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Hospital Gown

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NEWS
June 14, 1992 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This was not what Bonnie Townsend and John Miccarelli had in mind six months ago when they started planning their wedding. Oh no. Their dream day was supposed to start with an outdoor ceremony in Glenolden Park and end with a reception for 200 at the Collingdale fire hall. There would be a long white dress for Townsend, a tux for Miccarelli, dancing with a disc jockey, food and drink for everyone. Everything was set for June 13. The cake was ordered. The bridesmaids' dresses were ready.
NEWS
February 15, 1996 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A jail inmate recuperating from a hernia operation yesterday overpowered a guard and stole his gun before fleeing in a hospital gown and leading authorities on a car and foot chase. Before he was recaptured, Kevin Jackson, 29, of the 2200 block of North 42d Street in Pennsauken, failed in an attempt to carjack one man but succeeded in another attempt, investigators said. During the 15-minute chase, police said, Jackson struck two police cars, tried to run down a police officer, and crashed the stolen Jeep he was driving into the side of a store.
NEWS
May 26, 2006 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rap musician Beanie Sigel, who in recent years beat attempted-murder charges and served time in federal prison for gun and drug possession, drove himself to the hospital in a Chevy Impala with a baby seat in the back after he was shot early yesterday in what police say was a robbery. By lunchtime, clad in jeans and a hospital gown - and missing the $56,000 watch, $20,000 necklace and cash he said his assailants took - he was cruising away from the emergency room at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in a black Mercedes-Benz R350, playing to the assembled media, which chased the car on 34th Street.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
A fleeing shoplifter landed in the Bucks County Prison Tuesday after two failed attempts to elude police, including an ill-fated escape attempt by swimming the frigid Delaware River, police said. Leonard Pettigrew, 29, of Trenton, began his journey at about 2 p.m. Sunday in Falls Township, when, police said, he fled a West Trenton Avenue 7-Eleven store after stealing cigarettes and razor blades. Falls police officer James Jones said Pettigrew ran east on West Trenton Avenue for several blocks to the Morrisville Shopping Center at West Trenton and Pennsylvania Avenues.
NEWS
August 26, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clifton S. Minshall, 53, of Lower Gwynedd, a former Delaware County law-enforcement officer and a health and safety specialist, died of multiple myeloma Friday at Fox Chase Cancer Center. His cancer was diagnosed in 1993 when his son, Zachary, was 18 months old. "The doctors gave him 18 months to live, but he was determined he was going to help raise our son," said his wife, Sabine Wolters Minshall. She said he had a bone-marrow transplant in 1994 and "was willing to enroll in every clinical trial we could find.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Getting sick teaches many lessons. And before I begin, let me say I know that having foot surgery isn't even being that sick, and certainly not as sick as many people. But it's what I'm working with now, and it taught me several lessons, which I'm about to inflict on you. By the way, I also know that many of these lessons are not exactly news. But I did learn them for myself, and frankly, I think they bear repeating, especially if you've gotten used to living on your own, like me, or if you're just accustomed to being a responsible adult, wherein you take care of yourself, your family, and the tristate area in general.
NEWS
December 26, 1987 | By Dan Meyers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Linda Olmo, 30, lay back in her narrow bed and listened through green earphones to the strange sounds of her Christmas Eve. Over the background roar, she heard a pilot radio for medical specialists to prepare for her arrival. She heard a paramedic announce the latest trend in her wavering heart. She heard her own voice saying that the contractions were getting stronger and heard the doctor announce that, contrary to expectations, it was going to happen right now. And so life began in a helicopter on the night before Christmas.
NEWS
March 4, 1996 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
Cardinal John Krol couldn't speak. His mouth was dry and he could barely move his lips or manage a gasp. In his small, sparse room, he lay in his deathbed, beneath a wire-hung wooden crucifix, surrounded by the simplest of wooden furniture and a few family photographs. He was dying. About a dozen people, including Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua, several priests, nurses and Krol's secretary, stood by his bedside. For hours, they said the rosary and the prayer for the dying as the onetime Philadelphia powerhouse struggled for breath.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"Name?" "Vivian Bearing. " "Doctor?" "Yes. I have a Ph.D. " Wrong answer. Vivian Bearing is indeed a doctor of philosophy, a woman who proudly reports she has made "an immeasurable contribution to the study of English literature. " But the admitting intern at this unnamed hospital seeks merely to know the name of her physician. A renowned specialist in the Holy Sonnets of John Donne, feared for her rigorous and uncompromising academic standards, Dr. Bearing is about to become the studied rather than the studier.
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | By MIKE BARNICLE
A floor nurse came out of the nursery holding the baby girl in her arms. The infant was a few days old and wrapped in a hospital blanket and as soon as the nurse began to talk about the child, tears welled in her eyes. "The story's true," the nurse said. "It's hard to believe," she was told. "It is," she admitted. "What happens now?" the nurse was asked. "We're trying to place her in foster care," she said. "We haven't been able to yet, but we've just started to look.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
The singer-songwriter Matt Duke stood at the end of Sandra Morello's bed in the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, strumming his acoustic guitar and belting out one of his own tunes, "Needle and Thread. " Her head wrapped in a purple bandanna, Morello nodded along. In her arm was an IV delivering an immunosuppressant drug. "To sing your blues away," he serenaded the 43-year-old cancer patient, "and hope for better days. " Morello smiled and clapped. "It definitely makes you feel good," she said.
