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Hospitality Industry

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NEWS
May 12, 1997 | By Martin Faye
Thanks to some major milestones achieved by the hospitality industry over the last decade, Philadelphia's path to the next century forecasts near-perfect conditions. The effort has been led by Philadelphia International Airport's capital improvement program, with new Aviation Director Dennis Bouey at the helm. Among its accomplishments are a relocated and expanded international terminal that has facilitated five transatlantic destinations, full-scale improvements to Terminals B and C and the promise of another $500 million in expansion.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1997 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finding satisfied graduates of the Opportunities Inn Hospitality Training Institute isn't particularly tough. Alumni of the eight-year-old program, a division of the nonprofit Opportunities Industrialization Center in North Philadelphia, can be found cooking in restaurants, or checking in guests, cooking meals and cleaning rooms in dozens of hotels across the region. The alums are enthusiastic boosters, saying the OIC program helped turn their lives around. Craig Quinn, 29, is one such graduate.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | By Larry Copeland, Inquirer Staff Writer
They were hard at work at the hotel in North Philadelphia. Two maids cleaned a suite and tidied the bed, leaving crisp corners and neatly folded towels. Waiters served omelets on impeccably arranged place settings in the hotel restaurant. In an office, travel agents typed flight reservations into their computers. But don't bother trying to check in, get a meal or book a flight here. The "employees" are students, training for jobs in Philadelphia's burgeoning hospitality industry through a program that's part of the massive Center City convention center project.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When he was 16, Jeff Arnold started working at a McDonald's restaurant in York, Pa. When the time came to choose a college, Arnold also had chosen a career - in the hospitality industry. "I really enjoyed the concept of what I was doing," Arnold said. "I really enjoyed the idea of helping people out, and the customer service. " With job offers in hand, Arnold is set to graduate from Widener University's School of Hotel and Restaurant Management in Chester in May and enter the growing field of travel and hospitality.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2007 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In speeches before members of the region's hospitality industry yesterday, Mayor Street and Mayor-elect Michael Nutter agreed on one thing: They like the hospitality industry. Hospitably, the audience at the annual membership luncheon of the Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau gave each a standing ovation. Street was being honored for his longtime support for the Convention Center and expanded tourism. Organizers had said Nutter, who resigned in April as chairman of the Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority board, would talk about the future of the tourism industry, but he did not make any specific proposals.
NEWS
February 27, 1992
A Feb. 17 Commentary Page article on the hospitality industry by Ted Hershberg included an erroneous figure. As pointed out by the author, WEFA Group's actual figure for the worldwide hospitality industry is $2 trillion annually.
NEWS
January 8, 2004
HATS OFF to Channel 17, Steve Highsmith and Sen. Fumo for presenting another fine performance of the 2004 Mummers Parade. But the parade could be better served if it were televised by Comcast's CN8. Not only will local viewers, Rose Parade watchers and college bowl game fans be permitted to review the parade again, or for the first time through Comcast's "On Demand" feature, but the parade could now also be presented through its various national...
NEWS
February 17, 1992 | By TED HERSHBERG
Few people get excited when they hear the term hospitality industry talked about as a serious key to Philadelphia's future. That's understandable because economists use a different set of numbers in their economic score cards: manufacturing and services, and within services, wholesale and retail, finance, insurance and real estate, construction, transportation, government. But when the American Express Co. asked the WEFA Group, an economic forecasting firm, to report on the health of the hospitality industry here and abroad - tourism, convention, hotels, restaurants, food, personal services, retail sales, travel and the like - the hospitality industry was the second or third largest industry in each of the world's 10 biggest economies, including America, and worldwide it accounted for $3.5 trillion.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1989 | By Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia plans on being the place for minority conventions. Why? Because it represents a $3 billion market, that's why. The Philadelphia Convention & Visitors Bureau, along with the Greater Philadelphia Hotel Association, announced yesterday plans to carve that niche in the nation's hospitality industry. "It's the second-largest industry," said Thomas O. Muldoon, president of the bureau, referring to the hospitality business in general. "And it's not going to go away.
