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SPORTS
August 4, 1987 | By KEVIN MULLIGAN, Daily News Sports Writer
One of America's outstanding male swimmers is an archaeology-anthropology major at Harvard University. Not Pepperdine or Santa Clara or one of those other major Aquaman-producing universities. Harvard. Ivy League. Location: Cambridge, Mass. Not Mission Viejo, Calif., or Boca Raton, Fla. "I didn't want to go to college to be an athlete," said David Berkoff, of Huntingdon Valley. "I wanted to go learn. " That also explains why Berkoff, as a senior at Penn Charter in 1984, turned down full scholarship offers from some of America's most prestigious swimming powers to pay his own way to Harvard.
NEWS
October 30, 1996 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
If you spot a flock of orange-haired women and bizarrely attired young men around town today, don't mark it off to Halloween festivities. Instead, the credit (or blame) belongs to the Philadelphia Music Conference at the Doubletree Hotel, which is expected to lure more than 3,500 music hopefuls and scouts through Saturday. Now the nation's third-biggest music-industry shmooze (after Austin's South by Southwest and New York's CMJ), PMC will feature dozens of how-to-do-it panels (delving into management and publicity, starting your own label and getting a publishing deal)
SPORTS
November 23, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
FORMER COACH Bill Parcells, running back Jerome Bettis and NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue are among 26 modern-era semifinalists for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The list was announced yesterday by the Hall of Fame following a vote by its selection committee. There were 105 preliminary nominees. Among other semifinalists for the Class of 2012 are wide receivers Tim Brown, Cris Carter and Andre Reed, along with former 49ers owner Edward DeBartolo Jr. Former Chiefs guard Will Shields is the only first-year eligible player to make the list.
NEWS
March 8, 2012
S ABRIYA BILAL, a bus driver for the school district, wants to improve the city's representation in Harrisburg but admits that she is still getting the hang of politics. Commonwealth Senior Judge James Gardner Colins yesterday ordered her removed from the April 24 Democratic primary-election ballot for not having enough valid signatures on her nominating petitions. Bilal, who had hoped to challenge state Rep. Dwight Evans in the 203rd Legislative District, was removed from the ballot last year for the same reason, when she tried to run against City Councilwoman Marian Tasco.
SPORTS
September 29, 2009 | By Kevin Tatum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the 76ers set to begin training camp today at St. Joseph's University, four free agents were officially added to the team's roster to bring it to 17 players. That does not mean any of the newcomers will make the team, however. But they were there yesterday when the Sixers held their annual media day at the Wachovia Center. "We have 13 guaranteed contracts, and we may keep 14 [players on the roster]," said Sixers president and general manager Ed Stefanski. "If someone shows in camp, we may keep 14. " Among the hopefuls are shooting guard Dionte Christmas and point guard Sean Singletary, native Philadelphians who played in college at Temple and Virginia, respectively.
NEWS
November 12, 1998 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
Politicians know a winning trend when they see one. Think Minnesota Gov.-elect Jesse "The Body" Ventura is the only elected official with his own action figure toy? Think again. Clout, with the help of cartoonist Signe Wilkinson, has developed action figures for our mayoral candidates. Let's face it, wouldn't they look a lot better in tights, trunks, sequined jackets, bleached hair and feather boas? And wouldn't it save a lot of money and be a lot more fun if we could settle this inside the ring?
NEWS
March 30, 1987 | By MARIA GALLAGHER, Daily News Staff Writer
Too many one-liners and too few issues. That's the way it was Saturday at an hour-long forum featuring the four candidates for mayor, sponsored by the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists. The PABJ somehow persuaded all four to share the same stage - a feat, since the candidates' schedulers usually take care that their speaking times don't overlap. Occasionally, they may be seen pausing to shake hands - if TV cameras are nearby - before sprinting out the nearest exit. This is what happens when they're corralled in the same room: A wound-up Frank L. Rizzo took aim at everybody, calling Edward G. Rendell "a mediocre DA," declaring that Rendell and Mayor Goode "have a tough time telling the truth," and contending that John J. Egan Jr. "couldn't attract a crowd if he stood out there naked.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the start of a Bensalem candidates' forum, mayoral hopeful James McMaster said he and his opponent, Edward F. Burns Jr., had decided to deliver their opening statements sitting down. "It's the one thing we agree on," he said. But during the nearly two-hour program Tuesday, which also featured candidates for council, treasurer and auditor, it was hard to find anything that the two men disagreed on. A trash-to-steam plant in Bensalem? Both are firmly against it. How to increase the township's tax base?
SPORTS
August 18, 2008 | The Inquirer Staff
U.S. medal hopefuls continued to falter yesterday in track and field. Having already failed to advance anyone to the finals of the long jump and discus throw, the U.S. men's team in Beijing was shut out in the 1,500 meters and the high jump. The failures in the 1,500 stung particularly hard since one of the runners, Sudanese refugee Lopez Lomong, was the team's flag-bearer at the opening ceremonies, and another, Bernard Lagat, was the 2007 world champion. Along with former NCAA champion Leonel Manzano, all three were naturalized U.S. citizens with compelling personal stories.
NEWS
December 18, 1991
In the thick of the presidential primaries early next year, the Treasury Department may deny candidates millions of dollars in matching funds. Sure, the money would be provided eventually - probably once the primaries are over - but it wouldn't be there right when it's needed most. In short, the post-Watergate reform that substituted federal funds for huge donations from fat cats is in danger. And you don't have to be a cynic to wonder if partisan politics played a role in this arbitrary ruling by Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady, one of the President's closest friends and advisers.
