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Homestead Act

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NEWS
July 12, 1999 | By William Lamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The North Penn school board likely will approve a ballot question at a special July 29 meeting that would let voters decide whether the district should shift much of its tax burden from property taxes to a new levy on earned income. North Penn is one of only four Pennsylvania school districts giving serious consideration this year to the Taxpayers Local Control Act, also known as the Homestead Act. The 1998 law allows school districts, which rely largely on property taxes to pay for education, to exclude from taxation a portion of the assessed value of a homeowner's primary residence.
NEWS
February 15, 1996 | By Walter Russell Mead
In all the budget brouhaha emanating from Washington, one fact has been overlooked: the effect of cutting Washington's budgets on family budgets around the nation. The plans currently on the table to cut the federal deficit will not make the deficit go away; rather, the plans transfer hundreds of billions of dollars in red ink from the public to the private sector. Washington's budgets may balance if these plans go through. But the family budgets of millions of people in the American middle class won't.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | By William Lamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The North Penn School District would find itself nearly $6 million short of revenue in three years if voters approved a referendum to cut property taxes and levy a new earned-income tax, according to financial projections circulated among school board members this week. The board is considering whether to put to voters in the fall the option of adopting the Taxpayers Local Control Act, also known as Act 50 or the Homestead Act. That debate is expected to continue at tonight's school board meeting and at a public hearing scheduled for July 29. A five-year projection prepared by James J. Sauers, the district's interim finance director, and distributed to school board members Monday buoyed those who have called the law an ill-conceived boondoggle.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | By Laurie Halse Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
Constituents in the state's 147th House of Representatives District live on the far edge of suburban expansion into Montgomery County farmland. The large district takes up most of the northwest corner of the county and includes Towamencin, Trappe, Collegeville, Franconia and Upper Hanover. The two candidates in the race, Republican incumbent Raymond Bunt Jr. and Democrat challenger Bernard McCollum, both say that family issues are their priority. But they are faced with the problem of finding money for social programs they consider to be necessary while trying to ease tax burdens.
NEWS
June 23, 1999 | By William Lamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Acting on the advice of a tax-study committee, the North Penn school board likely will let voters decide next fall whether the district will replace much of its property-tax revenue with a new earned-income tax. Board members are divided on the merits of the Taxpayers Local Control Act, also known as the Homestead Act, but most agree that the matter should be put to voters by referendum in the Nov. 2 municipal elections. The board has until Aug. 2 to approve a ballot question and likely will do so July 15, board members said.
NEWS
September 16, 1999 | By Michael Stoll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The school district is studying the possibility of imposing an earned-income tax - on top of property taxes - though officials emphasize that they are not enthusiastic about the idea. Operating under a 1998 state law, the school board on Tuesday nightannounced the creation of a citizen study commission to propose alternative taxes. Under the local tax-reform legislation, known as Act 50 or the Homestead Act, school districts can give homeowners a property tax rebate up to half the median tax bill.
NEWS
September 10, 1997 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A five-year teachers' contract that provides minimum annual raises of 2 to 2.75 percent was ratified last night by the Neshaminy school board. The approval came more than two months after the previous contract expired and one day after the teachers' union overwhelmingly ratified the agreement. The board vote was 6-3. The contract will increase operating costs for the school district by about $2 million each year, officials said. They estimated that property taxes would increase, on average, at least $75 a year.
NEWS
February 14, 1999 | By Matt Stearns, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was supposed to bring long-awaited property-tax relief to homeowners by shifting the heavy burden of financing public education onto income taxes. But almost a year after the Taxpayers Local Control Act, also known as the Homestead Act, passed muster in Harrisburg in April, it has landed with a resounding thud in Pennsylvania's 500 eligible school districts. (The law specifically excludes Philadelphia.) As of last week, not a single district had opted to shift to the earned-income-tax-based system proposed under the law, according to the Pennsylvania School Boards Association.
NEWS
December 21, 1999 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last week, Dave DiSipio received a mysterious letter from the Delaware County tax assessment office. The envelope, which went to all of the county's 183,000 residential-property owners, contained an application for a "homestead property-tax exclusion. " But it did not clearly explain what that was. DiSipio, who owns a home in Media, was confused. Should he send it in or not? The answer, say county officials, is yes. Just in case. There is a chance it could bring the homeowner a property-tax reduction.
