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NEWS
September 10, 2002
IN RESPONSE to Fatima Lewis' letter on Section 8 housing (Sept. 5): My parents own three rental properties, one of which is approved for Section 8. There are certain specifications for Section 8 approval and in order to get that, money has to be invested - my father's money. Then the Section 8'ers move in. My father has always been good to his tenants, who in turn have ripped doors and hinges out of the walls, removed every doorknob (who needs a doorknob when you don't see the need to have doors)
NEWS
October 30, 2011
For Halloween weekend, match the horror-fiction author with his or her work. Answers: Below. 1. L.A. Banks. 2. Stephen King. 3. Ira Levin. 4. Susie Moloney. 5. Edgar Allan Poe. 6. Horacio Quiroga. 7. Anne Rice. 8. Mary Shelley. 9. Bram Stoker. 10. Koji Suzuki a. The Dark Tower, The Gunslinger . b. Dracula . c. A Dry Spell . d. Frankenstein . e. Interview With the Vampire . f. Ring . g. Rosemary's Baby . h. Stories of Love, Madness, and Death . i. Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque . j. The Vampire Huntress Legend series.
NEWS
September 13, 2011
RE JENICE Armstrong's column on "The Help": Yes, many of our mothers, aunts, grandmothers and their friends were domestics and many of their experiences were indeed horror stories. Those fortunate to still be among us declined to see the movie for the same reason your mother did - "Why would I want to relive that?" Was this movie really necessary? Is there some untold story that we haven't already heard? If there's a moral to be depicted, I certainly missed it. I saw the movie with five sister friends, and none of us were impressed.
NEWS
September 3, 1986 | By Bruce Cook, Los Angeles Daily News
Journalists always remark with surprise at how normal writers of horror fiction seem to them. Just as Stephen King catches them off guard with his boyish, guileless enthusiasm, Peter Straub impresses with his intellectual self-possession. What this usually means is that they're not wild-eyed and don't gibber, as their interviewers seem to expect. So let's get that out of the way right now: Clive Barker seems normal - is about as normal as any writer can claim to be. A youngish 34, smiling and happy, he has a quality of diffident eagerness that so many of the nicer English seem to display.
NEWS
July 23, 2006 | By Mark J. Schumaker
I read the recent news on the destruction of human embryos for embryonic stem cell research, harvesting of fetuses, and cloning of human beings with a great sense of alarm. That these issues are now being debated by our state and federal lawmakers - when before they were the subject of only horror movies - is even more shocking. I am not strong enough to enter this brave new world of cannibalized human embryos, harvested body parts, and eugenically engineered human beings that is being forced on me. And I don't believe that we, as a moral people and a civilized society, are brave enough to go where no man has gone before, except in the other worlds of science fiction.
NEWS
October 19, 2010
TWO WEEKS before Halloween, the People's Choice Movement Coalition went trick-or-treating at the Berean Institute, 19th and Girard. It was Saturday, it was a town meeting, and the Grand Goblin was the Philadelphia Parking Authority, the most ruthlessly efficient (albeit sometimes errant) arm of government. Organized by People's Choice - a grass-roots community-organizing group - the town meeting was a Gripe-O-Rama for anyone feeling abused by the PPA, which was described by WURD (900-AM)
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | BY DAVE BARRY
Recently I've been reading horror novels at bedtime. I'm talking about those paperbacks with names like "The Brainsucker," full of scenes like this: "As Marge stepped through the doorway into the darkening mansion, she felt a sense of foreboding, caused, perhaps, by the moaning of the wind, or the creaking of the door, or possibly the Kentucky Fried Chicken bucket full of eyeballs. " Of course if Marge had the intelligence of paint, she'd stop right there. "Wait a minute," she'd say. "I'm getting the hell out of this novel.
REAL_ESTATE
April 30, 2000 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Kurt Magda realized he had found the house of his dreams, he started to worry. He had heard horror stories from friends and relatives about the unseen problems a house could hold, as though the walls and beams, the roof and ceilings would somehow conspire to conceal any number of costly sins. "It's pretty unnerving," said Magda, 28, who is spending more than $130,000 on a 75-year-old, seven-room, brick house with aluminum siding in Conshohocken. "I'm worried about structural soundness, the flooring, termites.
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a business where careers are built one corpse at a time, Barry Bowe says the harshest truth of writing in the genre known as "true crime" is this: Some murders are "commercial stories," but most others are not. A guy kills his wife and then turns the weapon on himself? Sorry. Too common. Not commercial. Drug dealers are gunned down in a shootout? Yawn. Good riddance. Definitely not commercial. Sex, strangulation and dismemberment? Stop! Yes. Very commercial. Throw in, say, seven more bodies, an outlaw, drug-trafficking motorcycle gang and a prison escape by the arch villain, and, mon Dieu, it's a book, maybe even a movie, and maybe even a sequel.
