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Horn Hardart

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BUSINESS
December 2, 1988 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Horn & Hardart plans to open a restaurant in Jenkintown by February, bringing to three the number of locations for the reconstituted company, a venerable purveyor of modestly priced, rib-sticking food. The 100-year-old company once served 800,000 customers a day in 80 restaurants in Philadelphia and New York. It opened the nation's first Automat in 1902 at 818 Chestnut St. By 1986, after two bankruptcies, the company was down to one restaurant, in Bala Cynwyd. But recently, Horn & Hardart has been on the move.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | By Ward Allebach, Special to The Inquirer
Horn & Hardart's restaurant chain had fallen into decline two decades before its branch at Jenkintown Square opened in February 1989, an almost- desperate effort to revive the century-old name. But the effort failed, and that Jenkintown H & H, the last Horn & Hardart restaurant, closed for good on Saturday. "Ever since fast-food restaurants came into existence, (Horn & Hardart's) have been dropping like flies," said David Strocen, the Jenkintown manager since November. "By the time I got here, it was already too late.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
One side benefit of the construction of the massive retail-and-residential East Market project is that it has opened up views (temporarily, anyway) of the tightly packed commercial blocks between 11th and 12th Streets. For the first time in decades, you can clearly make out the colorful terra-cotta details on 15 S. 11th St., once a flagship location for the Horn & Hardart restaurant chain. The ornate, five-story structure was designed and built in 1912 by William Steele & Sons, the go-to developer of the day, on commission for Horn & Hardart.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1994 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Creamed spinach, thick enough to stand a spoon in. Macaroni and cheese, crusty on top, rich and cheesy in the middle. Tapioca pudding, bursting with pearls the size of marbles . . . Memories of Horn & Hardart, which fed Philadelphians and New Yorkers for a century before sinking into bankruptcy. . . . Harvard beets, oozing with red juice. Rice pudding, studded with fat raisins. Chicken a la king, with peas in thick gravy . . . Fueled by nostalgia and keen taste buds, two entrepreneurs are reviving the company that for decades boasted that it fed one in eight Philadelphians on any given day. Aaron J. Katz and Albert A. Mazzone, after a year of painstaking research and tasting, re-created 12 of the classic H&H foods, which are now sold in a rapidly growing number of grocery stores and supermarkets.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Creamed spinach, stewed tomatoes and Salisbury steaks are back - and coming to Jenkintown. By February, Horn & Hardart is expected to be open for business in Jenkintown Square, in the spot where Gibson's restaurant operated until August - further evidence of the rejuvenation of the 100-year-old institution that once served 800,000 customers a day in 80 locations around Philadelphia and New York. Horn & Hardart, which two years ago was in bankruptcy and down to its last restaurant, in Bala Cynwyd, opened a second restaurant in the summer of 1987 on Street Road in Bensalem.
NEWS
March 6, 2003 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
June Reynolds Mishultz, 82, a retired head waitress and hostess at former Horn & Hardart's and Williamson's restaurants who operated Pete's Variety Store in Fairmount, died Tuesday of sleep apnea at Abington Memorial Hospital. After growing up in the Baptist Orphanage at 58th and Thomas Streets, Mrs. Mishultz worked in a laundry in West Philadelphia as a teenager. There she honed her ironing skills, which she later put to use to starch her waitress uniforms "until they stood up on their own," said her daughter Jeannie Fogarty.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1986 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
A National Paragon Corp. subsidiary that owns the Home Shopping Cable TV Program yesterday filed for reorganization under federal bankruptcy laws. Paragon, based in Philadelphia, said that Media Arts International Ltd., which owns and produces the shop-at-home program appearing on such cable television services as Black Entertainment Network, Lifetime, Nashville Network and USA Network, had filed for protection under Chapter 11 of the federal bankruptcy code. Media Arts is based in Phoenix, Ariz.
NEWS
October 20, 1988 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louis Shapson would make his way from table to table in the old-fashioned Northeast automat, shaking hands, swapping stories and telling jokes to the people who lived near Cottman Avenue and Large Street. To them, Mr. Shapson was the "mayor of Horn & Hardart. " And after Mr. Shapson, 78, died yesterday at his Castor Gardens home, it was the boundless spirit he brought to people at the former Horn & Hardart branch, and to others he met along the way, that those close to him recalled.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
You are not entering the Twilight Zone. You are entering the timeless world of Horn & Hardart. Here, nothing changes. The customers are the same: "I've been eating at H&H since I was 6. That's 70 years ago," said Harry A. Caplen. "I've had my breakfast here every day for the last 18 years," added Irv Timbers. The waitresses are the same: "I started with the company 45 years ago . . . Geez, it seems like yesterday," said Mary Amblard. The cooks are the same: Making breakfast, using recipes developed almost 100 years ago, are Ike Grant, 40 years on the job; Jack Spicer, 39 years, and Eugene Savage, 43 years.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1954, Monroe Levin and Cameron McGraw were struggling musicians who survived on peanut butter, 55-cent lunches at Horn & Hardart and the money they earned for giving music lessons. Through the years, their diet has been upgraded, Horn & Hardart has gone and come again and the music lessons have evolved into a widely respected, 680-student music school in Jenkintown. Levin and McGraw founded the Jenkintown Music School 35 years ago, come September. In a recent interview, the two founders reflected on the path that has led to the school's incarnation as a Jenkintown branch of the Settlement Music School.