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | By Erin Carroll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It is touted as a hearing on a controversial proposal for a school-district-wide tax restructuring. Residents who come to the high school tonight to voice their opinion on a proposed 0.25 percent earned income tax and homestead exclusion, however, probably will be speaking to a moot issue. Bill Del Collo, school board president, and three other board members opposed to the tax proposal may have killed it at Monday night's board meeting by delaying a vote until after the November election.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 3, 2011
Mark Greenbaum is a freelance writer in Washington One hundred and fifty years ago, on July 4, 1861, Abraham Lincoln appeared before a special session of Congress to steel the nation for the difficult road ahead. The president declared the fight with the rebellious South "a people's contest . . . to afford all, an unfettered start, and a fair chance, in the race of life. " The legislature Lincoln addressed that dark Independence Day was the 37th Congress, one of the most remarkable and productive in American history.
NEWS
December 21, 1999 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last week, Dave DiSipio received a mysterious letter from the Delaware County tax assessment office. The envelope, which went to all of the county's 183,000 residential-property owners, contained an application for a "homestead property-tax exclusion. " But it did not clearly explain what that was. DiSipio, who owns a home in Media, was confused. Should he send it in or not? The answer, say county officials, is yes. Just in case. There is a chance it could bring the homeowner a property-tax reduction.
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | By Erin Carroll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It is touted as a hearing on a controversial proposal for a school-district-wide tax restructuring. Residents who come to the high school tonight to voice their opinion on a proposed 0.25 percent earned income tax and homestead exclusion, however, probably will be speaking to a moot issue. Bill Del Collo, school board president, and three other board members opposed to the tax proposal may have killed it at Monday night's board meeting by delaying a vote until after the November election.
NEWS
September 16, 1999 | By Michael Stoll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The school district is studying the possibility of imposing an earned-income tax - on top of property taxes - though officials emphasize that they are not enthusiastic about the idea. Operating under a 1998 state law, the school board on Tuesday nightannounced the creation of a citizen study commission to propose alternative taxes. Under the local tax-reform legislation, known as Act 50 or the Homestead Act, school districts can give homeowners a property tax rebate up to half the median tax bill.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | By William Lamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The North Penn School District would find itself nearly $6 million short of revenue in three years if voters approved a referendum to cut property taxes and levy a new earned-income tax, according to financial projections circulated among school board members this week. The board is considering whether to put to voters in the fall the option of adopting the Taxpayers Local Control Act, also known as Act 50 or the Homestead Act. That debate is expected to continue at tonight's school board meeting and at a public hearing scheduled for July 29. A five-year projection prepared by James J. Sauers, the district's interim finance director, and distributed to school board members Monday buoyed those who have called the law an ill-conceived boondoggle.
NEWS
July 12, 1999 | By William Lamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The North Penn school board likely will approve a ballot question at a special July 29 meeting that would let voters decide whether the district should shift much of its tax burden from property taxes to a new levy on earned income. North Penn is one of only four Pennsylvania school districts giving serious consideration this year to the Taxpayers Local Control Act, also known as the Homestead Act. The 1998 law allows school districts, which rely largely on property taxes to pay for education, to exclude from taxation a portion of the assessed value of a homeowner's primary residence.
NEWS
June 23, 1999 | By William Lamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Acting on the advice of a tax-study committee, the North Penn school board likely will let voters decide next fall whether the district will replace much of its property-tax revenue with a new earned-income tax. Board members are divided on the merits of the Taxpayers Local Control Act, also known as the Homestead Act, but most agree that the matter should be put to voters by referendum in the Nov. 2 municipal elections. The board has until Aug. 2 to approve a ballot question and likely will do so July 15, board members said.
NEWS
February 14, 1999 | By Matt Stearns, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was supposed to bring long-awaited property-tax relief to homeowners by shifting the heavy burden of financing public education onto income taxes. But almost a year after the Taxpayers Local Control Act, also known as the Homestead Act, passed muster in Harrisburg in April, it has landed with a resounding thud in Pennsylvania's 500 eligible school districts. (The law specifically excludes Philadelphia.) As of last week, not a single district had opted to shift to the earned-income-tax-based system proposed under the law, according to the Pennsylvania School Boards Association.
NEWS
September 10, 1997 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A five-year teachers' contract that provides minimum annual raises of 2 to 2.75 percent was ratified last night by the Neshaminy school board. The approval came more than two months after the previous contract expired and one day after the teachers' union overwhelmingly ratified the agreement. The board vote was 6-3. The contract will increase operating costs for the school district by about $2 million each year, officials said. They estimated that property taxes would increase, on average, at least $75 a year.
NEWS
May 6, 1997 | By Natalie Kostelni, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
With new developments popping up and open space being gobbled up, two candidates for supervisor in the May 20 primary have one thing on their minds: managing growth. In November, voters approved expanding the Board of Supervisors by two, opening one six-year seat and one four-year seat. In the primary, Debby L. Penrod and Pamela C. Ricci will vie for the Republican nomination for the four-year slot; Mark D. West is the lone Democrat seeking this post. Either Penrod or Ricci might become the first female supervisor in recent memory.
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