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Horseshoe

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NEWS
August 16, 1987 | By David Raudenbush, Special to The Inquirer
Horseshoes will be flying in the Williamstown section of Monroe Township today. Thirty-six players from Camden and Gloucester Counties will square off at 1 p.m. at Barney's Place on the Black Horse Pike in the Second Annual Garden State Horseshoe League All-star Game. The competition pits three players from each of the league's 12 teams, which are split into two six-team divisions. The American division, which will wear red caps, consists of Early Metal, which plays at Barney's Place; the Bandits from Buondonno Cottage Inn in Williamstown; the Nuggets from the Golden Nugget Tavern in Berlin; the Ghostriders from the Grey Horse Saloon in Cedar Brook section of Winslow Township; the Outlaws from the Woodbrier Inn in Berlin, and the Pits from Fisher's Bar in Atco.
NEWS
February 20, 2013
NEW JERSEY state Sen. Jeff Van Drew wants a 5-year-old ban on harvesting horseshoe crabs lifted. Here are the main arguments over the ban:   Pro-ban * The Atlantic red knot, a shorebird recently added to the endangered-species list, depends on horseshoe-crab eggs as a vital food source, a resource that activists say would be depleted should the ban be lifted. * Tens of thousands of bird-watchers routinely flock to the Jersey Shore in early May to watch red-knot migration.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1991 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Out here in the slow lane, it's easy to fall into a rut. That's why the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation has set aside $200,000 for research. Lancaster County may spend an additional $10,000, and even some local townships may put up scarce dollars. With all that problem-solving money floating around, Lewis Strine figures he's a shoo-in. After all, he's the sole distributor in Pennsylvania for the equine equivalent of Earth Shoes. And, as far as Strine is concerned, there's no better way to eliminate the problem of what's known around here as "horseshoe-induced road damage.
NEWS
September 5, 2004 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is it, man, this is what they live for. Set up the lawn chairs under the locust trees, bang the stakes into the dirt, and let it fly, the heckling, swaggering back-and-forth that's been crowding out whatever troubles they had for, how many years is it, George? Fifteen? Twenty? Clank. "You showing off today, Will!" "Sit down, old man!" "Do not mess with me!" Thump. "Hanging on by your teeth!" "The champ is here!" And so was the moment of truth.
NEWS
May 10, 2006 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal agency that conservationists hoped would impose a two-year moratorium on the Delaware Bay horseshoe crab harvest voted instead yesterday to reduce the harvest and ban the take of female crabs. The goal is to preserve more crabs so they will lay more fat-rich eggs, critical to the survival of the red knot, a shorebird whose numbers are declining. But a two-year moratorium on crab harvesting in New Jersey is due to take effect Monday, when the final rule is published in the state register.
NEWS
February 8, 2006 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To help save the red knot, a small shorebird whose survival depends on horseshoe crab eggs, New Jersey has officially proposed halting all harvesting of horseshoe crabs for two years. If adopted, the moratorium would take effect in May, when the crabs come ashore on Delaware Bay beaches to lay their eggs. That's also when the tiny red knot is alighting, emaciated after a nonstop flight from Brazil and in need of the lipid-rich eggs. Biologists have blamed the bird's precipitous decline in the last decade on a reduction of crab eggs, caused by the crab harvest.
NEWS
April 15, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON TARVER
You have to love a game that lets you carry on talking while you pitch, that doesn't make you put down your banana to play, that uses stuff found in any old barnyard, and that gives you credit for just coming close. The J. Hookers Club still carries on in Strawberry Mansion most days with pitching, cards and talk, and a lot of the talk is of the old days, when they traveled the city looking for a game. The horseshoe circuit isn't what it once was, but the memories are, and the game is the sort of irreducibly simple thing that always charms.
SPORTS
January 27, 2012 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
While introducing the Colts' new coach, Chuck Pagano, on Thursday, Indianapolis owner Jim Irsay included a blunt message for the team's erstwhile quarterback, Peyton Manning: Shut up. Seems Manning told the Indianapolis Star on Tuesday that the mood around Colts headquarters was kind of tense. Folks were nervous, he said, about the purge of the vice chairman, general manager, and coach. "I don't think it's in the best interest to paint the horseshoe in a negative light, I really don't," Irsay said.
NEWS
October 4, 2002 | By Thomas Belton
Simple moments are the best. When my son Daniel was small, I used to put him to bed in his bottom bunk. One night I remember him walking his toes up along the slats on under the upper bunk till he was bent in half, the whole time telling me about his day. "There are pictures the teacher put on the wall at school by someone with rocks in his name. " Momentarily puzzled, I offered Norman Rockwell. "Yeah, that's it," he said with a laugh. "Funny name. " "How about Stonewall Jackson?"
NEWS
February 1, 1996 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It would seem that a horseshoe nail would have no other purpose in life than to be hammered soundly into an equine hoof, but some creative thinking by Abe Cooper has rendered another use for the little metal spikes. Cooper, 77, employs a hot braising process to fuse and bend the nails into small abstract figures. The figures - dancers, cyclists, biblical characters - are on permanent display at the Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia and for sale at the American Pie galleries in Center City Philadelphia and Manayunk.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fates of a migratory shorebird, horseshoe crabs, and the state's oyster industry have converged at the center of a debate over how each should be accommodated where they come together every spring, in New Jersey tidal flats along the Delaware Bay. Wildlife advocates hope to restore the dwindling population of red knots, small birds that federal authorities listed as a threatened species about three months ago. The bird's round-trip migration of...
