CollectionsHorticulture
IN THE NEWS

Horticulture

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doug Croft grew up in rural Virginia, a hobby gardener who studied finance at Virginia Tech and later took a job budgeting and forecasting for defense contractors. He had all the trappings of success. Then one day - epiphany. He was outside his Alexandria, Va., home, "correcting the mistakes of a landscaping company hired by the condo association, when it suddenly dawned on me that this could be a career. I could get paid to do this," recalls Croft, who decided to return to Virginia Tech to study horticulture.
NEWS
January 7, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Coming from image-conscious professionals who prefer to gush about the beauty of flowers and the joys of growing vegetables, the words were downright shocking: "Horticulture is under siege. " They jumped off a three-page letter penned by a half-dozen of the country's most prominent plant people sent in December to 800 schools and universities, government agencies, industry associations, and growers of everything from almonds to onions. Clearly, horticulture - once a priority, if not an obsession, for generations of Americans - is in trouble.
NEWS
January 13, 1986 | By Laura Quinn, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Young, one of Philadelphia's first botanists, collected material for his book on native North American plants by peering over the garden wall of his rival, John Bartram. Young's action represents one of the darker moments in the history of horticulture in Philadelphia. Young, who published his book in Paris in 1783, was willing to go to extraordinary lengths to become the first man to introduce exotic American plants to European connoisseurs. "He was no humble man and was rather sneaky," said James Mears, a former head of botany for the Academy of Natural Sciences and the curator of a new exhibit on the city's horticulture.
NEWS
January 29, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In 1773, the same year a crowd of colonists crept aboard English ships in Boston Harbor and dumped cases of tea into the dark waters, a Chester County native named Humphry Marshall planted a small garden behind his home in Marshallton, West Bradford Township. To present-day horticulturists and historians, Marshall's gentlemanly pursuit is now considered to be a turning point in American history as dramatic as the Boston Tea Party. Marshall, a stonemason, miller and Quaker farmer who built his own home, complete with a small observatory and a hothouse, probably thought nothing of his gardening pursuit, which he took up in earnest at the then-advanced age of 51. Advised by area doctors and even a local herbalist, known as Indian Hannah, on what to include in the garden, Marshall planted rows of medicinal herbs, native plants, and exotics grown from seeds he obtained from a group of gardeners and scientists he regularly corresponded with in Europe.
NEWS
June 1, 1998 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Delaware County high-school students in vocational-education programs can turn their thumbs green through a new horticulture curriculum that will be offered at Tyler Arboretum in Middletown Township in September. The Delco Chamber of Commerce, the arboretum and the Delaware County Intermediate Unit have designed the vo-tech horticulture class to prepare students for jobs in such fields as turf management. Hands-on instruction for the year-long course will be conducted at the arboretum, said Nancy Quinn Kelly, intermediate-unit spokeswoman.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | By Jane G. Pepper, FOR THE INQUIRER
Moaning to Rodney Haines about the damage that deer do in a garden brings little sympathy. "How would you like to contend with a bunch of bears and a few giraffes in your garden, not to mention emu and elephants?" he counters. As horticulture foreman for the Zoological Society of Philadelphia, Haines deals with the above and plenty more, and loves it. He's worked at the Philadelphia Zoo since 1977 and is always prepared for a challenge. When you visit the zoo this spring, take a look at the horticulture in and around Bear Country.
NEWS
October 21, 1998 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Four students who attend The Shipley School, a private school in Bryn Mawr, recently won awards at the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's Harvest Show. In the youth division, Sarah Hamilton, a senior, won first prize for her Haworthia aristata. In the dish-garden division, Diana Schwab, a junior, won second prize, and Jenna Fitch, a junior, won third prize. Naomi Haskell, a junior, won the High School Gardeners Award. The Shipley horticulture club, Sprouts, won the blue ribbon for Horticulture and Artistic Classes.
NEWS
March 10, 1991 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
A student would find it hard to choose a more attractive campus than Longwood Gardens, one of the nation's leading display gardens. Longwood sponsors a wide range of short courses and also offers a two-year intensive program for professional gardeners. Since the two-program began in 1970, 114 students have graduated. About 90 percent have gone on to careers in horticulture, and of these, half are in commercial businesses, and the rest work in public gardens and arboretums. Among the graduates are directors of horticulture for university campuses, general managers of nurseries and curators of plant collections in arboretums throughout the country.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles Holman, 83, formerly of Rittenhouse Square, a retired lumber company executive and horticulturist, died of cancer Monday, Dec. 12, at Northeast Regional Hospice in Scranton. Mr. Holman volunteered and donated trees for the colonial garden maintained by the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society in Society Hill. He was a volunteer at the Shofuso Japanese House and Garden in Fairmount Park, and a volunteer at Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill. "Charlie has been a friend, a hardworking horticulture volunteer, and supporter for over 30 years," said Paul W. Meyer, director of the Morris Arboretum.
