CollectionsHope Vi
IN THE NEWS

Hope Vi

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 4, 2002 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Camden Housing Authority is applying to the federal government for its third Hope VI grant in less than a decade, officials said yesterday. If the agency wins the $20 million grant for demolishing and redeveloping the Roosevelt Manor low-rise housing project in the city's Centerville section, it will have received nearly $100 million in Hope VI grants in nine years. The previous grants were $42 million in 1993 for the Peter J. McGuire Gardens and $35 million in 2000 for Westfield Acres, renamed Baldwin's Run. Tomorrow, City Council is expected to help move the application along by giving its final nod to an ordinance that would give developers of the project an option to buy several adjacent city-owned lots.
NEWS
August 13, 1998 | By Michael Rothfeld, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Not a brick has been laid nor a bit of money spent from last year's $16.4 million federal grant to revitalize housing in this city and South Coatesville. But as the time to begin draws near, there are plenty of ideas - both true and false - about Hope VI, the project that will bring in more money than this area has seen in years. "There's a lot of misconceptions," said Jim Ebi, executive director of Community Builders Inc., a Boston-based developer working with the Chester County Housing Authority.
NEWS
June 20, 1997 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
Plans for a new suburban-style development to replace public housing at Schuylkill Falls depends on winning approval for a $35 million federal grant. It will be the second time at bat for the Schuylkill Falls proposal, which failed when it was submitted last year. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development said the first plan submitted by the Philadelphia Housing Authority was too thin on details and lacked any private investment - which HUD believes is needed to get maximum leverage from the federal dollars.
NEWS
December 22, 1998 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Housing Authority has been awarded $3 million for the demolition of an East Camden housing project. The 18 three-story buildings in the 25-acre Westfield Acres complex are to be demolished in about a year, David A. Brown, executive director of the authority, said yesterday. "We at the Housing Authority are elated about this award," said Brown, who took over the authority last month. "It's a step in the right direction. This is one of the many positive things to come for the residents of this authority.
NEWS
December 29, 1999 | By Michael Rothfeld, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
From a long, narrow office in the heart of downtown Coatesville, Jim Eby spends his days trying to remake the face of the area. To be sure, it is not a glamorous role. As one of the coordinators of Hope VI, a federally funded revitalization project, Eby, 45, is often mired in bureaucratic undertakings such as visits to planning commissions, inspections of housing projects and paperwork. "In one of our newsletters, we joked that what I really do is three-ring binders," Eby said.
NEWS
June 5, 2004 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Camden City Housing Authority has been chosen to receive a $20 million federal HOPE VI grant to jump-start a $150 million revitalization of a large portion of the Centerville section of the city, officials said yesterday. "We're very excited," said Arijit De, executive director of the city's Redevelopment Agency, who worked closely with the Housing Authority to obtain the funding. "It's extremely significant. " In all, 668 affordable apartments and houses, some for rent and others for sale, are planned, and 185 residences in adjacent Everett Gardens are to be rehabilitated, De said.
NEWS
June 28, 2003 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time in her life, Maria Cruz had become a homeowner. She had found the perfect patch of suburbia - in East Camden. One of the city's worst drug corners had been transformed into a collection of blue, yellow and white frame homes with vinyl siding, little green lawns, gardens, and A-frame roofs sloping down to porches with white columns. Cruz, 27, broke down and cried yesterday at the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new homes as she spoke to a group of dignitaries beneath a tent near 31st Street and Westfield Avenue.
NEWS
April 29, 2011
A Camden nonprofit was surprised Thursday with $240,950 from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to provide safe housing to victims of domestic violence and a couple of homeless people. The federal housing officials were in town to tour sites such as Cooper Plaza, the Ferry Avenue Library, and Hope VI projects in the Centerville neighborhood as they get ready to invest more resources into urban communities. Camden is at the top of the list, said Adoldo Carrion Jr., New York and New Jersey region administrator for the department.
NEWS
December 13, 2002 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dalia Rodriguez's lips trembled as she struggled to control her feelings yesterday. "I'm very nervous," the 19-year-old nurse's aide said. Rodriguez was excited about cutting the ribbon to the new two-story cottage for her and her 1-year-old daughter as part of a ceremony to celebrate families moving into 49 new homes in East Camden. The ritual is becoming an increasingly common event in Camden, where there has been a recent housing spurt amid efforts to revitalize the city.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | By Adam L. Cataldo, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In a move to support an application for federal funds, the state plans to provide $33 million for a project to redevelop a huge swath of East Camden. "It's an extra oomph for the application," Jane M. Kenney, commissioner of the state's Department of Community Affairs, said yesterday alongside hollowed-out buildings in the Westfield Acres housing development. Camden has applied for $35 million from the Department of Housing and Urban Development under a program known as Hope VI. The state money would include grants and low-interest construction loans, said Tom Damm, a spokesman for the Department of Community Affairs.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 18, 2012 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
As a city, we're acutely aware of each discrete change to our physical surroundings. A new building rises here, a favorite haunt goes dark and vacant over there. Philadelphia, like all cities, changes little by little. So why, then, do the big, historic transformations so often take us by surprise? Those were my thoughts as I stood at 12th and Catharine Streets, gazing across the impeccable lawn of the new Hawthorne Park, at the tidy rowhouses that now cluster so tightly at its edges.
