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Hostage Crisis

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NEWS
April 28, 1994 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The scene unfolds at Keibar International Airport. Keibar, a fictitious Middle Eastern country bearing an uncanny resemblance to Iran, has just hijacked a Western airliner. A group of American hostages has been led blindfolded to the airport's VIP lounge. Keibar's terrorist group has just issued an ultimatum to U.S. President Steve Sypherd, who in real life is a junior at Owen J. Roberts High School. Either release 10 Keibar terrorists being held by Needak, a neighboring fictitious country, or the American hostages will be executed.
NEWS
June 20, 1999 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, and Marc Schogol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
It began with a former employee shooting his way into a Norristown State Hospital administration building. It ended, almost exactly two days later, with him cowering amid the bodies of the two female nursing supervisors whom police said he had just shot. When it was over, one of the women was dead, the other was wounded, Denis P. Czajkowski, 40, of Collegeville, was facing murder charges, and authorities were facing questions about what they did and did not do during last week's 46-hour hostage standoff.
NEWS
April 18, 2005 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Iraqi forces, supported by U.S. troops, yesterday surrounded the central Iraqi town of Madain, where residents disputed widespread reports that scores of Shiite Muslims were held hostage by Sunni extremists. There were growing indications the incident had been grossly exaggerated. A spokesman for the Interior Ministry said the reports were false and were circulated to stir sectarian conflict. Also yesterday, the U.S. military yesterday reported the deaths of three soldiers in an attack late Saturday on a military base in Ramadi, west of the capital.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Dan Hardy, Special to The Inquirer
The Iran hostage crisis was not the result of a breakdown in U.S. intelligence gathering, according to the man who was the go-between for both governments when U.S. embassy personnel were held in Tehran for more than a year. "The hostage crisis had much more to do with internal politics in Iran than it did with the United States," said Mansour Farhang, an Iranian national who acted as a United Nations go-between in the negotiations to free the hostages. On Thursday, Farhang shared his view of the crisis, which lasted from Nov. 3, 1979 to Jan. 20, 1981, and of the 10 years since the Iranian revolution, with an audience at Swarthmore College.
NEWS
January 3, 2013
John Sheardown, 88, an unflappable Canadian diplomat in Tehran during the Iran hostage crisis who helped shelter six U.S. "house guests" until they were secretly shuttled out of the country, died Sunday at an Ottawa hospital. He had Alzheimer's disease, said his wife, Zena Sheardown. On Nov. 4, 1979, an Iranian mob seized the U.S. Embassy and took 52 Americans hostage in retaliation for Western support for the recently deposed shah. As was retold in the Ben Affleck film Argo , six Americans managed to evade the hostage-takers.
NEWS
August 9, 1991 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
It's time for some expert to climb out of his think tank and say the hostage crisis can now be resolved if only Israel is gracious enough to free Sheik Karim Obeid. Toss that expert back in his think tank forthwith. This happens every time a hostage is released by one of the many cells fronting for Hezbollah in Lebanon. The latest is British TV newsman John McCarthy, who was sent out bearing a sealed message for United Nations Secretary-General Javier Perez de Cuellar.
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | By Marc Schogol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Ridge will likely decide within the next two weeks whether the handling of the deadly Norristown State Hospital hostage crisis requires corrective action, Ridge's press secretary said yesterday. The governor directed the state police and the Department of Public Welfare, which administers the mental hospital, to report on the June 16-18 standoff, in which a troubled former employee killed one nursing supervisor and wounded another. But there will not be any "nicely bound reports," said Ridge spokesman Tim Reeves.
NEWS
January 20, 1996
Like the Vietnam War, the Russian quagmire in Chechnya seems likely to bring down a president. The leader who stands to follow in the sad footsteps of the late Lyndon Johnson is Russian President Boris Yeltsin. The bungled Russian military effort this week to rescue 100 Russian hostages seized by Chechen rebels may well lose Mr. Yeltsin his likely 1996 reelection bid, or drive him to drop out of the race, or even to cancel scheduled June elections. In any event, the latest Chechen disaster is a warning to America to start preparing for a post-Yeltsin Russia, in which Moscow-Washington relations are likely to sour.
NEWS
September 18, 2013
HOUSE Republican leaders are having trouble stopping their colleagues from shooting themselves in the foot - again. Having failed to approve any of the 12 annual appropriations bills that fund federal agencies, Congress has to pass a stop-gap spending bill by Sept. 30 to keep much of the federal government from shutting down. But rank-and-file Republicans in the House are resisting their leadership's proposed stop-gap because it wouldn't necessarily block funding for the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, a/k/a ObamaCare.
