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Hot Potato

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NEWS
February 17, 1989 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
A state trooper admitted in court yesterday that he had lied about evidence in the 1986 murder trial of former Upper Merion High School Principal Jay C. Smith, and another trooper refused to testify about whether the prosecution had improperly withheld information. Trooper Victor Dove, who was responsible for overseeing evidence against Smith, said he told the investigators that he discovered the evidence after - rather than before - Smith was convicted of killing teacher Susan Reinert and her two children.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | By Doreen Carvajal, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Call it City Council's new win, win, win strategy. Yesterday, in an unprecedented act of political unity that stunned even the political veterans, Council members voted to support three conflicting bills dealing with the lingering and controversial issue of item pricing. That means Council passed a law demanding price labels on all supermarket merchandise in the city of Philadelphia. And it supported a bill that didn't. And it also approved a bill threatening to do it. The result is an old-fashioned game of hot potato, heaving a boiling one to Mayor Rendell, who will have to make the final selection and endure the political pressures from senior citizen groups and the supermarket industry.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It should come as no surprise that President Clinton has opted to neither embrace nor condemn the so-called "global tobacco settlement. " It should shock nobody that the master of the bully pulpit has decided to speak softly, play for time, and hope that Capitol Hill takes the lead. Because, in political terms, this historic megabuck megadeal is everything he dreads. It's a hot potato that could burn a lot of powerful people, no matter what happens. It's a massive, divisive issue with no clear political payoff.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Hot potato, hot potato. Hot potato, hot potato. Hot potato, hot potato. Potato, potato, potato, potato. " Murray Cook of the kiddie music group the Wiggles estimates that he has sung those words at least 6,000 times. But the simple tune never gets old for him. "It's because of the audience," he says. "For the children, it's new. " Cook and his fellow performers - Jeff Fatt, Anthony Field, and Greg Page - have been loved by children worldwide during their 21-year stint wearing brightly colored shirts and crooning about dinosaurs and pirates.
NEWS
March 30, 1994 | Daily News wire services
JERUSALEM ISRAEL SETS CURFEW ON 250,000 ARABS Israel, anxious to avoid renewed violence as it talked peace with the PLO in Cairo, clamped curfews on more than a quarter million Arabs in the occupied lands today, the army said. Military sources said the curfews were in response to plans by Palestinians to dedicate their annual Land Day observance to the victims of last month's massacre 0f 30 praying Arabs by a Jew in Hebron and Monday's killings by undercover troops of six PLO men in Gaza.
NEWS
November 21, 1992 | by Paul Maryniak, Daily News Staff Writer
The dozen children's advocates who had gathered yesterday to condemn state senators wore a collective expression of disgust and frustration. Just as Pennsylvania seemed poised to take one small step toward providing health-care coverage for some of the estimated 400,000 children in the state who are currently uninsured, politics threatens to scuttle the dream. Because of an ongoing fight with the Casey administration over workers' compensation reform and other issues, the Republican-dominated Senate recessed earlier this week without voting on a bill to insure about 35,000 children under the age of 12. Unless the Senate returns and passes the measure before its session ends Nov. 30, the bill will die. "It's not their children who are going to lose their hearing or won't get immunized," said Shelley Yanoff, director of Philadelphia Citizens for Children and Youth and a member of a broad-based coalition called the Children's Health Campaign.
NEWS
March 9, 1995 | BY DOUG LEAMAN
Through the passage of time, a spark of glory and renown are on the wane. President Clinton's spellbound hold on the body politic is slipping away. From hereafter, that crackling voice, that babyface smile and gestures of leadership will be acknowledged halfheartedly. The bittersweet encounters with the world at large is leading up to the crucifixion. It takes a mighty powerful personality to lead a nation so entrenched in global supervision and homeland renaissance. It takes an assortment of characteristics, wrapped up in a single dome, to remain in the seat of governance.
FOOD
June 30, 1993 | By Marcia Cone and Thelma Snyder, FOR THE INQUIRER
When it comes to microwave cooking, people often misjudge the "doneness" of the food because they haven't factored in the standing time, or the time that the food continues to cook without any microwave energy. Here's a tip: Slightly undercook a food to bring it to the right doneness at the table. People probably notice standing time the most when cooking a potato. To test a potato for doneness in a conventional oven, you should be able to pierce it with a fork. But judging doneness from a microwave oven is different.
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Marcia Gelbart, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Only one thing will stop the Florida House from voting today to appoint a slate of electors committed to Republican George W. Bush: a direct order from the U.S. Supreme Court. "It would have to be fairly specific," House Speaker Tom Feeney said yesterday, shortly after committees of the Republican-dominated House and Senate approved legislation naming the new presidential electors. The daylong hearings proceeded as the nation's top court heard arguments on the legality of a hand recount in Florida, a case that could decide who is the next president.
