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Horse Meat

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NEWS
March 9, 2013
By Erica Meier Headlines around the world have blared the scandal: Unwitting Britons who dined on hamburgers, meatballs, or other beef products were actually eating horse meat - and they're outraged. In fact, recent polls show that 20 percent of U.K. consumers are now eating less meat and 7 percent are saying "neigh" to meat altogether. In Philadelphia, the news seems to have had the opposite effect: At least one restaurant says it plans to add horse meat to its menu. The scandal raises many uncomfortable questions.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Horse No. 109 walked into the auction ring highly recommended. Only a year and a half old, his owner had said, and calm enough for the grandchildren to ride. The sales pitch didn't spark much bidding, though, and seconds later the horse had sold for $135. "The grandchildren won't ride him no more," muttered a man in the bleachers who knew the animal faced a far less pleasant fate. When the recent sale at New Holland Sales Auction was over, the horse went to Amfran Packing Co. in Plainfield, Conn.
NEWS
March 13, 2013
TO STU Bykofsky: Just a note to let you know that your column on horse meat was on point. I am a member of PETA and for years we have tried to outlaw horse slaughter. If these so-called gourmets would just read the material on horse slaughter in Mexico they just might change their jackass minds. Horse meat was never intended for human consumption. If these politicians succeed in getting horse-slaughter plants up and running, we will be doing a great injustice to our beloved horses.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Its livestock markets decimated by mad cow and foot-and-mouth diseases, Europe is turning to North America for a substitute for beef and lamb, fueling a sudden demand for a little-known U.S. export: horse meat. That demand has propelled prices at Pennsylvania's largest livestock auction house from $500 to as much as $800 per horse in recent weeks, daunting bidders who try to buy horses to rescue them. While eating horse meat may be anathema to people in this country, the meat is regularly served in French and Belgian bistros as cheval, a low-fat, high-protein alternative to beef.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
FOR DECADES, Philadelphians have chomped on cheesesteaks and noshed on soft pretzels. But could city residents actually develop a palette for horse meat? Chef Peter McAndrews thinks so. He recently announced plans to serve the equine delicacy at his Sicilian restaurant Monsu in Bella Vista, even as European food outlets deal with fallout from the discovery of horse DNA in beef products. "I like the idea of being an authentic Italian restaurant. When I heard the ban was lifted, I was very pleased," McAndrews said, referring to the ban on horse slaughter in the United States, which was lifted in 2011, when Congress reinstated federal funding for U.S. Department of Agriculture inspection of horse meat.
NEWS
February 13, 2013
Bullfighting gains in Spain MADRID - Spain took a key first step Tuesday toward enshrining bullfighting as a key part of the nation's cultural heritage, a move that could roll back a ban on the blood-soaked pageants in the northeastern region of Catalonia. Lawmakers in parliament accepted a petition from bullfight supporters asking for the special status in a 180-40 vote that included 107 abstentions. A parliamentary cultural commission will now begin work on proposed legislation over the coming months with expectations that it will go to a vote this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1994 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press, Reuters and the New York Daily News
Despite death threats, Brigitte Bardot repeated demands yesterday that the French government ban horse meat. Her call for a boycott of the product Wednesday on a Paris TV talk show generated a rush of national protest from butchers and horse farmers. Both Bardot and the show's host, Pierre Foucault, who also received threats and has been sued for libel by horse butchers, were placed under police protection. Yesterday, the movies' former sex kitten turned animal rights activist, pleaded with agriculture minister Jean Puech to ban the sale of horse meat, claiming it was dangerous to eat and led to immoral slaughter.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
WHENEVER you think the vacuous herd called "foodies" has exceeded its capacity for self-indulgence, it adds another chapter to the book. From chasing every "new" ethnic recipe (this week, sautéed Croatian goat testicles), to traipsing into edgy neighborhoods for "street foods" (Kensington beer and bath-salts consommé) to exotic culinary combinations (French/Kazakhstani, Thai/Antarctic, Dutch/Treat), they seem to be (as Oscar Wilde described foxhunting) the unspeakable chasing the uneatable.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Karl Ritter, Associated Press
STOCKHOLM - Swedish furniture giant Ikea became entangled in Europe's widening meat scandal Monday, forced to withdraw meatballs from stores across Europe amid suspicions that they contained horse meat. Stores in the United States and Canada were not affected, Ikea said. The company reacted after authorities in the Czech Republic said they had detected horse DNA in tests of 1-kilogram (2.2-pound) packs of frozen meatballs that were labeled as beef and pork. The Czech State Veterinary Administration said that it tested two batches of Ikea meatballs and that only one of them contained horse meat.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Michelle Faul, Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Worried about horse meat in your beef? Try water buffalo, donkey, and goat. South African food scientists said they have found all three in mislabeled foods including beef burgers, ground beef and sausages. A study published by three professors at Stellenbosch University found that 68 percent of 139 samples contained species not declared in the product label, with the highest incidence in sausages, burger patties and deli meats. The study found soy and gluten were not labeled in 28 percent of products tested.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 19, 2013
Region discounting arts' value Philadelphians are counting on culture to fuel our economy, educate children, generate tax revenue, and build our quality of life. Yet, we have slashed the Cultural Fund budget in half from $3.2 million in 2010 to $1.6 million today. That means we invest just $1 per year per citizen. So the fund is making nearly impossible decisions on funding ("Cultural Fund awards 244 grants: Friction emerges over handling of W. Phila. group," March 7). It's basic math: With less to go around every year, many vital community cultural programs no longer make the cut. Over the last 20 years, City Council has been smart to invest in arts and culture, since the region's cultural sector provides 44,000 jobs, and returns $3.3 billion in yearly economic impact and $169 million in taxes.
