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Hot Sauce

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FOOD
August 14, 2015 | Samantha Melamed
Local hot sauce goes national Yong Chi, owner of Giwa, the Korean fast-casual favorite, is going national with his Yong's Korean Hot Sauce, a variation on the traditional bibimbap topper, made with red pepper, sesame oil, vinegar, and tamari. "A lot of hot sauce only brings heat. This is tangy, spicy and sweet. 'Deliciously Spicy' is our tagline," he said. It is selling at Whole Foods across the Mid-Atlantic and in more than 100 Kroger stores, and there are plans to roll out a Korean barbecue sauce in September.
NEWS
February 20, 2015
L ALIT KALANI, 31, of Bella Vista, co-founded Bandar Foods, which premiered its Indian hot sauces on Kickstarter in 2012. The sauces, sold at Whole Foods and other retailers, are inspired by Indian condiment flavors like spicy mango and mint cilantro. Kalani oversees production, while co-founder Dan Garblik, 32, of San Francisco, heads marketing. I spoke with Kalani. Q: How'd you and Dan come up with the idea? A: We were MBA classmates at Wharton. Dan went to an Indian restaurant here and asked for hot sauce and got Tabasco.
NEWS
June 20, 1999 | By Oshrat Carmiel, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Like most customers who walk into the Suzie Hot Sauce shop, David Karasik knew what he wanted. Sort of. Something smoky that stings of vinegar. Preferably green. He issued the challenge to Debbie Tusman, the face most often behind the counter of hot-sauce samples that are dispensed like medicine. Tusman scanned the inventory in her head and came up with three options. After selling him on two light sauces, Tusman, 25, got serious. She turned the air conditioner up a notch and measured out a tiny teaspoon of a peppery elixir known as Molten Lava.
NEWS
November 8, 1993 | By CALVIN TRILLIN
I wasn't surprised to hear that the hot sauce that people in Louisiana eat on raw oysters is effective in killing a wicked bacterium called vibrio vulnificus. As my Uncle Harry often says, it stands to reason. It stands to reason because when you eat that hot sauce you know something is going on. This is a different experience from eating, say, a bowl of cereal or a cheese sandwich or an apple. You can feel Louisiana hot sauce begin its work. You're aware that a process is taking place.
NEWS
October 1, 2010
The city has recently been engaged in a National Conversation on Race, otherwise known as "Who's black enough?" It's not easy: Black is not a color. It's a state of mind. That's why Tom Jones is blacker than Clarence Thomas. It's why Mario Von Peebles is just as black as Jesse Jackson. It's why we hailed Bill Clinton as the first black president, and laughed those corny parts right off Vanilla Ice's head. Blackness is not in the way you walk, either. You can stroll like Rollo from "Sanford and Son" and still not be black enough.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEA ISLE CITY - Any hot sauce you can find in a surf shop lined up in rows like the next artisan sunscreen or surf wax maybe means its creators have got something figured out. For the Jersey Shore guys behind Hank Sauce, which has taken the red-hot red-hot-sauce market by storm in the last few years, having their friends at Heritage Surf sell their sauce was a no-brainer. So was opening up a restaurant on Landis Avenue in the south end of Sea Isle, at 86th Street. Brian "Hank" Ruxton, after all, was an accomplished and creative chef who started out making the sauce for his friends at Flagler College in St. Augustine, Fla. When Matt Pittaluga, now 28, decided to create a logo and bottle design for a college project, the business model seemed to coalesce like a well-formed set of waves.
NEWS
January 11, 2013
What to eat: Halal (food that meets Islamic dietary laws) chicken, lamb, falafel or tilapia platters with rice, lettuce, tomato and onion are $5 - soda or water included! Sizable portions, too. Sandwiches and a drink are $4. Go with the creamy white sauce or the hot sauce, or both. Eat for less after you "dress for less" at the Ross store nearby. Don't miss: Halal chicken platters are popular for a reason: They're consistently good. Tender - not greasy or fatty - morsels of chicken with a shot of hot sauce make the perfect quick lunch.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2003 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
Who says we all can't get along? Not the worldly folks at the Abbaye, the latest Northern Liberties restaurant at 3rd Street and Fairmount Avenue. Specializing in Belgian beers, this place makes the classic New Orleans sandwich with Pacific coast oysters dredged in Japanese breadcrumbs and served on Italian bread. Chef Tom Lax tops it off with a Vietnamese hot sauce that he calls "the kickin' chicken" because of the bird on the bottle. OYSTER PO-BOY FROM THE ABBAYE For the mayonnaise: 1 quart mayonnaise 1 small bunch chives 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 cloves garlic, minced fine 1 teaspoon white pepper 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper 6 eggs 1 tablespoon dried oregano 1 tablespoon cayenne 1 tablespoon dried thyme Dash salt and pepper For the sandwich: 15 medium-sized Pacific oysters 5 cups flour Panko (rice)
FOOD
May 1, 2002 | By LAUREN MCCUTCHEON For the Daily News
For 14 years, Maccabeam restaurant at 128 S. 12th St. has been an oasis of glatt kosher cuisine. On any given weekday, customers, many wearing traditional yarmulkes, crowd the small eatery between Walnut and Sansom streets to share platters of barbecued turkey shawarma, creamy hummus, char-broiled kebobs, and the "Maccabeam special": eggplant layered with fried onions, chickpeas and tomatoes. The restaurant is open for lunch and dinner only (closed for Shabbat, the sabbath, from 3 p.m. Friday through Saturday)
NEWS
May 24, 2012
1 dozen eggs 6 tablespoons mayonnaise 1 teaspoon dry mustard 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1/4 cup sweet pickle relish 5 strips of cooked bacon, crumbled 1/2 teaspoon hot sauce   1. Place the eggs in a pot of water. Bring water to a boil and then turn off heat. Let the eggs rest in the water for 15 minutes. 2. Peel the eggs and cut in half vertically. Remove the yolks and place in a bowl.
