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Hostage

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NEWS
June 17, 1988 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
It might be instructive to compare the protracted misfortune of Ireland's Joe Doherty in this country with the more celebrated plight of America's Terry Anderson in Lebanon. For three years, three months and three days, former Associated Press correspondent Anderson has been imprisoned in a grim high-rise building in southern Beirut - the longest-held hostage of the Hezbollah Shiite Moslems. Tomorrow, former Irish Republican Army member Doherty begins his sixth year of imprisonment in a grim high-rise building in lower Manhattan - the longest- held hostage of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.
NEWS
June 22, 1999 | by Shantee Woodards, Daily News Staff Writer
Imagine having a career in which you follow no set rules or regulations. You do what you think is right, and if you're successful, the praise never ends. But if you make a mistake, an innocent person dies. Welcome to the world of hostage negotiations. "The idea behind negotiations is to save a life," said Sylvester Johnson, a Philadelphia deputy police commissioner and a former hostage negotiator. "You're going to do everything you possibly can to come to a peaceful solution.
NEWS
January 20, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Prominent politicians yesterday cautioned officials against swapping a Lebanese suspect in the 1985 TWA hijacking for a West German businessman abducted in Beirut. They said a trade would inspire more terrorist attacks. But an experienced West German hostage negotiator advised the government not to extradite the suspect to the United States while the businessman is held hostage. Government spokesmen in Bonn played down reports that the kidnapping in Beirut of businessman Rudolf Cordes was aimed at forcing the release of Mohammed Ali Hamadei, accused of being one of the terrorists who seized the jetliner in June 1985.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
High drama came to a quiet suburban neighborhood yesterday when a man beat and kidnapped his estranged girlfriend and held her hostage at knifepoint for five hours. John Connally, 25, surrendered to Delaware County police after hostage negotiators managed to calm him after he slashed his left wrist in an attempt to kill kimself, police said. "He told negotiators that he wanted to have his girlfriend watch him die," said Clifton Heights Police Chief Ron Berry. Connally was taken to Fitzgerald Mercy Hospital in Darby, and treated for his wrist wound.
NEWS
August 5, 1989
Just as we have shared the anguish of the family of Joseph Cicippio during his ordeal as a hostage in Lebanon, we join them in their sense of relief at his life being spared. The suspense, the smashed hopes, the bitter disappointments, the frustrated fury, the tangled roller-coaster of emotions that must be ripping them up inside - how can anyone else truly comprehend what members of this Norristown family must be experiencing? The videotape of Cicippio's plea - obviously staged by his captors in Lebanon - must have been almost too much to bear.
NEWS
October 28, 1988 | By Todd Richissin, Associated Press Inquirer correspondent Mike Franolich and United Press International contributed to this article
Two murder convicts took a vocational counselor and a teacher's assistant hostage for several hours yesterday at Northern State Prison in what authorities said was a bid by the inmates to be transferred to another prison. Both hostages were released unharmed, and inmates Angel Guzman, 26, of Woodbine, and Edward Robinson, 27, of Camden, surrendered peacefully after freeing their captives, said Capt. Robert Baker of the state Department of Corrections. Annette Martin, 46, a teaching assistant, and Joan Mason, 51, a vocational counselor, both of Newark, were taken hostage at 9:07 a.m. as they conducted a teaching demonstration in the library of the year-old prison.
NEWS
June 12, 1986
Impartial facts and undisputed circumstances are rare commodities in the brutal, murky battlegrounds of guerrilla war. And so, at best, there have been only versions of how eight young West German volunteer construction workers came to be captured and held hostage for 25 days by U.S.-backed rebels in southern Nicaragua. The State Department asserted they wore military garb. The Germans asserted their "humanitarian" mission. Whatever version you accept, it is good news indeed that they have been released, apparently not much worse for their ordeal.
SPORTS
December 16, 1991 | Daily News sports writer Mike Kern from wire reports
For former hostage Thomas Sutherland, there was no better place to be yesterday than Denver's Mile High Stadium, to watch the Denver Broncos play Phoenix. A professor at Colorado State University, Sutherland was freed Nov. 18 after being held in Lebanon for 6 1/2 years by terrorists. Wearing a new orange and blue Broncos warmup jacket, he and his family were guests of the team. He spoke privately to team owner Pat Bowlen and quarterback John Elway before addressing the near-capacity crowd of 74,098 during pregame ceremonies.
NEWS
May 16, 1989 | By Michael E. Ruane, and Amy S. Rosenberg Inquirer Staff Writers
An armed bandit robbed a bank on Philadelphia's Head House Square of more than $7,000 and then took a customer hostage at gunpoint as he made his escape onto the busy streets outside yesterday afternoon, police said. The hostage, with a gun at her back and what a witnesses said was a look of terror on her face, was forced to accompany the man along Second Street for about a block before she was freed unharmed. The man later ducked into a side street, shed the clothing he had been wearing during the holdup and then disappeared, leaving behind the clothes - and more than $3,000 of the stolen money, police said.
NEWS
October 6, 1993 | By Christine Schiavo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bail of $1 million was set yesterday for a Chalfont man charged with sexually assaulting a 42-year-old woman and holding her hostage for 16 hours Monday in her home in Warminster Township. Paul Mutch, 27, is charged with two counts of involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, two counts of criminal trespass, burglary, and 14 misdemeanor counts for allegedly breaking into the home on Woods Lane and holding the woman, her four young children and her teenage nephew at knife-point.