NEWS
March 13, 2013
TO STU Bykofsky: Just a note to let you know that your column on horse meat was on point. I am a member of PETA and for years we have tried to outlaw horse slaughter. If these so-called gourmets would just read the material on horse slaughter in Mexico they just might change their jackass minds. Horse meat was never intended for human consumption. If these politicians succeed in getting horse-slaughter plants up and running, we will be doing a great injustice to our beloved horses.
NEWS
March 9, 2013
By Erica Meier Headlines around the world have blared the scandal: Unwitting Britons who dined on hamburgers, meatballs, or other beef products were actually eating horse meat - and they're outraged. In fact, recent polls show that 20 percent of U.K. consumers are now eating less meat and 7 percent are saying "neigh" to meat altogether. In Philadelphia, the news seems to have had the opposite effect: At least one restaurant says it plans to add horse meat to its menu. The scandal raises many uncomfortable questions.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
WHENEVER you think the vacuous herd called "foodies" has exceeded its capacity for self-indulgence, it adds another chapter to the book. From chasing every "new" ethnic recipe (this week, sautéed Croatian goat testicles), to traipsing into edgy neighborhoods for "street foods" (Kensington beer and bath-salts consommé) to exotic culinary combinations (French/Kazakhstani, Thai/Antarctic, Dutch/Treat), they seem to be (as Oscar Wilde described foxhunting) the unspeakable chasing the uneatable.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
FOR DECADES, Philadelphians have chomped on cheesesteaks and noshed on soft pretzels. But could city residents actually develop a palette for horse meat? Chef Peter McAndrews thinks so. He recently announced plans to serve the equine delicacy at his Sicilian restaurant Monsu in Bella Vista, even as European food outlets deal with fallout from the discovery of horse DNA in beef products. "I like the idea of being an authentic Italian restaurant. When I heard the ban was lifted, I was very pleased," McAndrews said, referring to the ban on horse slaughter in the United States, which was lifted in 2011, when Congress reinstated federal funding for U.S. Department of Agriculture inspection of horse meat.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Michelle Faul, Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Worried about horse meat in your beef? Try water buffalo, donkey, and goat. South African food scientists said they have found all three in mislabeled foods including beef burgers, ground beef and sausages. A study published by three professors at Stellenbosch University found that 68 percent of 139 samples contained species not declared in the product label, with the highest incidence in sausages, burger patties and deli meats. The study found soy and gluten were not labeled in 28 percent of products tested.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Karl Ritter, Associated Press
STOCKHOLM - Swedish furniture giant Ikea became entangled in Europe's widening meat scandal Monday, forced to withdraw meatballs from stores across Europe amid suspicions that they contained horse meat. Stores in the United States and Canada were not affected, Ikea said. The company reacted after authorities in the Czech Republic said they had detected horse DNA in tests of 1-kilogram (2.2-pound) packs of frozen meatballs that were labeled as beef and pork. The Czech State Veterinary Administration said that it tested two batches of Ikea meatballs and that only one of them contained horse meat.
NEWS
February 13, 2013
Bullfighting gains in Spain MADRID - Spain took a key first step Tuesday toward enshrining bullfighting as a key part of the nation's cultural heritage, a move that could roll back a ban on the blood-soaked pageants in the northeastern region of Catalonia. Lawmakers in parliament accepted a petition from bullfight supporters asking for the special status in a 180-40 vote that included 107 abstentions. A parliamentary cultural commission will now begin work on proposed legislation over the coming months with expectations that it will go to a vote this year.
NEWS
September 23, 2012
PHILADELPHIA Another main breaks The city's trouble with water-main breaks continued Friday with the rupture of a 12-inch pipe under Roosevelt Boulevard at Woodward Street in Bustleton. Laura Copeland, a spokeswoman for the Water Department, said the main broke at 1:30 a.m. It took about 90 minutes to turn off the water. In that time an estimated 700,000 gallons of water was released, undermining the street, Copeland said. Service to 16 customers had to be turned off to make repairs.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Kelsey Lefever was well-known in the Pennsylvania horse world. The 24-year-old horse trainer from Chester County competed at the Devon Horse Show and traded show ponies and draft horses on the Internet. At Penn National, near Harrisburg, one of the biggest racetracks in the state, she schmoozed thoroughbred owners, telling them she would find great homes for their horses when their racing careers were over. In fact, state police allege, Lefever was selling the horses - as many as 120, by her admission - to contractors for a Canadian slaughterhouse, where they were butchered and shipped overseas for human consumption.
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