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Hospice

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NEWS
July 12, 1989 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his right hand, he wielded a plastic green spatula instead of a crozier. Over his blue shirt and his black clerical vest, he wore a clear plastic apron instead of ornate ceremonial vestments. For more than two hours yesterday afternoon, Archbishop Anthony J. Bevilacqua, sleeves rolled up to his elbows, dished up dessert for 574 men, some of them homeless and all of them hungry, at St. John's Hospice for Transient Men in the 1200 block of Race Street. The archbishop said that he had come to the hospice "to see and to serve.
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Betak, the largest and one of only two AIDS hospices in the city, could shut in June due to money problems worsened by the state's failure to provide promised financial support, a Betak official said last night. The Rev. Arnold L. Tiemeyer, president of the Lutheran Home at Germantown, which runs Betak, said the 43-bed hospice had not received a $415,000 grant from the state Health Department it was supposed begin getting last July 1. A state Health Department spokesman last night said he was unaware of the circumstances and couldn't comment.
NEWS
August 9, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
AIDS patient Aileen Getty, the 36-year-old heiress to the Getty oil fortune, vows that although she's raising money to fund AIDS hospices, she'll never stay in one. Getty discovered she had the HIV virus nearly 10 years ago. She's had AIDS for six years and said she contracted the disease through unprotected sex during a brief affair while she was married to Elizabeth Taylor's son, Christopher Wilding. How can she be so sure she won't spend her last days in a hospice? The answer is simple but chilling: She says she will commit suicide when she is "no longer capable of giving my children anything more.
NEWS
November 16, 1998 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Around holidays, many companies help the less fortunate. At GMAC Mortgage Corp.'s Horsham office, employees take community service personally year-round. The company's effort involves Keystone House, an independent, nonprofit Wyndmoor, Montgomery County, hospice certified by Medicare and Medicaid. GMAC employees are regular volunteers at Keystone. They work with patients and have done carpentry, maintenance and painting there. Keystone House occupies an 18th-century Victorian manor house on a wooded, 2 1/2-acre lot, and "great pains are taken to avoid being an austere, clinical facility," said Bernadette Gallagher, director of volunteers.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | By Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
A group of West Mount Airy residents asked City Council's Rules Committee yesterday to reject a plan to fund a nursing home for AIDS patients in their neighborhood. The residents said the facility, which would house 44 AIDS patients in various stages of the disease, would destroy what one described as "the most successfully integrated area in the United States. " The project, located at the former Arden Hall Nursing Home at Mount Airy Avenue and McCallum Street, is the creation of the Lutheran Home at Germantown, an old-age home, and is supported by the Hospital Authority of Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 9, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
FLOYD SLOWLY hobbles out of the kitchen on his gangly old legs. He wobbles past a portrait of himself in the living room and several framed photos of his life. This is when he was a kid. This is when he went to the beach. This is him with his best friend. He's had a good life, and he has been loved, maybe even a little more than most. A man now visiting Floyd in his living room will bring him death soon, when life becomes too much to bear. He will bring it to Floyd at his home, in the arms of those he loves the most.
NEWS
October 18, 1988 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Clarence Young, 52, who police say is a "street person," yesterday was given residence in a state prison by Common Pleas Judge Carolyn E. Temin. The judge sentenced Young to four to 10 years in prison for severely slashing an employee of the St. John's Hospice, on Race Street near 12th, March 10. Young was convicted of aggravated assault and a weapons offense. The victim, Jeff Anderson, 36, who required 30 stitches in his face and left arm after the attack, asked Common Pleas Judge Carolyn E. Temin to "punish" Young so he wouldn't have the chance to "do it to anyone else.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Casey has pledged technical assistance, and, if necessary, additional funds to keep Betak, the Philadelphia hospice and nursing care facility for people with AIDS, from having to close June 1. "I'm committed to ensuring that people with AIDS have access to desperately needed nursing services," Casey said in a statement released Tuesday. "I will do everything within my power to make sure that the Betak facility remains open. " Betak, which opened in January 1992 in the city's Mount Airy section, is one of only two AIDS hospices in Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | By Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
Last Thursday, Brother Malachy found a few whiskey bottles in the alley beside St. John's Hospice, a shelter for homeless men on Race Street near 12th. And for that reason, the hospice will be closed to outsiders today, he said. "They're drinking and drugging in the yard. The men have been very annoyed about it," said Brother Brendan, who also works at the shelter. "We're getting fearful. They're very wild. " The hospice will be open to the 47 men who sleep there nightly, but the 600 or so outsiders who come from other shelters every day to eat or get clothes will find a closed door, Brother Malachy said.
