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Homeless People

LIVING
July 14, 1999 | By Maggie Galehouse, FOR THE INQUIRER
Just inside the entrance to the Sunday Breakfast Rescue Mission, a Center City shelter that provides beds and meals to homeless men, Seth Camm and Kurt Knobelsdorf set up shop. Casually unkempt in old, comfortable clothes, Camm and Knobelsdorf were indistinguishable from the rest of the men except, perhaps, for their youth and their belongings: an easel, a box of oil paints and brushes, and more than 40 portraits lined along the floor of the shelter's far wall. The faces looking out from the paintings belong to the men who walk through the doors.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / GERALD S. WILLIAMS
HUDDLING UNDER BLANKETS, homeless people lie outside the State Office Building at Broad and Spring Garden Streets as employees arrive for work. About 50 people held a rally and a "sleep-out" Monday night to demand more housing for the homeless and medical care for the homeless mentally ill. According to Stephen Gold, attorney for the groups that staged the protest, the state has agreed to fund six residences for 150 mentally ill homeless people this...
NEWS
January 9, 1986 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twenty homeless people and organizers of the Committee for Dignity and Fairness to the Homeless staged a sit-in yesterday at the city managing director's office to protest what they said was the city's failure to secure jobs for them at emergency shelters in Philadelphia. The group shouted, "We want jobs, not promises," for about 30 minutes outside the office of Assistant Managing Director Marion Reitz, who was out of town. Later, leaders of the group met with Managing Director James S. White for a half-hour to discuss what the protesters said were promises made by city officials to help homeless people get staff jobs at shelters.
NEWS
April 1, 2011
This is another in our "make it happen" series of columns about people who see a need and find a way to meet it. If you know about people who manage to get something done in their communities, tell us about them so we can share their stories with our readers.   CRAIG Stroman had perfected that straight-ahead stare that allows us to see but not see the homeless. It's an urban coping mechanism that keeps the images of those dusty men and vacant-eyed women from being seared into our subconscious for the rest of the day. He could look past a guy in four layers of coats pushing a shopping cart full of aluminum cans, or one of those aggressive panhandlers who try to waylay you. But that's not what he saw one day last April.
NEWS
January 8, 2004 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With bitter cold weather forecast through the weekend - the overnight lows are expected to be in the teens - the city has instituted emergency procedures to move homeless people off the streets and into shelters. Special outreach teams are ready around the clock to assist homeless people, said Robert Hess, the city's deputy managing director in charge of special-needs housing. One recreation center in North Philadelphia will be used to provide overflow beds, Hess said, and a center in West Philadelphia could be opened over the weekend.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | by Frank Dougherty and Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writers
Homeless people seized a vacant North Philadelphia building yesterday in a day of protesting that led to seven arrests and a nine-block march down Broad Street that snarled rush-hour traffic. The 75 protesters said they want to take the vacant four-story building on Broad Street just below Girard Avenue for a community life center - a place where perhaps 300 homeless people could sleep, learn, eat and share fellowship. Trouble is, somebody else owns the building. And doesn't seem willing to donate it, said Leona Smith, founder of Delaware Valley Union of the Homeless.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City officials are keeping homeless people with AIDS on the streets by unnecessary delays in spending more than $1 million in rental subsidies, an AIDS activist has charged. David Fair, executive director of We the People Living with AIDS/HIV, an advocacy group, said the city's foot-dragging threatened the lives of homeless people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). "The city has a new housing program for AIDS victims: sleeping in boxes in the subway, bathing in Penn's Landing, setting up house in MAC machine entranceways," Fair said.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Life on the streets is obviously tough. Now an extensive scientific study documents how deadly it can be. The study of 6,308 homeless Philadelphians found that in any given year a homeless person is 3 1/2 times more likely to die than someone who has a place to live. The research, published in today's New England Journal of Medicine, represents the first precise measurement of mortality among the homeless, comparing their death rates with those of people of similar age, sex and race in the general population.
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