NEWS
February 3, 2008 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
In the starkness of midwinter, bright, vibrant flowers were in full bloom last weekend at the most unusual of places: the Deptford Mall. Horticulture students from throughout South Jersey competed in the 27th annual New Jersey Southern Regional Student Flower Show at center court by Macy's. They came from 11 technical and high schools, including Camden County Technical Schools and the Burlington County Institute of Technology, and created close to 250 ornamental displays in more than 30 categories.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2016 | By Virginia A. Smith, For The Inquirer
The garden in May makes David Jensen's heart soar, especially the last two weeks, for all the floral delights popping to life around this time. Irises and daffodils are favorites, but like most gardeners, his list is way longer. "You could spend your annual vacation in the garden during those two weeks," says this former Moorestown resident and globe-trotting Comcast executive, who just might do that someday. First, he wants to share the story of his splendid South Jersey garden in a new book, The Garden Interior: A Year of Inspired Beauty (Morgan James Publishing, $17.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2016
Get Your Gardens Ready for the Wilmington City Gardens Contest Learn about native plants that visually enhance urban gardens & attract pollinators. Delaware Center for Horticulture, 1810 N. Dupont St., Wilmington. $15. 3/31. 6-7 pm.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
In June, Jenny Rose Carey left Temple University-Ambler, where she had headed up the arboretum for almost a decade and taught horticulture for two years before that. She was eager to travel and write a book about early-20th-century gardens in Philadelphia, one of her many interests. And for a while, she did both, writing and visiting family in England (she's from Kent), and exploring the flora of the American West. Then, in December, surprising news: Carey would become the new director of Meadowbrook Farm in Abington Township, which J. Liddon Pennock Jr. bequeathed to the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society upon his death in 2003.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's a given in the gardening world that wintertime is for resting, recharging, and reimagining our next - and best - garden ever. But, increasingly, the off-season is for learning. The Philadelphia region, which immodestly but accurately touts itself as "America's garden capital," with 30 public gardens, arboretums and historic landscapes within 30 miles of the city, offers scores of classes, workshops and programs to keep you in the game till spring. You can find the whole collection at www.americasgardencapital.org . On Jan. 24, for example, a panel of Barnes Arboretum School graduates will present an hourlong program on careers in horticulture at the Barnes Foundation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the vast front lawn of Abraham Lincoln High School in the Mayfair section of Northeast Philadelphia, small groups of students are scattered about, planting a dozen fledgling trees. In each group, one kid has a shovel. Another tamps down the dirt. A third pounds stakes into the ground to keep the tree straight. One more is at the ready with a hose. Wait a minute. It's November. It's 35 degrees out here! But it's not too late to plant trees - the soil is still warm - and the kids, Lincoln's ornamental-horticulture students, are into it. They're a relatively rare breed in 21st-century high schools, where plant-related instruction - if it exists at all - is more likely to be about healthy eating and growing fresh vegetables.
NEWS
September 24, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frances Grace Murphy Cooper, 96, formerly of Springfield, Delaware County, a skilled gardener and horticultural volunteer, died Monday, Sept. 1, of renal cancer at the Philip Hulitar Inpatient Hospice in Providence, R.I. Born in Rutherford, N.J., she was the second of six children. The lively Murphy household moved to various places before finally settling in Philadelphia. During the Depression, the family's candy business kept it afloat. The children worked the streets "with boxes like the cigarette girls in Las Vegas" selling chocolate and nut candy made by their mother, Ella Schneider Murphy, in her kitchen.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do not get Allen Lacy going on the subject of Bradford pear trees or forsythia bushes unless you want to get an earful. He considers them common and overplanted, and you won't find a single one in the Linwood Arboretum in Linwood, N.J., which Lacy created five years ago and somehow manages to keep going with his septuagenarian wife, Hella, a half-dozen volunteers, a surfeit of optimism, and hardly any money. Lacy calls it "the smallest arboretum in the world," but its wish list may be the largest.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deer and plants: As any suburbanite knows, it's a marriage made in horticultural hell. But Chuck Feld thought he was in the clear. Although 30 deer regularly cruised through Birmingham Gardens, his four-acre wholesale nursery in West Chester, thousands of boxwoods he was cultivating remained blessedly untouched. Feld's "box," as it's known, may have defeated the deer, but it was helpless against a new scourge: boxwood blight, which first showed up in Europe in the mid-1990s and in Connecticut and North Carolina in late 2011.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every Philadelphia Flower Show has a vibe that gets communicated in a one-word answer to this question: What'd you think of the show? Here's the word on 2014: Different . In random interviews at Friday's preview for members of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, which produces the show, visitors again and again described it that way. This show is, quite literally, different. The theme this year is ARTiculture, the nexus of art and horticulture, which is a complete departure from the themes of recent years.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|