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FOOD
August 14, 2015 | Samantha Melamed
Local hot sauce goes national Yong Chi, owner of Giwa, the Korean fast-casual favorite, is going national with his Yong's Korean Hot Sauce, a variation on the traditional bibimbap topper, made with red pepper, sesame oil, vinegar, and tamari. "A lot of hot sauce only brings heat. This is tangy, spicy and sweet. 'Deliciously Spicy' is our tagline," he said. It is selling at Whole Foods across the Mid-Atlantic and in more than 100 Kroger stores, and there are plans to roll out a Korean barbecue sauce in September.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEA ISLE CITY - Any hot sauce you can find in a surf shop lined up in rows like the next artisan sunscreen or surf wax maybe means its creators have got something figured out. For the Jersey Shore guys behind Hank Sauce, which has taken the red-hot red-hot-sauce market by storm in the last few years, having their friends at Heritage Surf sell their sauce was a no-brainer. So was opening up a restaurant on Landis Avenue in the south end of Sea Isle, at 86th Street. Brian "Hank" Ruxton, after all, was an accomplished and creative chef who started out making the sauce for his friends at Flagler College in St. Augustine, Fla. When Matt Pittaluga, now 28, decided to create a logo and bottle design for a college project, the business model seemed to coalesce like a well-formed set of waves.
NEWS
February 20, 2015
L ALIT KALANI, 31, of Bella Vista, co-founded Bandar Foods, which premiered its Indian hot sauces on Kickstarter in 2012. The sauces, sold at Whole Foods and other retailers, are inspired by Indian condiment flavors like spicy mango and mint cilantro. Kalani oversees production, while co-founder Dan Garblik, 32, of San Francisco, heads marketing. I spoke with Kalani. Q: How'd you and Dan come up with the idea? A: We were MBA classmates at Wharton. Dan went to an Indian restaurant here and asked for hot sauce and got Tabasco.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015
The truck: Our mouths started watering as soon as we saw Ricardo Barbosa's Casa Brazil on 33rd Street, on Drexel University's campus. The truck, which opened in June, features a photo of juicy meat over an open flame - basically the only two things you need in life, when you really think about it.   Concept: Culinary creativity is great, but there's something to be said for simple dishes done right. That's what drew us to Casa Brazil - the sirloin steak, lightly seasoned and cooked to perfection.
TRAVEL
February 11, 2013 | By Tracey Teo, ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION
APALACHICOLA, Fla. - For oyster lovers, Apalachicola is Florida's pearl. There are many reasons to visit Franklin County, the collection of tiny Panhandle communities often called the "forgotten coast" because of its non-touristy, Old Florida vibe - the uncrowded, pet-friendly beaches on St. George Island, the St. James Bay Golf Resort in Carrabelle, charter fishing in Alligator Point, and bird-watching in Eastpoint. For many people, though, there's nothing as satisfying as Apalachicola's world-famous oysters.
NEWS
January 11, 2013
What to eat: Halal (food that meets Islamic dietary laws) chicken, lamb, falafel or tilapia platters with rice, lettuce, tomato and onion are $5 - soda or water included! Sizable portions, too. Sandwiches and a drink are $4. Go with the creamy white sauce or the hot sauce, or both. Eat for less after you "dress for less" at the Ross store nearby. Don't miss: Halal chicken platters are popular for a reason: They're consistently good. Tender - not greasy or fatty - morsels of chicken with a shot of hot sauce make the perfect quick lunch.
FOOD
January 3, 2013 | By J.M. Hirsch, Associated Press
Sometimes failure can end up tasting pretty good. It certainly was the case with these meatballs. I'd been aiming to create a solidly delicious, all-purpose meatball suitable for tossing with marinara over spaghetti. Except it didn't quite work out that way. The meatballs, while certainly delicious, were both too tangy and too sweet to pair with your basic pasta sauce. And they certainly didn't agree with the mandatory Parmesan that spaghetti calls for. So I tried them in a curry sauce.
SPORTS
July 12, 2012 | BY TOM MAHON and Daily News Staff Writer
LOOKS LIKE new Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning is putting down roots. TMZ reported that Manning, who signed with Denver in March after being released by the Colts, purchased a 16,000 square foot mansion in a suburb of the Mile High City. The home, which has seven bedrooms, nine bathrooms, an elevator, and a seven-car garage, cost a little over $4.5 million. A pittance to Manning who signed a 5-year deal worth $96 million. Diss Bud for Rays Before attending Tuesday's All-Star game, baseball commissioner Bud Selig took a shot at the Tampa Bay Rays' low attendance total for the season.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2012
Rhubarb Barbecue Sauce   3 pounds rhubarb (about 9 cups), trimmed and cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 medium red onion, diced (about 3/4 cup) 2 cups raisins, chopped 1 medium orange habanero pepper, seeded and minced (reserve seeds to adjust heat at the end) 2 cups brown sugar 3/4 cup honey 3/4 cup cider vinegar 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon allspice 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1 teaspoon sea salt   If canning, prepare canner, jars and lids.
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