NEWS
October 9, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
To know Brenda Jones is to get hugged by her. What happens next, often, is you want to send her some fabric. She's the breast-cancer battler I wrote about three years ago whose anger at getting sick found a juicy target in those hideous, backless Johnny coats that hospitals make their patients wear. As she was recovering from radiation treatment, she learned to sew, well enough to start producing fanciful flannel gowns she calls Hug Wraps. She'd given away about 150 of them to fellow cancer patients when I first visited her home in Southampton, N.J., on the edge of the Pine Barrens.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ken Adelberger was sitting in a hospital gown awaiting his surgery when three doctors in white coats approached him. "We're just on our merry-go-rounds," Dr. HuggaBubbe said to him, twirling in a circle. "I can do a cat scan," said Dr. Bea Well, holding up a stuffed cat. Dr. CurlyBubbe handed him a smiley-face sticker and told him to give it to his surgeon to get him in a good mood for the procedure. Adelberger would see several physicians at Lankenau Medical Center in Wynnewood that day, but these three were probably the only ones he asked for a hug. Dr. HuggaBubbe, Dr. Bea Well, and Dr. CurlyBubbe are clowns, part of a brigade of more than 100 colorfully costumed volunteers, most of them retirees, who visit hospital patients under the umbrella of the Bumper "T" Caring Clowns organization.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Getting sick teaches many lessons. And before I begin, let me say I know that having foot surgery isn't even being that sick, and certainly not as sick as many people. But it's what I'm working with now, and it taught me several lessons, which I'm about to inflict on you. By the way, I also know that many of these lessons are not exactly news. But I did learn them for myself, and frankly, I think they bear repeating, especially if you've gotten used to living on your own, like me, or if you're just accustomed to being a responsible adult, wherein you take care of yourself, your family, and the tristate area in general.
NEWS
May 26, 2006 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rap musician Beanie Sigel, who in recent years beat attempted-murder charges and served time in federal prison for gun and drug possession, drove himself to the hospital in a Chevy Impala with a baby seat in the back after he was shot early yesterday in what police say was a robbery. By lunchtime, clad in jeans and a hospital gown - and missing the $56,000 watch, $20,000 necklace and cash he said his assailants took - he was cruising away from the emergency room at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in a black Mercedes-Benz R350, playing to the assembled media, which chased the car on 34th Street.
NEWS
August 26, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clifton S. Minshall, 53, of Lower Gwynedd, a former Delaware County law-enforcement officer and a health and safety specialist, died of multiple myeloma Friday at Fox Chase Cancer Center. His cancer was diagnosed in 1993 when his son, Zachary, was 18 months old. "The doctors gave him 18 months to live, but he was determined he was going to help raise our son," said his wife, Sabine Wolters Minshall. She said he had a bone-marrow transplant in 1994 and "was willing to enroll in every clinical trial we could find.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"Name?" "Vivian Bearing. " "Doctor?" "Yes. I have a Ph.D. " Wrong answer. Vivian Bearing is indeed a doctor of philosophy, a woman who proudly reports she has made "an immeasurable contribution to the study of English literature. " But the admitting intern at this unnamed hospital seeks merely to know the name of her physician. A renowned specialist in the Holy Sonnets of John Donne, feared for her rigorous and uncompromising academic standards, Dr. Bearing is about to become the studied rather than the studier.
NEWS
August 10, 1999 | By Melia Bowie, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Barbara Pastore commands her army of seamstresses with precision, checking off every hour worked, every seam stitched. Standing yesterday amid swatches of brightly colored fabric and sewing machines, she glanced at the ensemble of women gathered in the Colony Club of Ambler - a clubhouse turned temporary clothing factory - and sent her troops a silent message of encouragement. Their mission: sew 100 gowns by October for Operation Smile, a nonprofit organization that provides reconstructive facial surgery to poor, disfigured children and adults worldwide.
LIVING
November 3, 1997 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Daphne Scholinski was a tomboy long after it was considered cute. There were behavioral problems. She abused drugs and alcohol. She skipped school, sassed her parents, threatened to blow up a teacher's car. A neighbor molested her; a baby-sitter liked to fondle the girl and her sister. But those were not the things that professionals targeted when Daphne's desperate parents committed their uncontrollable daughter in 1981, Scholinski contends in a new book. The book begins with the drive she took with her father from their home in Arlington Heights, Ill., to a psychiatric hospital in Chicago.
NEWS
March 4, 1996 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
Cardinal John Krol couldn't speak. His mouth was dry and he could barely move his lips or manage a gasp. In his small, sparse room, he lay in his deathbed, beneath a wire-hung wooden crucifix, surrounded by the simplest of wooden furniture and a few family photographs. He was dying. About a dozen people, including Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua, several priests, nurses and Krol's secretary, stood by his bedside. For hours, they said the rosary and the prayer for the dying as the onetime Philadelphia powerhouse struggled for breath.
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