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Hotel Managers

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BUSINESS
January 30, 1993 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Hotel Atop the Bellevue is ending its affiliation with the Cunard steamship line, but its present management will continue to run the 170-room luxury inn, owner Richard I. Rubin & Co. said yesterday. Cunard opened the fully renovated hotel April 1, 1989, at a time when the shipping and cruise line planned to expand into land-based hospitality. It signed a 10-year lease for the hotel, which occupies the top seven floors of the landmark Bellevue building on South Broad Street in Center City.
LIVING
October 20, 1993 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From Wilmington to Valley Forge to Trenton, an empty hotel room is as rare in the Philadelphia region this morning as a happy Atlanta Braves fan. With the Phillies in the World Series, plus, coincidentally, numerous large and mid-size trade shows and other business conferences in town, the area's hoteliers are a happy lot. "There are 18,000 rooms in the region and they're all gone," said Thomas O. Muldoon, Philadelphia Convention and Visitors...
BUSINESS
November 11, 1995 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The issue was just too sensitive for some of Philadelphia's tourism promoters, who were trying hard this week to present the city's best side to visiting travel agents. So - at the behest of the city's top tourism official - some hotel managers decided not to distribute Philadelphia magazine's November issue, with a cover story on the unsteady state of city race relations, to guests. But a spokesman for the travel agents who gathered at the Convention Center this week thinks worry about the magazine was overblown.
SPORTS
November 11, 1998 | By Christopher K. Hepp, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city's hotel owners have been informed by the NBA that the league will not need as much space for conferences and meetings as it booked for the Feb. 14 All-Star Game weekend. The announcement was not unexpected. Of more concern to hoteliers is whether the NBA's unresolved labor dispute will lead to cancellation of the game itself, which is scheduled at the First Union Center. J. Mickey Rowley, executive director of the Greater Philadelphia Hotel Association, said it was typical of any large event planned years in advance to book more meeting and conference space than needed, and then to give some back before the event.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2006 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With no fanfare and little public notice, dozens of Philadelphia-area hotels have banned smoking in recent months in all or most of their guest rooms, lobbies, and other public spaces. The response from hotel guests and employees has been largely positive, hotel managers say. "I've heard from two customers who don't like it," said Bill Walsh, general manager of the 1,400-room Philadelphia Marriott, the city's largest hotel. Hotels are warning guests that, if they do light up in a no-smoking room, a stiff fine - as much as $500 - may be added to their bills.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The main problem keeping more big shows from the Pennsylvania Convention Center is that too many customers don't feel they are getting value for all they pay under its current labor arrangements, consultant Public Financial Management Inc. (PFM) wrote in a recent report to the center's board, echoing earlier reports. If labor is the issue, why is the center's board recruiting private firms to replace its management? PFM credits the managers for bringing in more money and spending less than the center's budget.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | By Karen McAllister, Special to The Inquirer
Normally they work in a hotel room alone. But on Friday, 13 housekeepers from Valley Forge-area hotels made beds while timers were ticking, an audience was cheering and clipboard-toting judges were ready to move in. Families, hotel managers and other contestants turned the atrium floors of the Guest Quarters Suite Hotel-Valley Forge into a pep rally. In the lobby, where four beds were set up, chants of "Go number five," "Turn over the blanket, the tag's showing," and "Faster, faster" filled the room.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2000 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the fall of 1994, more than 10,000 people thronged state unemployment offices seeking 500 jobs at the soon-to-open Philadelphia Marriott Hotel. Today, the hat is in the other hand. With unemployment low and dozens of hotels opening across the region, hotel managers are renting fancy conference rooms and wearing wacky costumes in a frenzied search for staff, those in the business say. One of the more ambitious efforts to find employees starts this morning and runs throughout the week at the Convention Center, where the Loews Philadelphia Hotel is staging what it calls the Job Link Trade Show.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2000 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A building binge will give Center City almost 50 percent more hotel rooms by 2002 than were available last year, but hotel occupancy rates will plunge and stay depressed for three or four years, according to a study of the local lodging market released yesterday. Despite the pain that some hotels may feel until about 2004 from the drop in occupancy, the study found that demand for hotel rooms is likely to rise steadily over the next seven years, fueled especially by growing numbers of tourists and conventioneers coming to town.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | By Tom Belden and Jane M. von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Philadelphia hotels and restaurants gave thanks yesterday for Valentine's Day, George Washington, jazz, and the drug industry. But the city's tax collectors and the purveyors of athletic shoes were singing a much sadder song while tallying the cost as professional basketball's premier marketing event slipped out of Philadelphia's grasp. The region's hotel and restaurant operators saw millions of dollars in revenue disappear when the NBA yesterday canceled its All-Star Game and a host of related events scheduled for the First Union Center in mid-February.
