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NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Jia Lynn Yang, Washington Post
HONG KONG - Edward Snowden's surprising exit from this city was prompted by a mysterious messenger who relayed to the former contractor that he should leave Hong Kong - and that if he tried to go, he would not be stopped, one of his lawyers said Monday. Unsure whether to trust this person but aware that his options were dwindling, Snowden decided to go for it, said the lawyer, Albert Ho. On Sunday morning, the 30-year-old American, who leaked top-secret U.S. documents, went to the airport with another of his lawyers, used his own passport, and boarded an Aeroflot flight to Moscow without special assistance, according to Ho, all while plainclothes police officers hovered around him. The circumstances of Snowden's departure from Hong Kong have baffled lawmakers and legal experts here who expected a drawn-out battle in the courts of this semiautonomous region.
NEWS
March 6, 1989 | By STANLEY NEWMAN
In just eight years a phenomenon of British history that began in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776, will play out once again in a tiny enclave of spectacularly beautiful, rock-strewn terrain on the edge of the Chinese mainland. After a span of almost 221 years, Hong Kong - the last of Britain's crown colonies - will, like America, unhook its bonds to Britain. But the similarities end there. For starters, unlike the United States, whose Declaration of Independence still inspires freedom-loving people around the world, Britain's departure from Hong Kong after 150 years is not a result of the freely expressed desire of Hong Kong's inhabitants.
NEWS
March 6, 1989 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Record numbers of people are doing it. Everyone else is talking about it. Some are paying big bucks for expert advice on how to do it. And thousands more are reading a new magazine all about where to do it. What is this latest social craze? Drugs, sex, travel, fashion? No, this is Hong Kong, and the big thing on everybody's mind these days - after making money, of course - is leaving. Emigration fever is gripping this British colony as the countdown continues to 1997, the year Britain hands over sovereignty to China after 156 years of rule.
NEWS
January 8, 2007
RE RIVER City: Once again, certain pseudo-intellectuals and their political mouthpieces hang out the sign "Visionary Developers and Those Who Would Create Thousands of Jobs Stay Away from Philadelphia!" If it weren't so insane, it'd be laughable. Critics call River City "Hong Kong on the Schuylkill," but are they aware that Hong Kong is one of the world's most beautiful cities? As for those who say it would block out the sun,I guess DaVinci was wrong, and the earth and sun are stationary.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1999 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Stanley Kwan's melancholy romance Hold You Tight is set in 1997, on the eve of Britain's return of Hong Kong to China. A nocturnal confessional populated by barflies and bed-hoppers, the film is crammed with characters confronting personal loss that is compounded by the looming loss of their Hong Kong. At the airport, two women (played by the same actress, Chingmy Yau) are in line to catch a flight for Taipei. Because one, Rosa Gao, has mislaid her passport, she cannot board. The other, Ah Moon, gets on the plane and dies when it crashes.
FOOD
November 1, 1992 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Tsui Hang Chun, Chinatown's newest seafood restaurant, was named for a famous restaurant in Hong Kong, says owner Yen Fai Wong. The name isn't the only thing that came from that exciting city. Tsui Hang Chun's chef is newly arrived from there as well and, at his insistence, Wong imported much of the restaurant's kitchen equipment. That's a lot of effort, but it appears to have paid off. A friend who grew up in Hong Kong says that Tsui Hang Chun is right on target, that her recent meal there tasted like food from home.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Once again, as we have seen so frequently and so recently in many countries, massive crowds of young people are demonstrating for democracy against a repressive government. This time the civic protests are ongoing in downtown Hong Kong. As in Cairo's Tahrir Square in 2011, or in the early days of Syria's uprising, or last fall in Kiev, or in Moscow's Pushkin Square in 2012, the crowd is predominantly youthful and nonviolent - and it has no clear leaders. Its participants are so earnest that they clean up the trash and separate plastic and paper for recycling.
NEWS
March 28, 1989 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 26,000 Vietnamese boat people in crowded refugee camps are straining Hong Kong's commitment to care for them and forcing government officials to advocate the return of thousands to Vietnam against their will. After a heavy and unexpected influx of boat people last year, Hong Kong now has more Vietnamese refugees than does any other place in Southeast Asia. "They are people," Hong Kong Governor Sir David Wilson has said, "on a journey to nowhere. " Hong Kong has instituted a screening policy for Vietnamese boat people to distinguish "political refugees" from "economic migrants" - an approach endorsed this month by the six-member Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | By Gareth C.C. Chang
At 6, I got my first glimpse of Hong Kong from the window of a DC-3: It was a shimmering island below me. As a refugee from the Communist revolution - both my parents were senior military officers in the Chinese Nationalist Army - I would make Hong Kong my home for the next 10 years. Even today, as an American businessman, I think of Hong Kong as home. I've lived there off and on in the pursuit of business, and for a time was chairman of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong.
