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Hospital Beds

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NEWS
April 3, 2000 | By Thom Guarnieri, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A distraught elderly woman seeking a referral to a psychiatric hospital. A boy with a serious nosebleed. A woman with an ectopic pregnancy and another with chest pains. The patients show up at City Avenue Hospital at the rate of about 10 a day. Though officially closing today, the hospital will continue to provide a small outpost of medical care. But the Patient Access Center, staffed by a doctor and two nurses, will remain open only until May 31, offering care to the community 12 hours a day. The hospital turned its short-procedures unit into the Access Center when the emergency room closed last Monday.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1988 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
Hahnemann University and the four-hospital United Hospitals system this morning announced an agreement to merge, forming the region's largest health care system. The merger, to be completed by Sept. 30, will create an organization with annual revenues of more than $500 million, 1,329 hospital beds, and a work force of more than 6,800, including 2,400 doctors. The merger involves no exchange of funds. United Hospitals, formed in 1980, is made up of St. Christopher's Hospital for Children; Lawndale Community Hospital in the Northeast; Warminster General Hospital in Bucks County; and Rolling Hill Hospital in Elkins Park.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1988 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and Methodist Hospital yesterday announced plans to form an affiliation and share staff, technology and medical expertise. Executives of the institutions hope the move will allow the hospitals, both financially strong and operating at relatively high occupancy rates, to avoid costly duplication of services and equipment. "This will be a preferred affiliation, which means Methodist will remain a separate entity - separately licensed, with its own board of trustees and staff - but with linkages to Jefferson at the medical staff and administrative levels," said Michael J. Bradley, vice president for health services at Thomas Jefferson University.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1994 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. Healthcare Inc., of Blue Bell, said yesterday that it had expanded its position in Southeastern Pennsylvania by agreeing to coordinate health-care services with one of the region's dominant health systems. By working with the Allegheny Health, Education & Research Foundation, U.S. Healthcare said it would be able to enlist more doctors in its network of managed health-care services and solidify its relationship with Allegheny's five hospitals in the region. Allegheny is a health system with 2,000 physicians, 2,622 hospital beds and more than 18,000 employees in Pittsburgh and Southeastern Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Eric Heil was a senior systems engineering student at the University of Pennsylvania eight years ago, he volunteered to help a nursing-school professor with research aimed at helping doctors make better decisions about which elderly hospital patients needed additional care after discharge. Now 30, Heil is chief executive and cofounder, along with Kathryn H. Bowles, the nursing professor he worked with, of RightCare Solutions Inc., a Fort Washington firm that has licensed the information technology that came out of Bowles' research.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  When Eric Heil was a senior systems engineering student at the University of Pennsylvania eight years ago, he volunteered to help a nursing-school professor with research aimed at helping doctors make better decisions about which elderly hospital patients needed additional care after discharge. Now 30, Heil is chief executive and cofounder, along with Kathryn H. Bowles, the nursing professor he worked with, of RightCare Solutions Inc., a Fort Washington firm that has licensed the information technology that came out of Bowles' research.
NEWS
August 2, 1995 | By Jennifer Wing, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Malawi toddlers on yellow hospital sheets, with an American doctor examining their polio-stricken joints. A beggar with small wood crutches. Another patient with a hand amputated. These are some of the images that orthopedic surgeon Robert Cram, 78, has seen - and expects to see again. He is preparing to return to Malawi to provide medical care and training on behalf of Rotary Club International. On Friday, Cram will make what he says will be the last of the six such trips he has made over the last 15 years.
NEWS
March 11, 1998 | By Eric Dyer, John Way Jennings and Amy Rosenberg, FOR THE INQUIRER Inquirer correspondent Lillian Micko contributed to this article
A two-alarm fire at Shore Memorial Hospital here required the temporary relocation of about 130 patients - mostly to elsewhere in the main hospital building, authorities said. About a half-dozen maternity patients and their babies were transferred to Atlantic City Medical Center. The fire, which broke out about 5 p.m. yesterday, was quickly brought under control and resulted in no apparent injuries, said hospital spokeswoman Margie Barham. However, flames and thick black smoke were seen throughout the area.
