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NEWS
September 1, 2012 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
During their early school years, Linda Dwoskin's two girls did their homework in a spare room off the main living area of their Dresher house, mainly so Dwoskin could lend a hand if needed. The computers were there - allowing Dwoskin to monitor the girls' use - as well as a mishmash of collected tables and beloved books. But when the girls were nearing high school four years ago, Dwoskin decided to update the 11-by-14-foot room into a stylish homework center. In came two handsome built-in desks, one for each daughter, with cabinetry for storing supplies.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Homework. Students complain about it, forget it, borrow it and conveniently lose it. Some even do it. But is it really important? Several area educators say yes. "There's a great need for homework assignments," said Ray Betz, a guidance counselor at Marple Newtown High School. "Homework reinforces and supports what has been covered in the classroom. "It's also good training for valuable use of time in preparation for the many hours the student will put in in college," he said.
NEWS
October 11, 2002 | By WILLIAM SORENSEN
IF YOU'RE A parent with a child in school, early fall is the time of year when you may find yourself wondering this: Why, at my age - in my case, over 40 - am I still doing homework? Who decided that parents must oversee every book report, give practice spelling tests and correct long division? Our parents never helped with homework. They sipped gimlets or watched Walter Cronkite while we toiled away in our bedrooms, conjugating verbs. Yet even as parents complain, most still sit down with their kids every night, convinced that across the street there's a dad or a mom diligently finding a square root.
NEWS
March 22, 1993 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
No one leaves the after-school tutorial program at the Schuylkill Falls public housing development without finishing his homework. And it suits the children just fine. Every weekday from 3 to 6 p.m., children ages 5 to 13 clamber into the tenant council office in East Falls to get help with their homework. Seated at several long tables, the children complete their assignments under the watchful eyes of volunteer tutors. A student who has serious difficulty on an assignment often receives one-on-one attention from a tutor.
NEWS
September 1, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
The cricket hidden in the Upper Dublin school board room fell silent half- way into the meeting, but the school directors continued talking about end- of-summer business until 11 p.m. At the three-hour meeting Monday night, the board approved 19 curriculum- related items, awarded contracts for purchasing supplies and furniture, authorized additional renovation and construction work for several schools and approved the school board's goals for...
NEWS
June 24, 2013
D EAR HARRY: I think of myself and my family as middle-class Americans. We live in a rowhouse in the Northeast. I work in a factory, my wife cares for our home and kids, we belong to a church, I love to watch our sports teams, we pay our taxes without grumbling, we love our parks, we drive a Ford, we buy at Walmart and Macy's, our kids go to public schools. Our son came home from school last Friday with an assignment about the post-WWII history of the U.S. income tax. We always discuss our kids' homework with them, so we got into a good one on Sunday.
NEWS
January 9, 2004 | By DOM GIORDANO
THE STATE of California has long been a source of nutbag ideas (just witness the recent gubernatorial recall fiasco). One of the state's most absurd actions came when the legislature banned homework in the early 20th century as part of the Progressive movement. As ridiculous as that sounds, there is a growing chorus of parents, edu-crats and so-called parenting experts who are trying to revive this flawed concept. Homework backlash has gotten tremendous media coverage recently.
NEWS
September 10, 2002
Thanks for printing the Sept. 4 letter "Summer homework is fine, but don't overdo it," which expressed concern about Cherry Hill High School East's intensive use of summer homework. I asked about 60 college students how much time they had spent on homework in high school. Most had spent five to 10 hours per week. One had spent more than 15 hours per week. That student had attended Cherry Hill East. Still, it is true that the New Jersey Monthly's rankings of state high schools and achievement have seen East's position fall over the past few years from No. 18 to No. 81. This is well below many other schools with lower socioeconomic status.
LIVING
August 20, 2000 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Courtni Matthews, no doubt, will have a lot of homework this school year, too. Last year at A.B. Day School in Germantown, she was expected to practice writing words and sentences. Complete math worksheets. Read a simple book. Keep a journal. And she had to complete special projects, such as monitoring the growth of a plant. All this, a single day's worth of homework. Courtni was a kindergartner. "The intensity of homework has definitely changed," said Courtni's mother, Diane Matthews, a secretary in the Philadelphia Home and School office who lives in East Mount Airy.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | by Ronnie Eisenberg and Kate Kelly, Special to the Daily News From "Organize Your Family." Copyright 1993 Ronnie Eisenberg with Kate Kelly. Just published by Hyperion
Family stress over homework is legendary. Whether you're encouraging an overtired first-grader to take "just one more look" at the addition problems or demanding that your 11-year-old turn off the television until after schoolwork is done, supervising homework can be very time-consuming for parents. If you establish a specific homework routine for your children, the entire family will benefit. You'll save time, and your efforts will help instill in your children productive work habits and an organized approach to problem- solving.
