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Honduras

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NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By JIM DRINKARD, Daily News Staff Writer
Members of Congress expressed skepticism today about whether the reported Nicaraguan military incursion into neighboring Honduras is as large or as threatening as the Reagan administration claims. Senate Majority Leader Robert Byrd called President Reagan's decision to send 3,200 U.S. troops to Honduras an "overreaction," and a number of other legislators said they were still waiting for hard evidence from the White House to back up its claims. "We've heard the administration cry, 'Wolf, wolf,' before," Byrd, D- W.Va.
NEWS
October 20, 1988 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 21, Santos Fonesca Martinez is just beginning his life. Until now, Martinez, an orphan from Honduras, had lived with the prospect of dying. But now, all of his life is ahead of him. Martinez survived a complicated liver transplant in March, went through two more operations and spent the last few months recovering. Now he is well and will return to Honduras tomorrow. "He's been getting stronger and healthier every day," said Juan Guerra, who brought Martinez to the United States last year for medical care.
NEWS
March 20, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Four people were taken into custody briefly yesterday during a demonstration at McGuire Air Force Base protesting the sending of American troops into Honduras. About 100 protesters gathered at the base at noon, singing "We Shall Overcome. " One of the picket signs said, "Be all you can be, don't go to Nicaragua. " "We think it is outrageous that the President is sending in troops," said Barbra Apfelbaum, coordinator of the New Jersey Central America Network. Apfelbaum said the Reagan administration had shown "contempt for Congress, the Constitution and the American public" by deploying the troops last week.
NEWS
November 18, 1998 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
North Coventry Elementary School in the Owen J. Roberts School District is serving as a drop-off site for donations to be shipped to Honduras, where tens of thousands of people are recovering from the effects of Hurricane Mitch. The effort was headed by principal Barry Flicker and parent Debbie Bissland. Bissland's son, Cory, who is a second grader at the school, was born in Honduras while his mother was living there for a year. Bissland, who has family and friends living in Honduras, said that when her son saw images of the devastation on the news, he felt compelled to do something to help.
NEWS
February 26, 1999 | By William Lamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Forty-five area Air Force reservists are scheduled to leave their homes and jobs temporarily, beginning tonight, for a makeshift tent village on the banks of the Ulua River in northwestern Honduras. They will participate in continuing efforts to rebuild infrastructure destroyed last year by Hurricane Mitch. The reservists, from the 913th Civil Engineering Squadron based at Willow Grove Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base, will work for two weeks to build a two-room, cinderblock elementary school in the town of El Progresso.
NEWS
December 9, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A Philadelphia lawmaker accused the state adjutant general yesterday of deceiving her about the use of Pennsylvania National Guard troops in Central America and urged Gov. Casey to halt their further deployment. Rep. Babette Josephs (D., Phila.) said that Maj. Gen. Gerald T. Sajer informed her in a March letter that no plans existed for Army and Air National Guard units to send troops to Honduras during the remainder of 1987. Since then, however, units from Coraopolis and Reading have been dispatched to Central America, and another from Hazleton will go to Honduras later this week.
NEWS
November 15, 1998 | Inquirer photographs by Michael S. Wirtz
Hurricane Mitch killed 10,000 in Honduras and Nicaragua, but it also left victims among the living. Efforts are focusing on reburying or incinerating the dead to avoid epidemics, and on simply surviving.
NEWS
March 22, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
Ten paratroopers of the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division were injured yesterday when their helicopter crashed in thick jungle while on joint training maneuvers with the Honduran armed forces. No one was killed, the U.S. military command here said. The injured men were taken to Palmerola Air Base, center of U.S. military operations in Honduras. Two underwent surgery but all 10 were reported in good to excellent condition. Gary Hovatter, public relations director for the U.S. military in Honduras, today said five or six of the 10 soldiers could be released to light duty.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
MACUELIZO, Honduras - "My dad died. I don't know my mother," said Gilberto Perdomo, 22, as he slalomed a white minivan around potholes on a rutted dirt road. Nicknamed "Chango," Spanish slang for monkey , Perdomo is among the oldest orphans at Amigos de Jesus, a children's home created here by a Catholic priest, a dedicated lay couple, and with faith-driven support - all from greater Philadelphia. The Christian cross atop the hill at the Honduran home's 42-acre campus is a Villanova University creation.
NEWS
March 19, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services Inquirer staff writer Loretta Tofani contributed to this article
U.S. infantry and paratroop units fanned out around Honduras for exercises yesterday, and U.S. officials said that they were staying well away from combat zones along the Nicaraguan-Honduran border and that the operation might be over within 10 days. But Honduran President Jose Azcona Hoyo has formally requested U.S. helicopters to ferry his troops to the border region, Reagan administration officials in Washington told United Press International last night. The officials said that it was understood that President Reagan would have to decide whether to grant the request, and that any helicopters to be used would come from the U.S. Southern Command in Panama.