NEWS
January 17, 1996 | by MARK DE LA VINA, Daily News Staff Writer
erever you turn, visions of Hong Kong cinema are high-kicking like Shaolin monks throughout American popular culture. In "Batman Forever," Chris O'Donnell does the laundry like a Kung Fu master in a scene inspired by the Hong Kong movie "Dreadnought. " And in rap music, the group Wu-Tang Clan, which tried to enlist action director John Woo for one of its videos, borrowed its name from the vaunted martial arts group depicted in many period movies. Through Jan. 29, the Neighborhood Film/Video Project at International House goes straight to the well when it presents eight Hong Kong movies that range from action-crammed fests that would make Arnold Schwarzenegger whimper to heart-tweaking melodramas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Film Festival isn't limited to charming romcoms, foreign art pictures, and earnest documentaries. Cineastes looking for edgier material will find it in PFF's Graveyard Shift, a program of seven genre offerings from around the world, including a Hitchcockian police thriller from South Korea ( A Hard Day ), a Norwegian black comedy ( In Order of Disappearance ), a New Zealand shocker about a creature who lives inside someone's house ( Housebound ), not to mention a couple of homegrown horror flicks.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Once again, as we have seen so frequently and so recently in many countries, massive crowds of young people are demonstrating for democracy against a repressive government. This time the civic protests are ongoing in downtown Hong Kong. As in Cairo's Tahrir Square in 2011, or in the early days of Syria's uprising, or last fall in Kiev, or in Moscow's Pushkin Square in 2012, the crowd is predominantly youthful and nonviolent - and it has no clear leaders. Its participants are so earnest that they clean up the trash and separate plastic and paper for recycling.
TRAVEL
September 21, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Staff Writer
MACAU - Turquoise seas, sky dotted with pink-tinged evening clouds, bridges crossing waterways that fade into mist, Las Vegas-on-acid architecture - it was all there below from the superb vantage point of the top of Macau Tower, all so inviting you could jump in headfirst. Some 80 people a day do just that here at the highest commercial-bungee-jumping site in the world - 764 feet. While some people associate bungee jumping with possible sudden death, it is, like so many things in Macau, a party, with club music, free Heineken, and smiling explanations of why there's no danger in plunging toward the ground face-first - even though every cell in your body says the opposite.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
COME September, M. Night Shyamalan is expected to be shooting again in Philadelphia. And he's bringing Bruce Willis with him. Deadline.com reports that the director and star behind "The Sixth Sense" and "Unbreakable" will reteam for "Labor of Love," from a script a young Shyamalan sold to 20th Century Fox in 1993 that has remained unproduced. A hint that the script has been sitting on the shelf awhile? Willis will play the owner of a Philadelphia book store whose wife dies in a tragic accident.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The phone call came in the middle of dinner, and just a simple sentence was said: "I think I've found your house. " That was in 1986, and Frank and Dottie Giordano, then living in Cherry Hill, were in their 10th year of searching for a home in Moorestown. The Giordanos were determined - it had to be a special house in a town where they wanted their children in school. Something in the real estate agent's voice gave them a sense that perhaps their search was finally over, and they headed to the address that night.
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | BY JAD SLEIMAN, Daily News Staff Writer sleimaj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
FROM Philadelphia to the Philippines, a young sailor is showing some brotherly love. Typhoon Haiyan swept across the South Pacific nation Nov. 8, killing nearly 4,000 people and displacing 4 million others. The USS George Washington was on the scene less than a week later. Petty Officer 3rd Class Robert Nurse of Philly is among the 5,500 sailors onboard the nuclear-powered supercarrier. "It's amazing to be able to help out. One minute we're in Hong Kong, the next we're here," he said by phone from the Philippine Sea. "It feels awesome to be able to assist people in need.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four decades have passed since his death in July 1973 at the age of 32, yet Bruce Lee remains one of the most potent and relevant forces in martial arts and their depiction in film. Interest has even extended to his teacher, whose story is told in the Donnie Yen film Ip Man . Lee, who entered the American popular imagination as early as 1966 as Kato on ABC's The Green Hornet , made only one Hollywood film, Warner Bros.' 1973 masterpiece Enter the Dragon . The kung fu master went to Hollywood after striking gold in Hong Kong with three classic martial arts films - The Big Boss , Fist of Fury , and The Way of the Dragon . At his death, he also had shot 100 minutes of a fourth, Game of Death . It was later completed with footage from other films and new shots featuring a Lee look-alike.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Female TV cops have come a long way since Angie Dickinson's Police Woman and that 1980s staple Cagney & Lacey . Witness Irene Huss, a detective in the Violent Crimes Unit in the Swedish city of Gothenburg. Sure, she's a dependable wife and mom - she's married to a chef and restaurateur with whom she has twin teenage girls. But she's also a former European jujitsu champion who can disarm, take down, and restrain a muscle-bound biker in the blink of an eye. Based on a series of novels by Helene Tursten, Detective Inspector Irene Huss is a brilliant Swedish TV series produced by the same company that brought us Wallander and The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo . Each feature-length episode is a mini-saga with several narrative lines, embroiling Huss in complex, sometimes horrific crimes.
NEWS
July 6, 2013
Nina Wang's ex-lover gets jail HONG KONG - The former lover and fortune teller of quirky billionaire Nina Wang was sentenced Friday to 12 years in prison after a Hong Kong court found him guilty of forging a will to claim her multibillion-dollar estate. High Court Justice Andrew Macrae said Peter Chan's attempt to pass himself off as the beneficiary of Nina Wang's fortune, estimated by prosecutors at 83 billion Hong Kong dollars ($10.7 billion), was "shameless, wicked, and born of unparalleled greed.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Kathy Lally and Anthony Faiola, Washington Post
MOSCOW - Edward Snowden, sought on espionage charges after bringing secret U.S. surveillance programs to light, receded still further into the shadows Monday as the United States strenuously called on Russia to turn him over for prosecution. Snowden, 30, a former government contractor who has not been seen in public since he was said to have arrived in Moscow on Sunday after slipping out of Hong Kong, set off a flurry of diplomatic activity around the globe as frustrated U.S. officials tried to interrupt his flight to asylum.
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