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bruce B. Daniels, 83, of South Harrison, a member of the International Horseshoeing Hall of Fame and owner of the former South Jersey School of Horseshoeing in Mullica Hill, died of an aneurysm at a daughter's home in Fort Myers, Fla. on Dec. 30. In 2008, South Harrison Township, where he had lived since 1952, named him its Person of the Year. "He got a plaque at our Community Day," Municipal Clerk Nancy Kearns said. "He was a wonderful person," she said, "and did a lot of good for the community.
NEWS
September 28, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
LOWER TOWNSHIP, N.J. - They look like tiny coriander seeds. And 6,000 of them can easily fit into the bottom of a half-dozen buckets filled with seawater. But the young horseshoe crabs released into the Cape May Canal on Friday, as part of the 26th anniversary of National Estuaries Day, are the essentials of a grow-and-release program at the Rutgers Aquaculture Innovation Center here. The project, called the Horseshoe Crab Enhancement Initiative, helps boost the population of the 450-million-year-old species in the Delaware Bay - an East Coast hot spot for horseshoe crabs - and provides a baseline for further study of the ecologically critical and commercially key marine arthropods.
NEWS
June 1, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
For more than 15 years, University of Delaware researcher Nancy Targett has been on an odd quest to identify what it is about horseshoe crab scent that makes the crab such alluring bait - for eels and whelks. Alas, she never succeeded. She still doesn't know what precisely constitutes eau de crab. But this week, she and other officials announced a breakthrough that could help solve one of fishery management's knottiest problems - how to lessen the harvest of crabs to save the birds that feed on their eggs, yet still allow watermen who use them as bait to make a living.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sand trucks are running. The bulldozers are spreading. A nearly $1 million effort is under way to restore Delaware Bay beaches that are - or were, before Hurricane Sandy ravaged them - crucial turf for spawning horseshoe crabs and migrating shorebirds that depend on crab eggs for refueling. On beaches where there was once ample sand for the crabs to dig into and deposit their eggs, biologists surveying the area after the storm found rugged tufts of sod, which had underlain the sand - part of $50 million in damage to bird habitats affected by Sandy.
NEWS
February 20, 2013
NEW JERSEY state Sen. Jeff Van Drew wants a 5-year-old ban on harvesting horseshoe crabs lifted. Here are the main arguments over the ban:   Pro-ban * The Atlantic red knot, a shorebird recently added to the endangered-species list, depends on horseshoe-crab eggs as a vital food source, a resource that activists say would be depleted should the ban be lifted. * Tens of thousands of bird-watchers routinely flock to the Jersey Shore in early May to watch red-knot migration.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
MIDDLE TOWNSHIP, N.J. - The horseshoe crab was weird long before it had a name, a survivor whose 10 eyes have seen dinosaurs, mass extinctions and mankind's march up the food chain. For humans, these living fossils have proved profitable. First, it was discovered that horseshoe crabs made good bait for catching conch and eel, and later a lucrative use was found for their lifesaving blood. Now the South Jersey shores of the Delaware Bay have become a battleground for a fight over the ancient creature, involving fishermen, environmentalists, politicians, scientists and bird lovers.
NEWS
October 7, 2012 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
ALTOONA, Pa. - The sound starts as a low moan from somewhere around the mountain. "Train's coming," says Joanne Brown. She and her husband, Sam, are "escaped Californians" with a home in South Dakota. As retirees, they have been traveling the United States in an RV for 16 months. And now, in early fall, they have come to Horseshoe Curve - "World Famous Horseshoe Curve," as the old postcards always said. On any day in good weather, you'll find travelers from seemingly everywhere standing by the fence here to watch the freights coming down the line, from Chicago in the west and Philadelphia in the east.
NEWS
September 1, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers and Erin Quinn, Inquirer Staff Writers
Marine biologist Chris Wojcik spent months building a 46-foot horseshoe crab replica, meant to function as an artificial reef off the New Jersey coast. The plan Thursday was to sink the anatomically proportionate concrete sculpture - and the 50-foot barge to which it was bolted - three miles east of Mantoloking in Ocean County. The work would rest on the ocean floor, providing an environment for lobsters, fish, and about 150 other species, according to the state Department of Environmental Protection, which gave the operation its approval.
SPORTS
January 27, 2012 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
While introducing the Colts' new coach, Chuck Pagano, on Thursday, Indianapolis owner Jim Irsay included a blunt message for the team's erstwhile quarterback, Peyton Manning: Shut up. Seems Manning told the Indianapolis Star on Tuesday that the mood around Colts headquarters was kind of tense. Folks were nervous, he said, about the purge of the vice chairman, general manager, and coach. "I don't think it's in the best interest to paint the horseshoe in a negative light, I really don't," Irsay said.
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