NEWS
March 22, 2005 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dominique Hanks really should be out of her wheelchair and lying down with her feet up. But she won't do that. She just can't. The 55-year-old woman thinks that by being in front of Terri Schiavo's hospice she's helping "to save somebody's life. " For the last several weeks, she has left her apartment just up the street every day and spent several hours, at least, in front of the hospice. It's painful, she says. "It kills my back and my neck. I'm harming myself, but I don't care.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 2, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Jack Cutler, 89, of Elkins Park and later Boca Raton, Fla., whose rise from humble beginnings to become a physician epitomized the American Dream, died Monday, Jan. 11, of prostate cancer at Hospice by the Sea in Florida. During a 48-year career, Dr. Cutler delivered thousands of babies in the Philadelphia area, including the comic Bob Saget and the doctor's own middle son, Peter. He held clinical appointments and teaching posts at various local hospitals, including Abington Memorial Hospital, Einstein Medical Center, Rolling Hill Hospital, Jeanes Hospital, and Allegheny University Medical Center.
NEWS
January 12, 2016
By Perry Farmer and Barbara Ebling It's January, and families are facing some serious decisions about quality of life. For some, it may mean something as simple as a new gym membership. For others, the decision is far more serious. Many are looking for ways to ease the pain of a terminally ill family member through a regimen of palliative care. This year, more physicians will be doing advanced care planning. If you have Medicare, your doctor will now be reimbursed for an appointment to discuss the type of life you want when ill. Palliative care may be part of that conversation.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samaritan Healthcare & Hospice Inc. of Marlton has begun site work for a $15 million freestanding inpatient hospice facility in Voorhees, near the Virtua medical complex on Route 73, the tax-exempt organization said. Samaritan, which had $28.7 million in revenue in 2013, according to its tax return, said the 30,000-square-foot facility with 18 private rooms would be South Jersey's only freestanding hospice center. The organization already has an inpatient hospice center in a wing of Virtua Memorial Hospital in Mount Holly.
NEWS
February 23, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may be the fact that Atul Gawande is a doctor - a Harvard doctor, yet - that draws readers to his books on our flawed medical system. But he wouldn't make the best-seller lists if he wrote - or thought - like most doctors. This is a guy with one of those renaissance-man resumés that makes even quite accomplished people look like slackers. Stanford undergrad. Rhodes scholar studying philosophy. Health-care adviser to President Bill Clinton. Medical degree and master's in public health from Harvard.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Bitros has a lovely life. She lives in a beautiful restored barn in Langhorne, dates a kind man, sees her grandchildren twice a week. She woke up on a recent Monday and found her frying pan in her refrigerator. She has no idea when or why she put it there. Bitros, 64, is a former hospice nurse and educator who has seen many people with dementia die. She was so concerned about her own memory losses - entire blocks of time vanished, what she called intermittent amnesia - that she had herself tested by three neurologists: brain scans, a spinal tap, the full workup.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
  It is called Sacred Heart Home, and its work is just that: sacred. For 84 years, a group of nuns has been caring for poor people dying from cancer in their gleaming home on the edge of Hunting Park. They do it free of charge. The Dominican Sisters of Hawthorne accept no payment of any kind from patients, insurance companies, or the government. Though its sisters are Roman Catholic, Sacred Heart receives no funding stream from any diocese or church.   "Isn't that a miracle?"
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the nearly 41/2 years of Nancy Carolan's battle with acute myeloid leukemia, her oncologist had pulled her from the brink several times. Strong-willed and brave, Carolan had endured infections, brutal rounds of chemotherapy, and a bone-marrow transplant. She was an optimist who wanted to believe she could beat the blood cancer. By August, though, her sisters could see that Carolan, 63, had lost the fight. She was hospitalized, very sick and still receiving aggressive care.
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia lawyer Francis Ballard, 88, a cofounder of the first hospice in Pennsylvania and the first in-home hospice nationwide, died of pulmonary fibrosis while in hospice care at Cathedral Village in Roxborough on Friday, June 20. Mr. Ballard, a Philadelphia native, was born to be an attorney. His grandfather cofounded a law practice that is now the national firm Ballard Spahr, and in 1949 Francis Ballard joined his father and an older brother there. He attended Chestnut Hill Academy, now Springside Chestnut Hill Academy, before attending boarding school at St. George's School in Newport, R.I. He graduated from Yale University in 1946, and he earned his law degree two years later from the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A VETERAN federal prosecutor passionately told a judge yesterday that Alex Pugman, a leading defendant in a Medicare fraud case, "was without a doubt the most exceptional cooperator I have worked with. " Pugman, who was the director and co-owner of the now-defunct Home Care Hospice in Northeast Philly, helped explain the roles of other participants in the scheme, pointed out the fraud in the agency's records, and testified at two grand juries and at three trials, Assistant U.S. Attorney Suzanne Ercole said.
NEWS
April 28, 2014 | By Francesca Serritella, For The Inquirer
Last week, we lost our beloved Mother Mary. She passed peacefully at home, without pain, surrounded by all of us. It still hardly feels real to me, so it isn't easy to write about. My head, and my heart, aren't ready to put her in the past tense. I feel lucky I was able to be with her for the last weeks she was home with us. I tried to help however I could and keep her company the rest of the time. But hospice is a game you play to lose, and it was difficult to adjust. Often, I felt helpless.
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