NEWS
November 4, 1988 | By JACK MCKINNEY
It seems some local television stations have been hearing from viewers who want to know when they're going to program something about those allegations that George Bush helped buy the 1980 presidential election by selling out to Iran. For those who've come in late on this one, it's been alleged that Bush flew to Paris in late October 1980 to guarantee secret arms shipments to the Iranians in exchange for their promise to hold the 52 American hostages in Tehran until it would be too late to salvage President Jimmy Carter's re- election bid. These charges have been circulating since the summer of 1987.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The hostage crisis at the Lindt Chocolat Cafe in Sydney, Australia, unfolded in a way impossible a decade ago. Much of it played out on Facebook and text messaging (already there as of 2004), and on YouTube, Twitter, and other social media as yet unborn in 2004. To be a hostage-taker or hostage as of 2014, it seems, you need good social-media skills. "There's an unprecedented degree of immediacy to such crises now," says Lawrence Husick, senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute and codirector for the Center for the Study of Terrorism.
NEWS
April 8, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
USED TO BE that when Philly criminals heard that police were looking for them, they went looking for Chuck Stone. They'd find him in the ivory tower at Broad and Callowhill - a trustworthy Daily News scribe who would facilitate their surrender to a Police Department they felt they couldn't trust. Men accused of murder, assault, shootings and burglaries called Stone at all hours of the night, asking for his help. Some wanted to clear their names. Most, of course, were guilty.
NEWS
September 18, 2013
HOUSE Republican leaders are having trouble stopping their colleagues from shooting themselves in the foot - again. Having failed to approve any of the 12 annual appropriations bills that fund federal agencies, Congress has to pass a stop-gap spending bill by Sept. 30 to keep much of the federal government from shutting down. But rank-and-file Republicans in the House are resisting their leadership's proposed stop-gap because it wouldn't necessarily block funding for the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, a/k/a ObamaCare.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Michael Birnbaum and Anthony Faiola, Washington Post
An attack on a remote natural-gas complex in the Sahara desert was conducted by an international band of Islamist militants, apparently including two Canadians, who wore Algerian army uniforms and had help from the inside, Algeria's prime minister said Monday, in his government's first official accounting of the bloody four-day siege. Three Americans died in the violence and seven U.S. citizens survived, the State Department said Monday. The Algerian government captured three of the militants alive, Prime Minister Abdelmalek Sellal told reporters in Algiers, in remarks carried by the state-run news agency.
NEWS
January 3, 2013
John Sheardown, 88, an unflappable Canadian diplomat in Tehran during the Iran hostage crisis who helped shelter six U.S. "house guests" until they were secretly shuttled out of the country, died Sunday at an Ottawa hospital. He had Alzheimer's disease, said his wife, Zena Sheardown. On Nov. 4, 1979, an Iranian mob seized the U.S. Embassy and took 52 Americans hostage in retaliation for Western support for the recently deposed shah. As was retold in the Ben Affleck film Argo , six Americans managed to evade the hostage-takers.
NEWS
April 18, 2012
NEW YORK - Retired Associated Press feature writer Sid Moody, 83, who chronicled major events of the 20th century from the assassination of John F. Kennedy to the Iranian hostage crisis, has died. Moody's son Clarke Moody said Tuesday that his father died Sunday at a hospital in Morristown, N.J. A longtime resident of Bernardsville, N.J., Moody spent his last years at a retirement community in Bernards Township, N.J. During his almost four decades at the AP, Moody covered such events as the Warren Commission report on Kennedy's assassination, the trial of Lee Harvey Oswald's murderer Jack Ruby, the Detroit race riots, the My Lai massacre, North Korea's capture of the spy ship USS Pueblo, the kidnapping of a bus full of school children in Chowchilla, Calif.
NEWS
September 21, 2010
Hostage debacle targets officials MANILA, Philippines - President Benigno Aquino 3d said Monday that Manila's mayor, a recently retired police chief, and journalists were among a dozen people who could be charged over last month's disastrous hostage standoff that killed eight Hong Kong tourists on a bus and damaged ties with China. The recommended charges were part of a government investigation report on the Aug. 23 hostage crisis that has been handed over to the Chinese ambassador.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Among the many mysteries of All About Steve (mystery #1: Why?) is the rationale behind its insufferably kooky protagonist's choice of footwear: the same pair of cherry red go-go boots, every day, every night. A crossword puzzle constructor for a Sacramento newspaper, Mary Horowitz - played with alarming pep by Sandra Bullock - trots around town beaming proprietarily as she spies this person and that, on the bus or in a park, laboring over her crosswords. And everywhere she goes, she's in those boots.
NEWS
October 16, 2005 | By Keith Herbert INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Relatives of former U.S. hostage and Norristown native Joseph Cicippio, who said they "put their lives on hold" to seek his release, have won a $91 million judgment for emotional distress against the Islamic Republic of Iran. A federal judge in U.S. District Court in Washington issued an order Oct. 7 that 14 Cicippio relatives or their estates will receive $6.5 million each, court records state. "The Cicippio family is very appreciative of the award," said Thomas Cicippio, 82, of Norristown, Joseph Cicippio's brother and a family spokesman during the hostage crisis.
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