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SPORTS
February 21, 2015 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The thought - once the AT&T National, a PGA Tour event hosted by Tiger Woods, left Aronimink Golf Club for the last time in 2011 - was that the Newtown Square facility wouldn't entertain another professional golf tournament unless it was a major championship. But when the tour contacted Aronimink last fall and asked club officials their degree of interest in hosting the third of four annual FedEx Cup playoff events, the BMW Championship in 2018, president Steven Zodtner said his immediate reaction was: "Let's talk.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A coalition of civil liberties and antidiscrimination groups has joined with prosecutors, police, medical professionals, and political activists to launch a campaign to make New Jersey the next state in the nation to legalize marijuana. Under the name New Jersey United for Marijuana Reform, the coalition includes the state chapters of the ACLU and the NAACP; Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, and the president of the state Municipal Prosecutors Association, which last year voted in favor of legalization for adults.
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The confirmation e-mails arrived early Tuesday, while the snow still fell, and thousands of credit cards were charged $43. Those coveted bibs - 40,000 in all - for the annual Broad Street Run were distributed through a lottery. Now, for the not-so-lucky, the chase for a spot in the May 3 race begins. Organizers of the largest 10-mile race in the country denied more than ever: About 6,600 entrants lost a chance to run from Broad and Somerville Avenue in Logan to the Navy Yard.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
For George Thomas, owner of the Creative Silver jewelry kiosk in the Gallery, the battle is over. "I'm done," he said Tuesday, as he individually wrapped silver necklaces and chains in tissue paper to transport them to his new store on South Street. Wednesday is the day that the kiosk merchants in the Gallery must pack up their merchandise in advance of renovations at the Center City mall. Even so, the merchants, many of whom have run their kiosks for decades, are hoping for a last-minute reprieve that will allow them to stay open during the renovations, moving around the Gallery as different sections are updated.
SPORTS
February 16, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
March 1997. A South Jersey Group 1 basketball game was scheduled for 7 p.m. at Pitman, and Ron Myers - along with some of his teammates - arrived at the little school on Linden Avenue about 4:30 p.m. "There was a line around the building," Myers said, recalling a magical time in his life and in the history of Pitman basketball. "You drove up with your buddies and you see that and you're like, 'Wow. This is a big deal.' " Myers was standing in a hallway off a locker room below the Cherry Hill East gymnasium Saturday afternoon.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
For their 2016 convention, Democrats picked a city where they have a voter-registration edge of better than 6-1, the political fulcrum of a state that has reliably backed the party's presidential nominees for a generation. Sure, Philadelphia resonates with the symbolism of the nation's founding, but as a purely strategic play, wouldn't it have made more sense to convene in Columbus, in the true swing state of Ohio? Perhaps, some analysts suggested, the third finalist, Brooklyn, N.Y., was rejected because of tension between New York City police officers and liberal Mayor Bill de Blasio - or because the borough's hipsters with their artisanal cheeses wouldn't exactly scream "middle America" on TV. "It's primarily a business decision for us," Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, said Thursday.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Meet Jamison. He was found in Philadelphia in August at 3 weeks of age, weighing less than four pounds, and suffering from parasites, cigarette burns, and seizures. He was rescued to Marlton by a compassionate Christian lady and later adopted by a nice Downingtown couple. Despite a hellish start, he has grown into a happy, friendly fellow with an athletic bent, an open heart, and, oh, what a nose. On Sunday, he goes national. Jamison, a pit bull-boxer mix, is in the starting lineup for Puppy Bowl XI, airing on Animal Planet.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Odette's was once the gateway to New Hope, a lively cabaret bar on the edge of town that for decades epitomized the ebullient spirit of the famously gay-friendly borough. But lately, it's been an eyesore. After being ravaged by floods in 2008, the historic building along the Delaware River has sat vacant with boarded-up windows. A group of local investors is planning to change that. In about two months, they say, work will begin on the Riverhouse at Odette's, a $25 million facility that will bring luxury hotel rooms, a banquet hall, restaurant, and rooftop bar to the 40,000-square-foot property.
SPORTS
January 29, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
THERE ARE only two domains of which to choose from these days for fans of the local hockey team. One is the Land of Hope and Dreams, where impossible or highly improbable are vulgarities better left unspoken, where last night's 4-3 shootout victory over the Arizona Coyotes is viewed as another step in a long climb toward a potential playoff berth. The other is Futureland, occupied by those who see too many flaws in the current team to warrant the optimism needed for that other world.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
YOU WON'T find Shane White, 18, a freshman at Holy Family University in Northeast Philadelphia, giving $5 haircuts, manicures or facials today at Bucks County Technical High School to raise money for City of Hope cancer research. But you will find him working the HopeCuts fundraiser at his Feasterville alma mater, supporting the 50 student barbers and cosmetologists trying to raise more than $10,000 for City of Hope like they did in a snowstorm last year. White's expertise is technology, not cosmetology, so he's been networking for months to spread the word about today's $5 HopeCuts, hoping a good crowd shows up from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. All the money goes to support the famous cancer-research hospital in Los Angeles that has clinical-trial research partnerships with Thomas Jefferson University and other Philadelphia hospitals.
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