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NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
Motown was playing at a recent lunch at the Broad Street Ministry. "Stop in the Name of Love," to be specific. On many days, close to 400 men - mostly men - show up in the grand sanctuary here where the likes of department-store magnate John Wanamaker once worshiped, and where nowadays, in the shadow of the Kimmel Center, an experiment in "radical hospitality" has been running for more than three years. Pastor William Golderer, also a cofounder of the Rooster Soup Co. (along with restaurateurs Steven Cook and Michael Solomonov)
FOOD
March 10, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The next big show at the Kimmel Center is going to be one of its most expensive tickets: dinner. The performers? Celebrity Iron Chef Jose Garces and his team. The set? Volvér, a much-awaited jewel box dining room in the Kimmel Center. And not only will its tasting menus instantly become the city's priciest meal, with food alone fluctuating between $150 and $250, it will also become Philly's first restaurant to sell those seats online as a "ticketed experience," prepaid and nonrefundable.
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DID LOU PETRO have a premonition? It was Thanksgiving, and many of his family members were gathered at his home in Ardsley. He took advantage of the opportunity to give a heartfelt talk about how much he loved everybody, how wonderful it was to have such a loving family, and what a great life he'd had. He concluded that if he checked out that night, he would be content. About 5 the next morning, he had a heart attack. After hospitalization and a return home, he died there Dec. 13. He would have celebrated his 82nd birthday Friday.
FOOD
September 7, 2012 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
The hospitality industry, by its very nature, caters to paying customers - their dollars fuel the bars and restaurants, placing patrons and their happiness on a pedestal. But what about the individuals who toil in the back- and front-of-house trenches, those who inspire return visits through consistent cooking and sharp service? The owners of Center City's Good Dog had them in mind when they opened a new bar this summer. On-the-nose name notwithstanding, The Industry, nestled in Pennsport, panders to restaurant workers via discounts (a standing 20 percent off for anyone "in the biz," plus regular late-night specials)
BUSINESS
April 27, 2011 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has a lot of things going for it, but an abundance of jobs isn't one of them - which creates a unique opportunity for the hospitality industry to step up and fill that void, say planning, convention, and tourism officials. Alan Greenberger, the city's deputy mayor of planning and economic development and also its commerce director, said Philadelphia has 30 jobs for every 100 residents, while San Francisco has twice that, with more than 70 jobs for every 100 residents, and Washington has 115 jobs for every 100 people.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2011 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a glittering $783 million Convention Center expansion to showcase, downtown hotels and other stakeholders in Philadelphia's hospitality industry have partnered with city agencies to deal with a highly complex, though hardly new, issue: How to curb aggressive panhandling and encourage the homeless in the Market East district to seek shelter and treatment services. "We need to make the area around the Convention Center more visitor-friendly," said Ed Grose, executive director of the Greater Philadelphia Hotel Association.
NEWS
January 10, 2011 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most salesmen pitch a product or service. As the new head of the Convention and Visitors Bureau, Jack Ferguson sells Philadelphia - its historical and cultural attractions, its hotels and restaurants, its sports teams. That's a tall order for anyone. But for this native Philadelphian, who has logged four decades in the hospitality industry, it seems to come naturally. "If he could dial up a job, this would be it. I don't think there is anything he ever wanted to do other than be president of the agency in charge of bringing conventions and tourists to the city," said Tom Muldoon, whom Ferguson officially replaced as president last Monday.
NEWS
October 12, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial service is planned here Saturday, Oct. 16, for Molly McCaskey Rothgery, 40, a development specialist for the hospitality industry, who died in a murder-suicide Aug. 28 at her home in Bay Village, a suburb of Cleveland, police said. Last December, Mrs. Rothgery moved from Philadelphia with her family to Ohio to be closer to her in-laws. There, she took a job as retail development manager for Great Lakes Brewing Co. Her husband, Michael, 42, worked as a public-school teacher.
NEWS
January 8, 2010 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former public-relations consultant for the African American Museum in Philadelphia is suing its president for slander, contending that a letter she sent to board members resulted in his being informally banned from work in the hospitality business. As the case began yesterday, an attorney for museum president Romona R. Benson acknowledged that the termination letter had contained an erroneous accusation against consultant Joel Avery. But Benson's attorney denied that the letter to nine board members had derailed Avery's once-thriving business or led to his being denied work by the close-knit group of major tourism organizations in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2009 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Center City hoteliers struggle to attract warm bodies to fill their accommodations, the Alexander Inn is luring guests by pricing a few of its rooms at $1 a night. The promotion, which started March 10, even has a name: "the Guest Stimulus Plan. " "It's just been amazing," innkeeper John Cochie said of the response. "People telephone us and ask, 'Is this for real, and how many nights do I have to stay to get the dollar rate?' They're shocked when they're told they just have to stay one night.
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