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Homeless People

NEWS
July 6, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For nearly two years, students, parents and staff at the Mathematics, Civics and Sciences Charter School have handed out food and supplies to the homeless once a week on the sidewalk near JFK Plaza in Center City. But last Thursday, the city's new managing director, Loree Jones, showed up and told the group to move the program elsewhere. The city in recent months has begun to discourage outdoor feeding of homeless people along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and in JFK Plaza. Veronica Joyner, the charter school's chief executive officer, said police showed up a short time later and ordered the group to disperse, prompting 13-year-old Karima Mims-DeWitt to fearfully ask: "Are we going to go to jail for giving food to the homeless?"
LIVING
July 14, 1999 | By Maggie Galehouse, FOR THE INQUIRER
Just inside the entrance to the Sunday Breakfast Rescue Mission, a Center City shelter that provides beds and meals to homeless men, Seth Camm and Kurt Knobelsdorf set up shop. Casually unkempt in old, comfortable clothes, Camm and Knobelsdorf were indistinguishable from the rest of the men except, perhaps, for their youth and their belongings: an easel, a box of oil paints and brushes, and more than 40 portraits lined along the floor of the shelter's far wall. The faces looking out from the paintings belong to the men who walk through the doors.
NEWS
July 26, 2011 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometimes the problems are so overwhelming that Robert Cordero steps away from his children for a few minutes to pull himself together. While two sons and three daughters play in a cluttered Cherry Hill motel room, he turns up the radio, closes the bathroom door, and cries. "I can't let them see me that way. . . . Who will they look up to?" said the 40-year-old single father. "I have to go back and try to raise five kids. " Cordero's family has lived at the Hillside Inn for more than five months, along with a couple dozen other homeless people surviving on public assistance.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
After two days of testimony from witnesses ranging from homeless advocates to Mayor Nutter, a federal judge has set oral arguments for Thursday on the constitutionality of a new city ordinance that bans the public feeding of groups of homeless people in city parks. "We're ready to go now," said civil rights lawyer Paul M. Messing, who represents four religious groups challenging the feeding ban, after testimony ended Tuesday afternoon. U.S. District Judge William H. Yohn Jr. smiled and told Messing and lawyers for the city to return Thursday.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / GERALD S. WILLIAMS
HUDDLING UNDER BLANKETS, homeless people lie outside the State Office Building at Broad and Spring Garden Streets as employees arrive for work. About 50 people held a rally and a "sleep-out" Monday night to demand more housing for the homeless and medical care for the homeless mentally ill. According to Stephen Gold, attorney for the groups that staged the protest, the state has agreed to fund six residences for 150 mentally ill homeless people this...
NEWS
January 9, 1986 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twenty homeless people and organizers of the Committee for Dignity and Fairness to the Homeless staged a sit-in yesterday at the city managing director's office to protest what they said was the city's failure to secure jobs for them at emergency shelters in Philadelphia. The group shouted, "We want jobs, not promises," for about 30 minutes outside the office of Assistant Managing Director Marion Reitz, who was out of town. Later, leaders of the group met with Managing Director James S. White for a half-hour to discuss what the protesters said were promises made by city officials to help homeless people get staff jobs at shelters.
NEWS
January 8, 2004 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With bitter cold weather forecast through the weekend - the overnight lows are expected to be in the teens - the city has instituted emergency procedures to move homeless people off the streets and into shelters. Special outreach teams are ready around the clock to assist homeless people, said Robert Hess, the city's deputy managing director in charge of special-needs housing. One recreation center in North Philadelphia will be used to provide overflow beds, Hess said, and a center in West Philadelphia could be opened over the weekend.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | by Frank Dougherty and Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writers
Homeless people seized a vacant North Philadelphia building yesterday in a day of protesting that led to seven arrests and a nine-block march down Broad Street that snarled rush-hour traffic. The 75 protesters said they want to take the vacant four-story building on Broad Street just below Girard Avenue for a community life center - a place where perhaps 300 homeless people could sleep, learn, eat and share fellowship. Trouble is, somebody else owns the building. And doesn't seem willing to donate it, said Leona Smith, founder of Delaware Valley Union of the Homeless.
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