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Hospital Food

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NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When you think of safety mishaps at hospitals, what likely comes to mind is patients who got surgery on the wrong leg or were exposed to deadly bacteria. Those are problems that have received widespread attention from safety experts. A recent report by the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority highlights another potential danger in hospitals: food. Snicker all you like about the quality of hospital food. That's not what the report was about. It looked at mistakes involving patients with special dietary needs who got the wrong food.
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - People nervously waiting around in New York City hospitals for loved ones to come out of surgery can't smoke. In a few months from now, they can't have a supersized fast-food soda. And soon, they won't even be able to get a candy bar out of the vending machine or a piece of fried chicken from the cafeteria. In one of his latest health campaigns, Mayor Michael Bloomberg is aiming to banish sugary and fatty foods from both public and private hospitals. In the past year, 16 private hospitals have signed on. Earlier this month, the city moved to ban the sale of big sodas and other sugary drinks at fast-food restaurants and theaters, beginning in March.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Who are the most important chefs in Philly? Some, like Keith Lucas and other cooks in the region's nonprofit kitchens, may not be names you've heard. But for thousands of Philadelphians suffering from AIDS, cancer, cardiac disease, or diabetes, Lucas - and the 15,000 free meals he oversees each week from the Center City kitchen at MANNA - is an essential lifeline to the nourishment and dignity of a proper supper. With 2,000 extra meals for Thanksgiving, Lucas, 53, a Chestnut Hill resident, paused to chat about a career cooking behind the scenes, his star turn on reality TV, and why hospital food is awful.
NEWS
August 19, 1991 | By Inquirer staff
A FULL PLATE Georgia and South Carolina were almost a tie. But there was no question about whose license plates were the worst. Indiana's. "Indiana's 'Hoosier Hospitality' mustered six votes," said Gary Kincade, secretary-treasurer of the Automobile License Plate Collectors Association. About 400 of the group's members voted last week in the 19th annual contest that seeks to encourage states to make more attractive license plates. South Carolina edged out Georgia, 131 to 129. "South Carolina's plate is just real colorful, and the way they blend the design in so it wouldn't get in the way of the numbers was really first- rate," Kincade said.
NEWS
January 21, 1997
He wasn't one to complain, this former chief of a Philadelphia hospital: Said he felt "adequately compensated" even in his first job in the health-care business - as a 65-cents-an-hour orderly during high school. Well, things were just a bit different during chief executive I. Donald Snook's last few years at Presbyterian Hospital. His compensation more than doubled between 1993 and 1995, to $469,775. It was Mr. Snook's good fortune to round out his career at the West Philadelphia hospital during a time of unprecedented growth in executive pay and benefits at nonprofit hospitals.
SPORTS
April 19, 2000 | By Frank Bertucci, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Larry Wilson, the head track and cross-country coach at Gwynedd-Mercy Academy and the founder and head coach of the Ambler Olympic Club, is recuperating at his home in the Mount Airy section of Philadelphia after suffering a slight stroke during an April 11 meet at Lower Moreland High. Wilson was taken to Abington Hospital and was released Sunday. The coach had been watching freshman Meghan Bishop compete when he became ill. "I get excited and start hollering during a meet, and my little freshman was running a great race," Wilson said yesterday.
NEWS
October 20, 1993 | By Robert Zausner and Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
An upbeat and somewhat plumper Gov. Casey left a Pittsburgh hospital yesterday after a three-week stay to combat several infections, saying he'll be ready "fairly soon" to resume his old job. "I'm making plans actively now to come back," Casey told reporters at an airport near Harrisburg, adding, "It's time now to move into a new phase here, which is the active phase. " The governor looked and sounded perhaps the best he has since undergoing a heart-liver transplant on June 14. He was even back to wearing what he called his old "uniform" - a coat and tie. "I've got to get my uniform on. If you're going to play the game you've got to have your uniform, right?"
NEWS
March 24, 1989 | By Robin Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Secretary of Veterans Affairs Edward J. Derwinski yesterday paid a brief visit to the Philadelphia Veterans Administration Medical Center, his first official appearance at a veterans' facility since assuming the new post. "How're they treating you? . . . How's the food here?," Derwinski asked patients during a quick tour led by U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa) and trailed by a phalanx of TV, radio and newspaper reporters. Specter hailed Derwinski's visit as a historic event, noting that it was the first such tour anywhere by a secretary of veterans affairs - a new cabinet-level office created by President Bush.
