside the Convention Center . What was hidden in the shadows is now in plain sight. Fine. It's uncomfortable to walk past.
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan and Mensah M. Dean, STAFF WRITERS
The street sweeper arrived at 12th and Arch shortly after dawn. With a broom and a wheeled dumpster, he swept around the sleeping forms on the sidewalk under the arches of the Convention Center. As commuters walked past and dozens on the sidewalk stirred awake, the street sweeper collected bottles and plastic wrappers and half-eaten food - all the detritus of a night on the streets. "Clean this dump up," muttered Paul Bunn, folding up his cardboard sleeping mat. There were 55 souls like Bunn waking up on the sidewalk outside the Convention Center one recent morning.
NEWS
June 2, 2016
ISSUE | THE HOMELESS The young suffer, too After reading Mike Newall's original column about Matt, a 28-year-old homeless man in Center City, I had my doubts about him being a veteran. No vet, having served our country, should be living on the streets anywhere in our country ("Heroin Hall," May 25). Why wouldn't he take advantage of every possible resource available to veterans as opposed to his daily objective of getting his next hit of heroin? There must be a deeper reason that his family would allow him to remain homeless.
NEWS
October 10, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Odd things happen when someone drops an old couch onto the lush green lawn of the National Constitution Center. "It's like Friends ," one man cried, piling onto the cushions with his buddies. Others traced an invisible curved line with their steps, staying far from the couch and its tenders, waving away offers of handout cards. Some tourists on Independence Mall accepted an invitation to sit. Others shot cellphone photos. A few, touched by the effort, shared intimate details of their lives that they might have withheld if not for the public prodding of a worn, gray-and-blue sofa.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
BY NOW, the Hub of Hope, Project HOME's seasonal social-service center for the homeless in Suburban Station, should be buzzing with men and women wanting to see a case worker or a doctor or just get a short reprieve from the cold with a tepid cup of coffee or a pair of socks. But in a cruel irony, the Hub of Hope is homeless. In November, the landlord who had donated the space for the past three winters sent word that he would no longer be able to "due to complaints from tenants and brokers.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
If art comes from pain, then James Webster is Michelangelo. He's suffered from depression, alcoholism, and stroke. He's been arrested for assault, divorced by two women, and beaten with bats by gangs, and he lived homeless in North Philadelphia for a year. Through it all, he's painted, taken photographs, and created collages, always understanding that making art was an answer to smoothing out an unruly life. Troubles "have been fuel for art," said Webster, 63, sounding like a blues musician who is alchemist enough to turn misery into music.
TRAVEL
June 8, 2014 | By Megan Kenna, For The Inquirer
Five years ago, I moved abroad to begin my graduate studies in the international city of Brussels, Belgium. Though I had traveled before, I always did so surrounded by close friends, staying in hostels full of Americans, people familiar with the East Coast. But in 2009, I made my home in a foreign country and entered a world of expatriates. Along with the challenges presented by language barriers and cultural confusion came one unexpected quirk - having to explain my hometown. The business of choice in Brussels is politics - European Union politics.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Concerned about reports that a faith-based organization wants to create a 300-bed facility in the township to serve Burlington County's homeless population, about 120 residents turned out for Tuesday's Lumberton Township Committee meeting in hope of sharing their views and learning more. But after Mayor Lew Jackson advised the crowd that the township had received no formal application for the project, and Solicitor Michael Mouber cautioned committee members about voicing opinions on a project they might have to vote on, only a few residents stepped to the microphones.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying Burlington County needs to better serve the hundreds of homeless people within its borders, a faith-based group wants to create a 300-bed residence and training center for them in Lumberton - and some residents who live near the site have begun to organize in opposition. To be called Community of Hope, the facility would be on a former Nike missile base at Municipal Drive and Eayrestown Road. In recent years, the five-acre site was home to the Midway School, which has closed. "We started studying the question of what Burlington County needs five . . . years ago," Kent Pipes, president of the Affordable Homes Group in Westampton, said Monday.
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY They may not have a permanent roof over the heads, but as of Tuesday, Atlantic County's homeless at least have a portal. "This program will give a single point of entry - a doorway - for homeless individuals and families in Atlantic County to find the help and services they need," said Ann Thoresen, director of the Atlantic Homeless Alliance, which opened Tuesday inside the county office building on Atlantic Avenue. Thoresen said finding help - especially as more jobless people join the ranks of the homeless in a faltering regional economy - is a sometimes tangled and difficult process.
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