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NEWS
January 19, 1986
Now see what you have done! You've got me agreeing with an oil man. Theodore A. Burtis, chairman of the board of Sun Co., was right when he said (Letter to the Editor, Jan. 12) that The Inquirer was wrong to suggest a new levy on oil to get the country out of the red. We must cut out luxury items to balance the budget. I can see no greater luxury than spending a trillion dollars on military gadgets when we already have enough to destroy the world too many times. Hezekiah Nickelson Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 13, 2004
your doctor, dentist, pharmacist, phone company, cable company, you have to push six different numbers. First, you have to choose English, or Espanol. This is nonsensical. Then you have a long staccato burst of Spanish. Why does the second language have to be Spanish? Why not Italian, German, Polish, or Yiddish? You call Social Security, or the Senior Citizens Advocate Center for days on end, nobody answers. If they have so many callers, why don't they hire more reps? They usually tell you to call tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Nikita Mikhalkov's Burnt by the Sun (1994) was made four decades after the death of Joseph Stalin and five years after the end of the Cold War. The first Russian appraisal of the real dimensions of Stalin's tyranny may have been a long time coming, but it was well worth the wait. Mikhalkov's profoundly moving work, which won the Oscar for best foreign film, is a piece that shuns both polemic and melodrama. The director took the lead as Sergei Kotov, a hero of the Bolshevik revolution who is to learn the painful lesson that past victories will not prevent him from becoming a victim of the new order.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
"Come and See"(Idi I Smortri), a Russian war drama starring Alexei Kravchenko, Olga Mironova and Lubomiras Lauciavicus. Directed by Elem Klimov from a screenplay by Klimov and Ales Adamovich. Based on "The Story of Khatyn" by Adamovich Photographed by Alexei Rodionov. A Heritage Entertainment Film released through International Film Exchange Ltd. In Russian with English subtitles. Running time: 142 minutes. At the TLA Roxy. Very few war movies from any country - including our own - pummel our insides like "Come and See," the award-winning Soviet World War II epic by Elem Klimov, in which the grand, sprawling style of the classic battle epics is used to take in the full measure of wartime atrocities.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Feed me! That's what the bloodthirsty, other-worldly plant named Audrey II implores, then demands, in Little Shop of Horrors. Well, she got what she asked for. Two of the region's smaller professional stage companies - Theatre Horizon and 11th Hour Theatre Company - have banded together to produce the musical, and they've not only heartily fed the maniacal plant, they've re-seeded and carefully tended the show itself. Their gleefully sassy production puts a fine point on every caricature it draws and treats each song by Howard Ashman and Alan Menken like a show-stopper.
NEWS
January 18, 1988 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
For years, everyone in town has recognized the crying need for a middle- size theater suitable for the commercial booking of Off-Broadway hits. We have needed a house with enough seats for an impresario to turn a profit with an attractive show, but not so big as to be a burden. The return of the 400-seat Theater of Living Arts to the legitimate fold was exactly what we needed, especially with the installation of that good-time show, The Little Shop of Horrors. The conversion of TLA from film repertory to live theater by Electric Factory Concerts will go down as one of the major developments of the 1987-88 season - provided, of course, that it lasts out the season.
NEWS
June 18, 2008
Rosalind Lavin's four-acre Villanova estate was notorious on the Main Line even before Lavin lived there. It was the site of a triple murder. In July 1982, aviation pioneer Courtlandt Gross was shot to death during a robbery at the Arrowmink Road mansion, along with his wife, housekeeper and family dog. The Boston-born and Harvard-educated Gross, 77, was co-founder and chairman of Lockheed Corp. His wife, Alexandra, 68, was a great-granddaughter of banker Anthony J. Drexel, for whom Drexel University is named.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1998 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the darkness and despair in the Jewish ghetto of Kovno, Lithuania, may have issued sparks of illumination: small but enduring spiritual victories amid defeat. Or perhaps this view, as literary critic Lawrence L. Langer suggests, is a romanticization - reflecting our need to transfigure a reality so ghastly it is unbearable to see. Still, the secret archivists of Kovno, who at great personal risk recorded the Nazi destruction of their community, must have felt some shred of hope.