NEWS
December 16, 2001 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Bill and Linda Low have owned four old houses together over the last 25 years, so you'd think they'd have four times the horror stories. Not really. If they didn't like owning and restoring old houses, they would have stopped after the first one, a small house in the center of Doylestown, built in 1850, that they traded for a circa 1870 house on five acres in Plumstead Township, which they then sold to buy a 1797 house in Solebury, which they exchanged, in August 1998, for a 1720 house in New Hope.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 11, 2016
Masterpiece. Churchill's Secret and Indian Summers . In a double dose of PBS drama, Michael Gambon portrays British prime minister Winston Churchill in 1953, when he was secretly sidelined by a near-fatal stroke, in a two-hour film followed by the second-season premiere of the series set in a British retreat in 1930s India. 8 and 10 p.m. Sunday, WHYY12. Son of Zorn. Jason Sudeikis ( Saturday Night Live ) voices Zorn, a clueless action hero trying to reconnect with his son (Johnny Pemberton)
NEWS
August 10, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON — A mother still paying off student loans for her murdered son. Another whose son declared bankruptcy after he was unable to keep up with payments. A young woman who worried she would never be able to have a child because of her six-figure debt. These were stories New Jersey lawmakers heard Monday as they took testimony on the state's Higher Education Student Assistance Authority (HESAA), which recently drew scrutiny in a ProPublica investigation. The investigation, published last month in collaboration with the New York Times , described the state's loan program as an anomaly among government lending programs for students, "with extraordinarily stringent rules that can easily lead to financial ruin.
NEWS
December 25, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Staff Writer
Midway through Concussion , the film's already grim focus gets a fiery exclamation point. As a wild-eyed Justin Strzelczyk, beset by demons in his head, speeds away from his Pennsylvania home carrying $2,700 and a fistful of crucifixes, the movie cuts to grainy footage of the ex-Steeler lineman's black SUV. Accompanied by the frantic buzz of police chatter, we see the eastbound car racing recklessly through the westbound lanes of the New...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two years ago, some Irish citizens went ballistic over a proposal by their government to reduce the national debt by selling off some of the island nation's national forests to corporations. The plan was abandoned, but not before inspiring writer-director Corin Hardy to come up with the premise for his feature debut, The Hallow , a wonderfully entertaining horror yarn about a forest that rises up to defend itself from human encroachment. An eco-thriller heavily inspired by ancient Irish fables and pre-Christian religious imagery, The Hallow belongs to a tradition of offbeat horror out of Britain and Ireland that includes the 1973 classic The Wicker Man , from Robin Hardy (no relation to Corin)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
This week brings the premiere of two radically different, but equally stimulating shows. FX's disturbing, inventive American Horror Story returns for a new installment Wednesday. Also on Wednesday, Hulu will present its new rom-com, Casual , a surprisingly intelligent show about dating for thirtysomethings. Lady Gaga's fangs American Horror Story: Hotel seems to have all the ingredients of a memorable horror classic. Driven by a great goth sound track of funereal dirges by Joy Division and Bauhaus, the fifth incarnation of the anthology series features an unforgettable performance by Lady Gaga - at turns stunning and creepy, beautiful and grotesque - as a vampire countess who rules over an assortment of monstrous atrocities at a gorgeous art deco hotel in Los Angeles called the Hotel Cortez.
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
A REAL MONSTER was hiding behind a door Tuesday morning, in the darkened hallway of a North Philly rowhouse. Police don't know who he is or why he was in the home next to an old, rundown church on Hutchinson Street, and unlike the tropes of a rated PG-13 horror movie, this stranger didn't just scare the little 5-year-old girl who walked past him in the dark and slip out like a ghost. The man took the little girl by the hand, out into a tiny, weed-choked backyard, where police said he beat her with his fists and boots until her little face was broken.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* THE TOMORROW PEOPLE. 9 tonight, CW57. * AMERICAN HORROR STORY: COVEN. 10 TONIGHT, FX. * ONCE UPON A TIME IN WONDERLAND. 8 p.m. tomorrow, 6ABC.   THE ADOLESCENT struggle between fitting in and standing out tends to interest television most when the struggling adolescents are superrich or just plain super. Producers Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk colored outside those lines in Fox's "Glee," but as their bloodier anthology series, "American Horror Story," returns to FX tonight for its witchy third season, "Coven," it's all about teens with powers (and their even more powerful elders)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
It's gut check time. As American Horror Story prepares to disgorge its second heaving helping of nightmare imagery onto the national drive-in screen, you need to ask yourself just how much darkness you're willing to abide. Because Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk, the creators of this white-knuckle ride, aren't backing down. American Horror Story: Asylum may run at 10 p.m. on Wednesdays, but it should really be on at 3 a.m., when only shell-shocked insomniacs could see it. The first season centered on a fragmenting family living in a Los Angeles house with a string of tragic incidents and an active cadre of malevolent ghosts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2012 | By Ellen Gray and Daily News Staff Writer
AMC's "Mad Men" and FX's "American Horror Story" tied Thursday for the most Emmy nominations, with 17 apiece. But the two basic cable shows won't be facing each other in the competition for outstanding drama. Because while you might have thought both were regular series, the FX show, taking advantage, perhaps, of its anthology format, is competing in the movies and miniseries category, up against HBO's "Game Change," the History Channel's "Hatfields & McCoys," HBO's "Hemingway & Gellhorn," BBC America's "Luther" and PBS' "Masterpiece" presentation "Sherlock: A Scandal in Belgravia.
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