NEWS
July 13, 1988 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
As vice president and chief operating officer for Zurbrugg Memorial Hospitals, John Tegley is proud of the hospital system he helps to run, but he'll be the first to admit that it doesn't always run efficiently. Constructed in the early 1960s when more hospital beds were needed because hospital stays were longer, the Rancocas Valley division in Willingboro is a maze of corridors and small rooms. Tegley is responsible for the daily operation of the two hospitals in the system - one located in Riverside and the other in Willingboro.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer
A CHINESE-TAKEOUT owner, confined for more than 21 months to hospital beds since he was viciously attacked outside his West Oak Lane business in 2010, died Thursday. Jicun Wu, 44, was featured in a November 2010 Daily News article about the perils faced by Chinese-immigrant owners in running a takeout in the city. On the morning of June 8, 2010, Malik Niblack, then 21, who lived near the takeout, waited outside the eatery on 66th Avenue near Uber Street. After Wu returned from buying groceries, Niblack punched him to the ground, then kicked him at least 10 times, severely damaging his pancreas and intestines, as Wu went in and out of consciousness.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 1, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
EACH NEW candle that flickered on a cake meant another year for Marcus, one more improbable birthday, another small victory in a long battle against a lone bullet. His latest cake was presented Sunday night, July 21, inside a dining hall at St. Joe's Prep, his alma mater in North Philly. Embedded in the icing was a picture of a red Lamborghini, the car he swore he'd own after becoming a brain surgeon. Marcus, Happy 40th Birthday was written across it. He grew up a block away, at 18th and Thompson streets, and he was shot nearby, at 18th and Ingersoll, two months before graduation in 1991.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  When Eric Heil was a senior systems engineering student at the University of Pennsylvania eight years ago, he volunteered to help a nursing-school professor with research aimed at helping doctors make better decisions about which elderly hospital patients needed additional care after discharge. Now 30, Heil is chief executive and cofounder, along with Kathryn H. Bowles, the nursing professor he worked with, of RightCare Solutions Inc., a Fort Washington firm that has licensed the information technology that came out of Bowles' research.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Eric Heil was a senior systems engineering student at the University of Pennsylvania eight years ago, he volunteered to help a nursing-school professor with research aimed at helping doctors make better decisions about which elderly hospital patients needed additional care after discharge. Now 30, Heil is chief executive and cofounder, along with Kathryn H. Bowles, the nursing professor he worked with, of RightCare Solutions Inc., a Fort Washington firm that has licensed the information technology that came out of Bowles' research.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer
A CHINESE-TAKEOUT owner, confined for more than 21 months to hospital beds since he was viciously attacked outside his West Oak Lane business in 2010, died Thursday. Jicun Wu, 44, was featured in a November 2010 Daily News article about the perils faced by Chinese-immigrant owners in running a takeout in the city. On the morning of June 8, 2010, Malik Niblack, then 21, who lived near the takeout, waited outside the eatery on 66th Avenue near Uber Street. After Wu returned from buying groceries, Niblack punched him to the ground, then kicked him at least 10 times, severely damaging his pancreas and intestines, as Wu went in and out of consciousness.
NEWS
August 4, 2011 | By Mohannad Sabry, McClatchy Newspapers
CAIRO - Bedridden and dressed in prison whites, gray hair poking through his familiar jet-black dye job, the 83-year-old ousted president of Egypt, Hosni Mubarak, made a stunning court appearance here Wednesday to answer charges of corruption and plotting to kill protesters who demanded his resignation. "I totally deny all charges," Mubarak said through a microphone. It was a watershed moment in modern Middle Eastern history: a seemingly invincible man who epitomized a generation of Arab autocrats, a stalwart U.S. ally who ruled unchecked for nearly 30 years over the most populous Arab nation, wheeled into a steel defendants' cage in a makeshift courtroom at a police academy that once bore his name.
NEWS
July 23, 2011 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
IN THE BRIGHT GYM of Good Shepherd Penn Partners' physical rehabilitation center in West Philadelphia, Erik Simmons sits at a weight machine, repeatedly pulling down 70 pounds from an overhead pulley. "Feeling all right?" occupational therapist Karly Streisfeld asks. The 19-year-old Germantown man nods, grins and does two more reps than she has requested. She rolls her eyes but smiles. "He wants it so bad I'm worried he'll work through the pain we don't want," she explains.
NEWS
February 1, 2011 | By VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
Lying in his hospital bed in a conference room at an Albert Einstein Medical Center rehab center, the frail owner of a Chinese takeout restaurant lifted his bone-thin arm and pointed at his accused attacker. Municipal Judge Wendy Pew and two staffers had taken the subway up Broad Street to hold the unusual preliminary hearing in the makeshift courtroom for the man accused of attacking Jicun Wu. By the hearing's end, Pew ordered Malik Niblack - who sat shackled in a wheelchair - held for trial for attempted murder as well as for previous aggravated-assault charges he faced in the attack outside Wu's West Oak Lane restaurant last June.
NEWS
March 10, 2005 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The six-month-long effort to revive Woman's Medical Hospital in East Falls has failed, leaving a gap in health-care services for many people in the neighborhoods surrounding the hospital. Employees were told yesterday that a poor financial condition and prospects meant the end of the institution formerly known as Medical College of Pennsylvania Hospital. Ambulances are going to other hospitals, and efforts are under way to discharge patients or transport them to other city hospitals by noon Saturday, the hospital said in a statement.
NEWS
September 6, 2002 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While Doylestown's Justin Guarini wore a grin on the final weeks of Fox's American Idol, the 23-year-old was weathering a family crisis: His mother, Kathy, was facing major surgery. Surgeons removed her left kidney and a tumor last Friday in a Los Angeles hospital. Yesterday, shortly after surgical staples were removed, Kathy Guarini said she was upbeat, although biopsy results were not complete. "I'm just projecting everything is going to be fine. That's what my internist said," she said.
NEWS
October 4, 2001 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Within the next few weeks, the Crozer-Keystone Health System, already the largest health-care provider in Delaware County, plans to launch a three-year, $42 million expansion project that will add needed emergency-room space, hospital beds or parking spaces at three of its six facilities. In an interview this week, Gerald Miller, the health system's president and chief executive officer, and Joan K. Richards, its chief operating officer, said that a new emergency room to be built on a parking lot in front of the Crozer-Chester Medical Center in Upland will be triple the size of the current one. A five-story parking garage will be built a short distance away.
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