NEWS
May 14, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THE LATEST legal battle in the Tacony "House of Horrors" case was derailed yesterday, when a U.S. District Court judge threw out a civil suit filed by a victim's mother. U.S. District Judge R. Barclay Surrick dismissed a case filed by Victoria Weston against the city's Department of Human Services and other local government offices, on the grounds that she had waited too long to file it, letting the statute of limitations lapse. She should have sued in 2002, when her daughter, Beatrice, entered into the care of her sister Linda Ann Weston, the judge wrote in his opinion.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
There are entire horror movies that aren't as unnerving as the opening credits to John Carpenter's Halloween . What's so eerie, and sets the tone for a film that has become a revered horror classic and spawned too many better-left-unmentioned sequels, isn't the slow zoom into the firelit face of a menacingly grinning jack-o'-lantern. It's the insistent, jittery score, a simple piano melody repeating over a menacing drone. Like the film itself, that memorable music is the work of John Carpenter, who composed the scores for many of his own films.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Classes were not yet underway at Camden High School when the two teenagers slipped out of the building unnoticed. Half a mile from school they came across an unlocked silver Cadillac DeVille, police said, and they began cruising through the city's streets. They were driving north on the cobblestone-paved Seventh Street in the city's Lanning Square section just before 10 a.m. on April 25 when they passed a police cruiser. By then the owner of the Cadillac had reported it stolen, and the officer made a U-turn behind them.
NEWS
May 28, 2016
By SaraKay Smullens Perhaps you recall the coverage through the years of children who died while under the care of the city's Department of Human Services (DHS). There was 5-year-old Charnae Wise, who died in her mother's basement. And 14-year-old Danieal Kelly, who was starved and weighed 46 pounds when she died, her body riddled by running sores and scabs. Tara M. did not die, but the 9-year-old was tortured and sexually assaulted by her foster parents. These stories go back decades, and each new horror results in reports that document the horrors and call for reforms at DHS. With such stories in mind, I was disheartened and angry - but not surprised - to read last week that the state had downgraded DHS's license.
NEWS
May 11, 2016
ISSUE | AMERICAN INDIANS Send remains home Kudos to Inquirer reporter Jeff Gammage for writing about the horrors inflicted on the American Indian children of Carlisle, Pa. ("Honoring ancestors," May 1). I hope the U.S. Army's consultations with Indian tribes will be completed successfully within a reasonable time so that the children's remains can be returned to their families. The wait has been too long. |Bernice Kaplan, Philadelphia
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2016 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
There's an early scene in Jeremy Saulnier's arresting new thriller Green Room that's so punk rock it hurts. The Ain't Rights, a young, noisy band touring the Pacific Northwest, are sitting for an interview with a mohawked music journalist. He leads by asking why the group is so hard to track down online. "The music is shared live," Pat (Anton Yelchin), the bass player, replies with a slight holier-than-thou edge. "It's time and aggression, and then it's over. You got to be there.
NEWS
April 30, 2016
By Hannah Dougherty Campbell I was standing in a gas chamber. Above me in this deep, dank cellar were rusty nozzles that once spewed Zyklon B. This was part of the tour our hotel clerk told us about - a visit to the Dachau concentration camp memorial to lay flowers for those who suffered and died during Adolf Hitler's Holocaust. We were a group of Americans who had come to Germany for the 1977 Oktoberfest. The bus ride from Munich to Dachau was a short 10 miles, but the distance from gaily decorated beer tents to the ghostly gray grounds of desolation and despair was incalculable.
NEWS
March 30, 2016
By Peter Binzen This is a war story - actually an after-the-war story. I was a staff sergeant in the U.S. Army's 10th Mountain Division, the so-called "ski troops" of World War II. It's true that we trained on skis in Colorado before shipping overseas. But once we entered combat against the Germans in Italy's Apennines, skis were forgotten. We were ordinary foot soldiers. The 10th entered the fray in January 1945. The Apennines were white with snow and the fighting was static.
NEWS
March 24, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
An eighth-floor Philadelphia courtroom turned into a time machine Tuesday, reaching back to the early hours of Aug. 24, 1985, when, prosecutors say, Daniel Dougherty killed his two young sons by setting fire to the family home. Old black-and-white photos of the burned Oxford Circle rowhouse were shown on a screen. The boys' babysitter that night - then 9, now a grown woman - testified how she put the children to bed. A now-retired police officer told the jury how he arrived at a horror scene, knowing that children were inside the house and seeing flames "coming out like a blast furnace.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
Timothy Scruggs couldn't be late for this. He ran down a dirt path worn through an empty lot, dodged plastic bags and discarded bottles and snack wrappers and came to a halt in the parking lot at 22nd and Sharswood Streets. It was just past 7 a.m. on Saturday. There was still time. The place was packed - mothers with children wrapped in blankets, young women in nursing scrubs just getting off the night shift, a man selling T-shirts out of the trunk of his car. The shirts read: "Forever Blumberg.
NEWS
February 9, 2016 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
LAMAR ANDERSON wasn't sure what the sound was. Suburban Station is usually a blur of movement and noise, but that thump was different from any other background noise he'd grown accustomed to. When he turned to see what it was, he almost couldn't believe it. It was the sound of metal being slammed into a man's skull. Steps away, at the ticket counter, a man was beating another over the head with what police would later discover was a pipe wrench. Anderson, 37, homeless for 11 years, is one of the many men and women who find their way to the station at dawn after a night on the streets or in one of the city's shelters.
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