NEWS
April 29, 2011
A Camden nonprofit was surprised Thursday with $240,950 from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to provide safe housing to victims of domestic violence and a couple of homeless people. The federal housing officials were in town to tour sites such as Cooper Plaza, the Ferry Avenue Library, and Hope VI projects in the Centerville neighborhood as they get ready to invest more resources into urban communities. Camden is at the top of the list, said Adoldo Carrion Jr., New York and New Jersey region administrator for the department.
NEWS
March 4, 2008 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the 1990s, the Chester Housing Authority laid claim to a national reputation: one of the worst public housing agencies - if not the worst - in the country. After decades of struggle, that image is getting rehabilitated, as reflected in the demolition of two dilapidated 15-story towers that for years stood at the entrance to the city's center. The end of the Chester Towers - whose slow but steady destruction is visible to thousands of motorists who travel north every day on I-95 - marks the completion of CHA's overhaul.
NEWS
July 26, 2006 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Add Camden's Housing Authority to the list of troubled agencies in New Jersey's poorest city. With the Police Department reorganizing, the Board of Education rocked by scandal, and a former city councilman tangled in a bribery investigation, questions are swirling around an authority that only two years ago came out of seven years of federal control. The storm developed from a combination of proposed layoffs, a planned trip to Denver by executive director Maria Marquez and five other employees, and questions about whether Marquez allowed her son to live rent-free in an authority property for nearly three years.
NEWS
August 4, 2004 | By Frank Kummer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state agency created to distribute revitalization funds in Camden yesterday approved $7.3 million in aid for three residential developments. The Economic Recovery Board for Camden agreed to a $1.5 million loan to help the Cooper-Grant Neighborhood Association and a developer, Pennrose Properties, build 28 market-rate homes. The $10 million project consists of 16 townhouses and 12 twin houses meant for upper- and middle-income residents. The board is charged with awarding $175 million in loans, grants and other aid in New Jersey's recovery effort for the city.
NEWS
June 5, 2004 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Camden City Housing Authority has been chosen to receive a $20 million federal HOPE VI grant to jump-start a $150 million revitalization of a large portion of the Centerville section of the city, officials said yesterday. "We're very excited," said Arijit De, executive director of the city's Redevelopment Agency, who worked closely with the Housing Authority to obtain the funding. "It's extremely significant. " In all, 668 affordable apartments and houses, some for rent and others for sale, are planned, and 185 residences in adjacent Everett Gardens are to be rehabilitated, De said.
NEWS
March 25, 2004 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Control of the once-troubled Camden Housing Authority will be returned to local officials next month, city officials said yesterday. "I think it's great. . . . We are going to put qualified residents back in control," said Mayor Gwendolyn Faison about the expected transition from federal control. Faison said she was pleased to see one local agency return to city control, following a spate of takeovers of Camden's government institutions that began in 1997, during the administration of Mayor Milton Milan.
NEWS
October 18, 2003 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Celebrating the end of the blighted Schuylkill Falls housing project and the arrival of a sparkling new mixed-income development, residents and officials in East Falls gathered yesterday for the opening of the Falls Ridge housing complex. "This will be the finest mixed-use community in the United States," said Gov. Rendell, addressing about 400 people under a tent at the complex. "Nobody believed we could do it. " Rendell, who has had a home in East Falls for more than 20 years, said: "This is a wonderful, diverse community.
NEWS
June 28, 2003 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time in her life, Maria Cruz had become a homeowner. She had found the perfect patch of suburbia - in East Camden. One of the city's worst drug corners had been transformed into a collection of blue, yellow and white frame homes with vinyl siding, little green lawns, gardens, and A-frame roofs sloping down to porches with white columns. Cruz, 27, broke down and cried yesterday at the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new homes as she spoke to a group of dignitaries beneath a tent near 31st Street and Westfield Avenue.
NEWS
December 13, 2002 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dalia Rodriguez's lips trembled as she struggled to control her feelings yesterday. "I'm very nervous," the 19-year-old nurse's aide said. Rodriguez was excited about cutting the ribbon to the new two-story cottage for her and her 1-year-old daughter as part of a ceremony to celebrate families moving into 49 new homes in East Camden. The ritual is becoming an increasingly common event in Camden, where there has been a recent housing spurt amid efforts to revitalize the city.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|