NEWS
March 11, 1986
Unsettling thoughts after Mayor Goode's "from the heart" talk to the city and his "No more MOVEs" press conference: Will a new bureaucratic flow chart produce what was missing the first time around - good judgment and common sense decisions? Will City Hall absorb itself in "crisis management" manuals, forgetting that several ounces of prevention might have defused MOVE long before it got out of control? Has straight talk forever fled Philadelphia? To the MOVE commission's urging to get cracking on an emergency plan, Mayor Goode has convened an "executive management group" to review the recommendation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Anne D'Innocenzio, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Paula Deen lost another chunk of her empire on Wednesday. Wal-Mart Stores Inc. announced it had ended its relationship with the Southern celebrity cook, part of the continuing fallout in the wake of revelations that she used racial slurs in the past. The world's largest retailer, based in Bentonville, Ark., has been carrying a variety of products from grocery items to health and wellness products under Deen's moniker since 2011. "We will not place new orders beyond those already committed," said Dave Tovar, a Wal-Mart spokesman.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Hot potato, hot potato. Hot potato, hot potato. Hot potato, hot potato. Potato, potato, potato, potato. " Murray Cook of the kiddie music group the Wiggles estimates that he has sung those words at least 6,000 times. But the simple tune never gets old for him. "It's because of the audience," he says. "For the children, it's new. " Cook and his fellow performers - Jeff Fatt, Anthony Field, and Greg Page - have been loved by children worldwide during their 21-year stint wearing brightly colored shirts and crooning about dinosaurs and pirates.
NEWS
January 6, 2012
COUNCILWOMAN Marian Tasco is unhappy about the press attention - mostly Daily News scorn and ridicule - to her immoral Powerball pension bonus. Poor baby. She snatched a $478,057 pot o' gold, which she wouldn't have gotten if decency prevailed, and she's the injured party? She got the money under the ill-designed Deferred Retirement Option Plan, the despised DROP, which was not intended for elected officials but which morphed into an entitlement for them. The idea of DROP for elected officials stinks like week-old calamari, but some Council cretins, including Tasco, made it worse by snaking through a loophole that allowed them to retire - despite an "irrevocable commitment" to leave - and return to work anyway.
NEWS
July 22, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: Is it ever OK to tell a teen that if his parent(s) had a say, he would have been aborted? How about if a teen thinks his deceased parent (three years ago) was wonderful and his mother is the enemy, whereas the truth is the father wanted to abort the child when he found out about the pregnancy? I know of at least three people who were told their parents would have had an abortion if it had been legal/the mother wanted to put her head in the oven when she found out she was pregnant/the child was conceived while on birth control and wasn't wanted.
SPORTS
August 15, 2006 | By Craig Donnelly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two summers ago, Gary Birzer was aboard Lil Bit of Rouge in an otherwise forgettable race at Mountaineer Park in Chester, W.Va., when the filly broke down and fell, sending the 27-year-old jockey crashing to the ground. Birzer was paralyzed from the waist down because of injuries to his neck, back and spinal cord. What he did not know was that he was not covered by a catastrophic-injury insurance policy and that his debacle would be the catalyst that has spurred hundreds of other jockeys to seek adequate protection.
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Marcia Gelbart, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Only one thing will stop the Florida House from voting today to appoint a slate of electors committed to Republican George W. Bush: a direct order from the U.S. Supreme Court. "It would have to be fairly specific," House Speaker Tom Feeney said yesterday, shortly after committees of the Republican-dominated House and Senate approved legislation naming the new presidential electors. The daylong hearings proceeded as the nation's top court heard arguments on the legality of a hand recount in Florida, a case that could decide who is the next president.
LIVING
March 3, 1999 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Remember the Big Talk? It was uncomfortable. Mom or Dad sheepishly delivered the lecture at puberty. It covered the birds and the bees. And then, thankfully, it was over. If parents talked at all. Now, the Big Talk often is a series of little talks that must cover more and tougher ground. They must delve into sex, of course, but also AIDS, violence, drug and alcohol use - even, as the tragedy involving the deaths of five Penncrest High School students suggests, the huffing of common household products.
NEWS
July 28, 1998 | by Maureen Tkacik, Daily News Staff Writer
Caddie - short for Cadillac - earns part of his living as a "doctor," which at 9th and Indiana means a "patient" will pay him a few dollars to inject him with heroin, usually in the groin but on occasion in the leg, arm or neck. Caddie, who has injected his own groin with the drug so many times that he is on crutches because of the abcesses on his leg, is needed in this corner of Fairhill. His patients don't have any veins left, and he's their conduit to a quick escape from the world of gaunt misery.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It should come as no surprise that President Clinton has opted to neither embrace nor condemn the so-called "global tobacco settlement. " It should shock nobody that the master of the bully pulpit has decided to speak softly, play for time, and hope that Capitol Hill takes the lead. Because, in political terms, this historic megabuck megadeal is everything he dreads. It's a hot potato that could burn a lot of powerful people, no matter what happens. It's a massive, divisive issue with no clear political payoff.
NEWS
November 16, 1995 | by Paul Maryniak, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Joseph R. Daughen contributed to this report
Philadelphia Common Pleas judges are to decide today whether to take U.S. Judge Norma Shapiro off the firing line - and put themselves in the bull's-eye instead. Now that the prison cap is ending, the judges must approve guidelines for releasing inmates if and when the jails get overcrowded. That prospect has some judges terrified, sources said. They fear becoming targets of public criticism, just as Shapiro has been since the Goode administration and lawyers for inmates agreed to the cap in 1986.
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