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NEWS
October 21, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seated at the defense table in U.S. Immigration Court in Philadelphia, the 10-year-old looked down at his feet, which barely reached the floor. Coal-eyed, he resembled a Latino Dennis the Menace, with a "fauxhawk" instead of a cowlick and clad in a shirt that read: Last name: Maker. First name: Trouble. Having entered the U.S. illegally eight months ago, the boy, Carlos, was arrested on the Texas border, given a notice to appear in court to face deportation, and sent to live with his mother in Kensington while his case plays out. As with other juveniles in this article, The Inquirer agreed to use only his first name.
NEWS
October 4, 2014
ISSUE | ISIS ET AL Try containment Trudy Rubin, not surprisingly, has it just right regarding how to deal with the Islamic State, and more broadly the entire issue of violent destabilization, by suggesting that the long-term solution is not military ("Can Obama achieve his objectives in battle with ISIS?" Sept. 28). Limiting terrorism so effectively that it becomes of little concern requires creating an environment in which people are less desperate. As the rich get richer and the poor poorer, as the haves have more and the have-nots have even less, as the free abuse their liberty and the exploited see decreasing opportunity, the only direction in which the world will go is toward horrific environments.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
MACUELIZO, Honduras - "My dad died. I don't know my mother," said Gilberto Perdomo, 22, as he slalomed a white minivan around potholes on a rutted dirt road. Nicknamed "Chango," Spanish slang for monkey , Perdomo is among the oldest orphans at Amigos de Jesus, a children's home created here by a Catholic priest, a dedicated lay couple, and with faith-driven support - all from greater Philadelphia. The Christian cross atop the hill at the Honduran home's 42-acre campus is a Villanova University creation.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
SAN PEDRO SULA, Honduras - Shot twice in the face by two men on bicycles as he changed a car tire, Omar Gabaretta, 34, died Sunday and was brought to the morgue in this steamy city, which has the world's highest homicide rate. On Monday, his cousin Claudia, 28 and pregnant, went there in a red pickup with a simple, black-painted coffin to claim his body. Distraught and not eager to talk, she said she did not know why her cousin, a machinist, was killed. He was the first in his family to die violently, she said, and he now is part of a familiar story.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
His mother sells empanadas from their home in Honduras. He shines shoes - $5 a day. Add to their woes the constant threats: Join or be killed by deadly gangs. Now, gap-toothed Kevin, 14, is atop a speeding Mexican train called "the Beast," aiming to cross the U.S. border illegally, to face new uncertainties amid the "big towers" and "great cities" he sees on TV. Officials say tens of thousands of children like him are fleeing Central America, primarily Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador.
NEWS
June 28, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Bucks County native and his crewmates from a shipwreck-salvage team, jailed in Honduras since May, were released Thursday, his lawyer and a local representative said. The release of the crew ended an ordeal that kept their families on edge and attracted the attention of federal lawmakers. Devon Butler, 27, of Doylestown, was arrested May 5 when a ship carrying him and five others arrived in the coastal town of Puerto Lempira, according to reports. Honduran authorities arrested all six on smuggling allegations after finding guns aboard the ship, and their detention was upheld during two hearings over 10 days.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Allison Steele and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
The man charged with raping a woman in her Rittenhouse Square apartment last weekend was caught illegally entering the country from Mexico last year, according to customs officials. No criminal charges were filed against Milton Mateo Garcia at the time, records show. Garcia, whom federal authorities identified as Milton Garcia-Vazquez, is from Honduras and was deported in June 2013, said Gillian Christensen, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. It is unclear when Garcia returned to the United States, but until this week he had worked in the kitchens of three local restaurants for several months.
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Long, grueling months of World Cup planning and preparation paid off big for the Germans this week. For the soccer team, sure. It thrashed Portugal. But on a local level, too - for the Brauhaus Schmitz restaurant on South Street. Before the doors opened Monday, the venue's owners devised and implemented a special flat-fee admission plan. Work schedules were checked and rechecked, advertising booked and delivered. Staffers hung extra big-screen TVs and decorated the restaurant in Deutschland banners of black, red, and gold.
SPORTS
May 25, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
JURGEN KLINSMANN was not hired as manager of the U.S. senior men's soccer team to necessarily adhere to the status quo. Shaking things up was almost a mandate for the German-born coach, who won a World Cup as a player and managed Germany to a third-place finish in another. So while, Klinsmann made the shocking move to leave the U.S. all-time leading scorer and most recognizable name off the team that will travel to Brazil next month for the 2014 World Cup, it was not unpredictable.
NEWS
May 1, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Sara Navarro, being undocumented used to feel a lot like being hunted. That changed in 2012, with the implementation of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), which gave temporary protection to certain immigrants who were brought here illegally by their parents before age 16. "It definitely feels different," said Navarro, of North Philadelphia, who was 11 when she emigrated from Honduras. "Now, we don't have to watch our backs. We can live with our parents, and they can't deport us. " But it was a bittersweet victory.
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