NEWS
January 6, 1995 | by Joanne Sills, Daily News Staff Writer
George E. Young, who worked in diner and restaurant kitchens throughout the area, died last Saturday in a fire at his apartment. He was 54 and lived in Germantown. Young's mother, Gladys De Horry, said her son was always a protector of the family. He called her at least once a day and continued to look out for his three younger sisters long into their adulthood. "He was one great son," De Horry said. "I loved him and I'm going to miss him . . . I'm devastated, but everything God does is for the best and he doesn't make mistakes, so I'm leaning on his everlasting love.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | By Bridget Mount, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Not even being in a hospital bed with one leg strapped up could keep Bill Seidel from enjoying food from the Thunderbird Steak House. "Close to 30 years ago, I had cartilage removed from my knee. During those eight days in the hospital, I missed the 'bird. " He leaned over the table as if he was about to tell a secret and pointed at owner Bill Greco. "His father sent a baggie every day. I wouldn't eat the hospital food. " The day he was released, his wife came to take him home.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When you think of safety mishaps at hospitals, what likely comes to mind is patients who got surgery on the wrong leg or were exposed to deadly bacteria. Those are problems that have received widespread attention from safety experts. A recent report by the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority highlights another potential danger in hospitals: food. Snicker all you like about the quality of hospital food. That's not what the report was about. It looked at mistakes involving patients with special dietary needs who got the wrong food.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Who are the most important chefs in Philly? Some, like Keith Lucas and other cooks in the region's nonprofit kitchens, may not be names you've heard. But for thousands of Philadelphians suffering from AIDS, cancer, cardiac disease, or diabetes, Lucas - and the 15,000 free meals he oversees each week from the Center City kitchen at MANNA - is an essential lifeline to the nourishment and dignity of a proper supper. With 2,000 extra meals for Thanksgiving, Lucas, 53, a Chestnut Hill resident, paused to chat about a career cooking behind the scenes, his star turn on reality TV, and why hospital food is awful.
NEWS
December 18, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THOMAS EFFERSON University Hospital staff members were puzzled when a Chinese woman who had given birth there wouldn't touch the hospital food. Hospitals, of course, are not famous for gourmet food offerings, but the woman's refusal to eat wasn't because the food was unappetizing. She even turned down Jell-O, juices and salads. Her heritage had taught her that these foods contain "yin," or cold energy, and impede the healing process. When her husband brought her a meal of noodles and rabbit, she dug right in. Joan Ulmer Bretschneider, director of Jefferson's Chinese Community Partnership Program, understood very well what was going on. Jefferson had always made allowances for cultural differences among its patients, but not well enough to suit Bretschneider.
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - People nervously waiting around in New York City hospitals for loved ones to come out of surgery can't smoke. In a few months from now, they can't have a supersized fast-food soda. And soon, they won't even be able to get a candy bar out of the vending machine or a piece of fried chicken from the cafeteria. In one of his latest health campaigns, Mayor Michael Bloomberg is aiming to banish sugary and fatty foods from both public and private hospitals. In the past year, 16 private hospitals have signed on. Earlier this month, the city moved to ban the sale of big sodas and other sugary drinks at fast-food restaurants and theaters, beginning in March.
SPORTS
April 19, 2000 | By Frank Bertucci, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Larry Wilson, the head track and cross-country coach at Gwynedd-Mercy Academy and the founder and head coach of the Ambler Olympic Club, is recuperating at his home in the Mount Airy section of Philadelphia after suffering a slight stroke during an April 11 meet at Lower Moreland High. Wilson was taken to Abington Hospital and was released Sunday. The coach had been watching freshman Meghan Bishop compete when he became ill. "I get excited and start hollering during a meet, and my little freshman was running a great race," Wilson said yesterday.
NEWS
July 13, 1999 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
The moment Lydia R. Clark decided to do something, you could consider it done. She worked in the food services department at Presbyterian Hospital for 33 years, ever since she was 19. Worked her way up to a dietary coordinator. "It was the only job she ever had," said Gilbert Clark, a brother. After her husband, Samuel, died, she faced the prospect of raising then-9-year-old Derrick on her own. And she concluded: "I can do this. " Derrick, now a 32-year-old foundry worker, turned out all right.
NEWS
January 21, 1997
He wasn't one to complain, this former chief of a Philadelphia hospital: Said he felt "adequately compensated" even in his first job in the health-care business - as a 65-cents-an-hour orderly during high school. Well, things were just a bit different during chief executive I. Donald Snook's last few years at Presbyterian Hospital. His compensation more than doubled between 1993 and 1995, to $469,775. It was Mr. Snook's good fortune to round out his career at the West Philadelphia hospital during a time of unprecedented growth in executive pay and benefits at nonprofit hospitals.
NEWS
January 6, 1995 | by Joanne Sills, Daily News Staff Writer
George E. Young, who worked in diner and restaurant kitchens throughout the area, died last Saturday in a fire at his apartment. He was 54 and lived in Germantown. Young's mother, Gladys De Horry, said her son was always a protector of the family. He called her at least once a day and continued to look out for his three younger sisters long into their adulthood. "He was one great son," De Horry said. "I loved him and I'm going to miss him . . . I'm devastated, but everything God does is for the best and he doesn't make mistakes, so I'm leaning on his everlasting love.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | By Bridget Mount, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Not even being in a hospital bed with one leg strapped up could keep Bill Seidel from enjoying food from the Thunderbird Steak House. "Close to 30 years ago, I had cartilage removed from my knee. During those eight days in the hospital, I missed the 'bird. " He leaned over the table as if he was about to tell a secret and pointed at owner Bill Greco. "His father sent a baggie every day. I wouldn't eat the hospital food. " The day he was released, his wife came to take him home.
NEWS
October 20, 1993 | By Robert Zausner and Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
An upbeat and somewhat plumper Gov. Casey left a Pittsburgh hospital yesterday after a three-week stay to combat several infections, saying he'll be ready "fairly soon" to resume his old job. "I'm making plans actively now to come back," Casey told reporters at an airport near Harrisburg, adding, "It's time now to move into a new phase here, which is the active phase. " The governor looked and sounded perhaps the best he has since undergoing a heart-liver transplant on June 14. He was even back to wearing what he called his old "uniform" - a coat and tie. "I've got to get my uniform on. If you're going to play the game you've got to have your uniform, right?"
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