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SPORTS
May 16, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
CHICAGO - It's an "all-in" situation in which the 76ers find themselves now, so it is not surprising that general manager Sam Hinkie, coach Brett Brown, at least some of his coaching staff and some of the organization's scouts will unite for the all-important rookie combine, which will take place just outside here at a gym owned by Michael Jordan's former trainer. Once workouts start at Attack Athletics, however, expect the Sixers' organizational team to divide and conquer much of the time.
NEWS
June 24, 2013
D EAR HARRY: I think of myself and my family as middle-class Americans. We live in a rowhouse in the Northeast. I work in a factory, my wife cares for our home and kids, we belong to a church, I love to watch our sports teams, we pay our taxes without grumbling, we love our parks, we drive a Ford, we buy at Walmart and Macy's, our kids go to public schools. Our son came home from school last Friday with an assignment about the post-WWII history of the U.S. income tax. We always discuss our kids' homework with them, so we got into a good one on Sunday.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | BY G. MONTGOMERY WATSON, For the Daily News
EDITOR'S NOTE: G. Montgomery Watson of Lower Merion, who taught high school in the Philadelphia School District for 30 years, was employed on the event staff at the Players' House for the U.S. Open. Here's her diary of the experience: Day 1 Objective: To see Tiger and understand how the game of golf is played. Lesson Learned: Four women were selected to work inside the Players' House. The minute I saw the guy who introduced himself as our boss look at the shapely derriere of one of the ladies, I knew I was headed to the hallway leading to the latrines.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: How do you tell someone you love that you think they might have a psychiatric issue that needs to be addressed, i.e., crippling anxiety? My boyfriend keeps saying he doesn't want to get married until he's ready to have kids because he's stressed out all the time. However, he won't do anything to alleviate the stress except to suggest moving across the country, where he has never lived, because the nice weather will make all of his problems go away. I think it's horse-pucky.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Viola says he's not much of a golf fan. That said, he's been to the last two U.S. Open tournaments, in Washington and San Francisco, and this year he'll be watching intently as the nation's championship descends on Merion Golf Course. That interest is explained by his job. Haverford Township's deputy police chief, Viola has been involved in planning the logistics around Merion's Open for about two years. And that task led the U.S. Golf Association to cover the costs for him and a contingent of other local officials to visit the last two championships.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Hillary Siegel, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Gwynedd Mercy Academy High School, the girls study the usual subjects: math, history, English. They also learn about ministry, service, and the teachings of the Sisters of Mercy. In a new class designed by the school's head of ministry and service, Amy Cedrone Cymerman, 12 seniors go outside the classroom and volunteer at a North Philadelphia school for low-income students. Gwynedd Mercy, an all-girls private school in Gwynedd Valley, focuses on the spirit of compassion and ministry based on the teachings of Catherine McAuley, the founder of the Sisters of Mercy.
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
SHORTLY AFTER 3 o'clock on a Thursday afternoon, two girls sit at a table doing their homework in a building that for nearly 40 years was a popular corner bar in Strawberry Mansion. Over the next 10 to 15 minutes, about a dozen more children, most of them boys ages 8 to 13, come bustling through the door in groups of twos and threes. "Hi, Mr. Kev," they say to Kevin Upshur, founder of the Strawberry Mansion Community Learning Center. "You got your homework?" Upshur asks. "Sit down and get your homework done.
SPORTS
January 3, 2013 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Columnist
THE SUPPOSITION is that a team quickly will hire Andy Reid as its head coach for next season. Arizona appears eager to be that team. Arizona, the team that handed the Eagles three of their more painful losses since December of 2008; the team that visits Lincoln Financial Field this year. Can't beat 'em, join 'em. Let this serve as the Cardinals' caution, then: Reid was fired Monday because he authored the most absurd season a head coach has produced in recent professional sports history.
SPORTS
December 18, 2012 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
TWO WEEKS AGO, Ruben Amaro Jr. and the Phillies brass arrived at the winter meetings with a formidable task at hand: After 2 months of inactivity and with 2 months before the start of spring training, management had to address the glaring holes on the roster. Panic began to set in with fans when the same brass prepared to leave Nashville with those same glaring holes unfilled. But in a 10-day span since he walked out of the doors of the Opryland Hotel, Amaro quickly and diligently has taken care of business.
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even in his most hyper moments, 6-year-old Dominick Andujar, who preferred break dancing and wrestling to homework, would stop whatever he was doing if he knew his mother was sick or needed help. "He was my little man . . . my son, my everything," Debbie Burgos, 34, of Camden, said. Dominick promised Burgos in August he would protect her if anyone ever tried to hurt her. She never expected that a few days after Dominick made that vow, he would act the hero and die for it. Just after midnight Sept.
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