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NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
One side benefit of the construction of the massive retail-and-residential East Market project is that it has opened up views (temporarily, anyway) of the tightly packed commercial blocks between 11th and 12th Streets. For the first time in decades, you can clearly make out the colorful terra-cotta details on 15 S. 11th St., once a flagship location for the Horn & Hardart restaurant chain. The ornate, five-story structure was designed and built in 1912 by William Steele & Sons, the go-to developer of the day, on commission for Horn & Hardart.
SPORTS
December 2, 2012 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 76ers had won the NBA title a little more than a month earlier, so I wasn't shocked when Al Domenico, their trainer and my godfather, missed my high school graduation in June 1967. He did appear later that night, joining my parents and me at Pete Richard's bar, across the street from the Bulletin building where both he and my father - my paternal grandmother and Al's father were siblings - once worked together. Though he'd forgotten a gift, Uncle Al had one in mind. "You play baseball, Frankie?"
NEWS
March 25, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
Whenever a good cause needed a leader, Mabel Townes was never the last to volunteer. When Hurricane Katrina wrecked New Orleans in 2005, Mabel spearheaded a church and community fundraiser that sent thousands of dollars for relief efforts to the beleaguered city. The next year found her raising funds for St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital, in Memphis. Her involvement in worthy causes included being a health worker and day-care provider, helping the needy in North Philadelphia and serving on development projects in her community.
NEWS
December 14, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
HOW DO you live to be 106? Well, follow the lead of Viola Waters. She shunned greasy foods, concentrated on fresh vegetables and had a daily drink of hot tea, which she believed removed impurities from the body. She certainly must have done something right, because not only did she live nearly seven years beyond the century mark, she was healthy and alert almost to the end. "Last June, she visited me in Strawberry Mansion and didn't want any help walking," said her granddaughter Donna M. Stoney.
NEWS
December 7, 2010 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When Patti Smith won the National Book Award last month for Just Kids , her tenderly evocative memoir of her friendship and love affair with photographer Robert Mapplethorpe in late-'60s-early-'70s New York, the poet-rocker made an impassioned plea to the big shots of the publishing world. Recalling the years she spent working as a clerk at Scribner's bookstore in Manhattan, Smith said: "I dreamed of having a book of my own, or writing one that I could put on a shelf. Please, no matter how we advance technologically, please don't abandon the book.
NEWS
August 23, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
JOSEPH A. DYCH liked everything about being a judge. "He liked the whole idea of the courtroom," said his wife, the former Sandra Tranchitella. "The pomp and circumstance, the robes, the rituals. " And, of course, he liked the idea of being able to help people by dispensing justice with an even hand. "He was always interested in both sides of any situation," his wife said. "He was a very fair person. Political science always interested him, about people who could affect changes, how people were treated.
NEWS
August 22, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph A. Dych, 68, of Spring Garden, a judge in the Court of Common Pleas in Philadelphia and a community activist, died of lung cancer Thursday, Aug. 19, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Judge Dych was appointed to the Court of Common Pleas in 2002 and was elected to a 10-year term in 2003. Becoming a judge fulfilled a "lifelong dream," said his wife, Sandra Tranchitella Dych. Judge Dych handled major felony cases and civil motions and had been sitting in the Major Civil Jury program.
NEWS
October 18, 2006 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Stephen Joseph LaRosa, 73, of Villanova, former headmaster at St. Augustine College Preparatory School in Richland, N.J., and an official with the Camden Diocese, died of cancer Oct. 12 at St. Thomas Monastery in Villanova. Father LaRosa led St. Augustine College Preparatory School during a period of significant growth. During his initial tenure, enrollment more than doubled to 230 students. A sports complex, chapel and courses in business and the sciences were added. He joined the faculty of the school for the first time following his ordination in 1965.
NEWS
January 25, 2004 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anna K. McMahon, 85, of Middletown, a founder of the local chapter of the Father Peyton Rosary Crusade, died Thursday at Sunrise, an assisted-living facility in Middletown. Mrs. McMahon was born in County Mayo, Ireland. She immigrated to the United States at age 18 with her two sisters. "Their mother had said: 'Go to America. It's more of a land of opportunity,' " her daughter Suzanne Sears said. The trio settled in the Germantown area, ultimately buying houses on the same block.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2003 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One might tell the Borishes that they're going about their business the wrong way. That they spend too much on their ingredients and rent. That they should expand well beyond Philadelphia. Then again, one might keep one's mouth shut. As it nears its 20th anniversary, Marathon Grill happens to be sprinting merrily in today's soft economy - even planning a seventh outlet - while many other restaurants, primarily posher establishments, are stumbling. Marathon most definitely is not posh.
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