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NEWS
July 27, 2016
Thomas Sutherland, 85, a teacher who was held captive in Lebanon for more than six years, died Friday in Fort Collins, Colo., according to Colorado State University. Mr. Sutherland was released in 1991 and returned home to become professor emeritus at the university. He was one of a number of Americans in Lebanon - including Associated Press bureau chief Terry Anderson - who were kidnapped by terrorist groups in the 1980s. He was dean of the Faculty of Agriculture and Food Science at American University in Beirut when he was taken hostage by Islamic terrorists in 1985.
NEWS
May 30, 2016
Orlando R. Barone is a writer in Doylestown Courage can be difficult to understand. We hear its stories. In 2012, Dilip Joseph, an American doctor, was being held hostage in Afghanistan by Taliban insurgents. In a successful rescue effort by Navy SEAL Team Six, Senior Chief Special Warfare Operator Edward Byers distinguished himself by braving close-quarters enemy fire and, at one point, thrusting his own body across Dilip to shield him from the hail of bullets. Byers received the Medal of Honor in February.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2016 | By Wendy Rosenfield, FOR DO THIS
Consider Theatre Exile's production of Ayad Akhtar's The Invisible Hand alongside the current season of the podcast Serial . Both examine the conflicting narratives surrounding Americans held hostage by Muslim extremists in Pakistan. Serial focuses on real-life Bowe Bergdahl, a cog in the U.S. military machine who despised his superiors and their exploitation of Pakistani corruption and chaos, while Akhtar's fictive Nick Bright (played by Ian Merrill Peakes) is a Citibank employee, a cog in the U.S. financial machine who despises his superior, and whose company exploits weaknesses in the Pakistani economy.
NEWS
January 20, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Staff Writer
On Jan. 25, 1981, days after their long captivity in Iran ended, 52 former hostages and their families watched Super Bowl XV in the Thayer Hotel's wood-paneled Patton Tavern, where American flags were nearly as plentiful as the yellow ribbons at New Orleans' Superdome. If they diverted their eyes from the colorful Eagles-Raiders telecast, these newly minted heroes could look out the tavern's windows and see both the ice-crusted Hudson River and the U.S. Military Academy, whose castle-like structures were citadels of a freedom they had been denied for 444 days.
NEWS
December 26, 2015
Peggy Say, 74, who spent nearly seven years on a tireless quest for the release of her brother, journalist Terry Anderson, and his fellow hostages from kidnappers in Lebanon, died on Wednesday in in Cookeville, Tenn. Anderson, the chief Middle East correspondent for the Associated Press when he was abducted from the streets of Beirut in 1985 in the midst of the country's civil war, said his sister died after a long illness. A self-described housewife, Mrs. Say quickly became her brother's most prominent public champion, keeping his fate and that of the other hostages in Lebanon in the public eye as the years went by. "We were allowed a radio from time to time, and we did hear about her efforts and the efforts of other hostages' families on the radio, and of course it was always a great comfort," said Anderson, who was held by the pro-Iranian Shiite Muslim militant faction Islamic Jihad for 2,454 days.
NEWS
December 1, 2015
LAST WEEK, local government officials across the state decided they had had it with the long budget impasse in Harrisburg. The statewide organization of county commissioners said it was considering filing a law suit against the state for withholding needed state funding for local programs, especially for social services. Better yet, we like what the county commissioners in Bucks did. Rather than wait for a lawsuit to make its way through the courts, they decided to withhold local payments from taxes and fees due to the state and use them to pay for services to the poor, homeless, elderly, and those with mental and physical disabilities.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
The morning after Paul Jordan was expelled from a Montgomery County fire company, he returned to the firehouse. He pulled out a gun, ordered his former colleagues to sit on the floor in the basement, and fired a shot into the wall just inches from one firefighter's head, Mark Logan, president of the LaMott Fire Company, recalled. "He said, 'Some will leave. The others will leave in bags, including myself,' " Logan testified at a preliminary hearing Tuesday. Jordan, 25, of Philadelphia, wiped tears from his eyes as Logan recounted the March 31 hostage-taking.
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | By Jessica Parks and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former volunteer firefighter in Montgomery County held four fellow firefighters hostage at gunpoint Tuesday morning before being taken into custody, Cheltenham Township police said. Police Chief John Norris said Paul Jordan, 25, had been fired from the LaMott Fire Company in Elkins Park the day before. Jordan allegedly entered the unlocked fire station Tuesday morning with a 9mm handgun and held the other men hostage in the basement for about an hour before surrendering, police said.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Gloucester Township man told police he was held hostage during a home invasion Wednesday morning, causing a lockdown of nearby schools and a police K9 search for a suspects. Police responded about 10:55 a.m. to a home along York Terrace after a neighbor called 911 to report suspicious activity at the home. Police found two people inside and took them into custody. No weapons or drugs were found, but police said the incident was possibly drug-related. The man who said he was taken hostage was not injured, nor were the two suspects, police said.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
More than 3.7 million jobless Americans may be learning how it feels to fruitlessly search for work, find meals at a food pantry, and skip paying bills for the first time. Out of work for six months or more, they are the long-term unemployed, about two million of whom can't get extended unemployment benefits because House Speaker John Boehner won't post a bipartisan bill passed by the Senate. Federal unemployment funds traditionally kicked in once a worker exhausted his state benefits, typically after 26 weeks.
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