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Hopefuls

SPORTS
June 5, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
WITHIN THE SPAN of the first few weeks of action this spring in Clearwater, Fla., two unrelated elements played out on the diamonds at the Carpenter Complex. Despite Maikel Franco's presence in big-league camp, manager Ryne Sandberg said that 24-year-old Cody Asche would see "95 percent" of his work at third base to get him best prepared to be the team's Opening Day third baseman. Only four years earlier, the Phillies used their fourth-round selection in the amateur draft on the University of Nebraska infielder; they needed less than $170,000 to sign him. Across the way, as minor league camp began, the team's top pick from the same draft didn't show up for work.
SPORTS
June 5, 2015 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Columnist
WINNING A single Triple Crown race for a horse trainer is just like winning any golf major or any championship in any team sport. No matter what else happens in a career, only one trophy in horse racing's marquee series is a forever moment. Bob Baffert has won 11 Triple Crown races since 1997 - the Kentucky Derby four times, the Preakness six times, the Belmont Stakes once. To put in perspective how dominant Baffert's stable has been since Silver Charm won the '97 Derby, consider that he has won nearly 20 percent of all Triple Crown races since then (11 of 56)
SPORTS
June 5, 2015 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
THE NHL DRAFT is 22 days away, but there is little intrigue as to how Round 1 will begin on June 26 in Sunrise, Fla. - not with two generational talents who have set themselves apart from the rest. Connor McDavid will go No. 1 to Edmonton. Jack Eichel will quickly follow at No. 2 to Buffalo. After that? Anyone's guess. But with a crop of talent that rivals the all-time deep draft class of 2003 - when the Flyers nabbed Jeff Carter at No. 11 and Mike Richards at No. 24 - the Flyers are in a solid position to pick at No. 7. "I think as a group, this might be as good as that group back in 2003," Flyers director of scouting Chris Pryor said yesterday in a conference call from the draft combine in Buffalo.
SPORTS
June 4, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sebastien Le Toux admits he felt relief Saturday, and for good reason. When the Union midfielder converted an Andrew Wenger feed during a 2-1 loss to D.C. United, he ended a season-long scoring drought. It took 14 games for Le Toux to score his first goal. For someone who had been a double-figure goal scorer in three of his previous four years with the Union, it has been a frustrating season so far. "I hope that goal can get me going and there won't be any more talk of me not scoring," said Le Toux, 31, who has two assists.
SPORTS
June 3, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The quarterback who receives the least amount of attention on the Eagles is the one who has been with the organization the longest. He's the lone quarterback Chip Kelly has ever drafted. And he's the only one who has not been traded or released by a team - or at least not yet. Matt Barkley is entering his third season in Philadelphia. He arrived in 2013 expecting to compete with Michael Vick and Nick Foles for the No. 1 job. He now must hold off Tim Tebow from taking the No. 3 job. "He's not taking my reps on the field," Barkley said.
NEWS
June 2, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
ROSALIA BADHORSE traveled 2,000 miles from the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation to Philadelphia, where she hoped to learn how to help her tribe back home in Montana hill country. After graduating last month from La Salle University with a business degree, Badhorse, 22, wants to create jobs in her hometown of Lame Deer on the reservation, where 78 percent of the people are unemployed. "We have one small grocery store, a gas station, a school, a bank and our little clinic," Badhorse said.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
SLS Hotels puts its chicly designed, lavishly appointed lodgings in the U.S. cities most associated with luxury travel and youthful, free-spending abandon: Beverly Hills. South Beach. Las Vegas. Philadelphia is now on that elite list. After years of planning, work is set to begin in the fall on the 152-guest-room SLS Lux Philadelphia Hotel & Residences. It will rise 47 stories a few blocks south of City Hall and could open as soon as spring 2018. The California-based hotel chain, part of hospitality mogul Sam Nazarian's SBE Entertainment Group, is betting on Philadelphia's budding sophistication as a shopping, dining, and sightseeing destination as it targets moneyed visitors seeking less-staid alternatives to the city's existing stock of high-end accommodations.
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
City Council's website was hijacked for a few hours Wednesday by self-proclaimed "Cyber Commandos" who advised the body, rather helpfully, "Your Security Is Very Low. " Much the same could be said of public opinion of Council, whose troubles go well beyond its poorly guarded online presence. So here's hoping the democratic disruption of Philadelphia's legislature the day before has a more lasting impact than the hackers. Three of the five Democrats nominated for (and practically assured)
SPORTS
May 24, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Notre Dame lacrosse team has a lingering memory of its last trip to the Philadelphia area, and it's not a good one. Three weeks ago, the Irish (12-2) were the top-ranked team in the country. That would have been a surprise to anyone who had not seen them play before, as they suffered a 13-8 loss to Duke in the first round of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament. The Blue Devils - who handed the Irish an 11-9 defeat in last season's NCAA title game - raced out to a 10-1 third-quarter lead from which the Irish would never recover.
NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Beinlich's skin is pale. At 57, he walks about as fast as someone two decades older. He is OK with that, given the alternative. "I'd rather be living than kicking up daisies," said Beinlich, of Philadelphia's Olney neighborhood. Beinlich is being kept alive by an artificial heart. Temple University Hospital surgeons removed his own, badly diseased organ in August and replaced it with the 5.6-ounce plastic device. More than 1,000 other patients have gotten the implants since the Food and Drug Administration approved them in 2004.
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