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BUSINESS
April 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The main problem keeping more big shows from the Pennsylvania Convention Center is that too many customers don't feel they are getting value for all they pay under its current labor arrangements, consultant Public Financial Management Inc. (PFM) wrote in a recent report to the center's board, echoing earlier reports. If labor is the issue, why is the center's board recruiting private firms to replace its management? PFM credits the managers for bringing in more money and spending less than the center's budget.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The majority of Center City hotel operators have told the Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority that unless things change drastically on the labor front at the bigger Convention Center, the city will lose major group business. In a letter dated May 22 and obtained by The Inquirer, the Greater Philadelphia Hotel Association criticized the slow booking pace for group business despite the 15-month-old, $786 million expansion that nearly doubled the size of the Convention Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2012
In a disturbing announcement sure to destroy her fans, Kendra Wilkinson has claimed she is devoid of talent. Kendra, 26, who admirably performed a typical job this weekend — acting as host at MGM Grand's Wet Republic pool party — tells People she is aware such appearances don't exactly demand her to deliver Meryl Streep-level work. Instead, the Playboy alumna spends those gigs mocking her exalted place as a celeb. "I never ever see myself as a celebrity or famous, so I poke fun at that," Kendra says.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2006 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With no fanfare and little public notice, dozens of Philadelphia-area hotels have banned smoking in recent months in all or most of their guest rooms, lobbies, and other public spaces. The response from hotel guests and employees has been largely positive, hotel managers say. "I've heard from two customers who don't like it," said Bill Walsh, general manager of the 1,400-room Philadelphia Marriott, the city's largest hotel. Hotels are warning guests that, if they do light up in a no-smoking room, a stiff fine - as much as $500 - may be added to their bills.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2005 | By JEFF MAN For the Daily News
According to the United Nations, approximately 800,000 people were killed during the genocide in Rwanda in 1994. But Paul Rusesabagina believes that number is close to (maybe more than) 1 million. For a hundred days, members of the Tutsi, the ethnic minority in Rwanda, met their fates at the hands of machete-armed Hutus, the ethnic majority, in one of the most gruesome killing campaigns since Hitler's Holocaust. Today, slightly more than 1,200 Rwandans live because of Rusesabagina's efforts, captured in the new film from director Terry George, "Hotel Rwanda.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2000 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A building binge will give Center City almost 50 percent more hotel rooms by 2002 than were available last year, but hotel occupancy rates will plunge and stay depressed for three or four years, according to a study of the local lodging market released yesterday. Despite the pain that some hotels may feel until about 2004 from the drop in occupancy, the study found that demand for hotel rooms is likely to rise steadily over the next seven years, fueled especially by growing numbers of tourists and conventioneers coming to town.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2000 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the fall of 1994, more than 10,000 people thronged state unemployment offices seeking 500 jobs at the soon-to-open Philadelphia Marriott Hotel. Today, the hat is in the other hand. With unemployment low and dozens of hotels opening across the region, hotel managers are renting fancy conference rooms and wearing wacky costumes in a frenzied search for staff, those in the business say. One of the more ambitious efforts to find employees starts this morning and runs throughout the week at the Convention Center, where the Loews Philadelphia Hotel is staging what it calls the Job Link Trade Show.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1999 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
People who have waited until the last hour to find a Philadelphia hotel room on New Year's Eve, hoping to get a big discount from innkeepers eager to rent empty rooms, may be in for a shock. Hotel managers in Center City and other locations across the region said yesterday that they already have sold all or most of their rooms for the weekend, with demand coming from revelers welcoming 2000 and those who need to stay near their businesses in case of Y2K-related computer glitches.
NEWS
July 19, 1999 | By Michael Stoll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As Philadelphia hotels scramble to build rooms for conventioneers, from the Republican Party to the American Federation of Teachers, northern Delaware is in the midst of a building boom of its own. By fall, four new hotels will be open and a fifth will have expanded in northern New Castle County, increasing the area's capacity by 600 rooms - more than 30 percent. Hoteliers expect business to slump in the short term as supply exceeds demand, though they say corporate travelers will quickly close the gap. "In the early '90s, the demand for hotel growth was just insane," said Christian Coffin, general manager of the Wilmington Doubletree, which is nearing completion of a 90-room expansion and an indoor pool on Route 202 just south of Route 92. "Everyone has dollar signs in their eyes and everybody builds," Coffin said.
NEWS
July 12, 1999 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The 137-room Hampton Inn & Suites Hotel, just off Interstate 95 at the Newtown bypass next to the Lower Makefield Corporate Center, opened last week. "We're targeting the Newtown area first, and then West Trenton and the southern Princeton areas," said Joanne Andrews, director of sales for the new hotel. The Newtown exit is the next to the last one before northbound I-95 crosses into New Jersey from Pennsylvania, making the site close enough to compete with the relatively few hotel rooms just across the river, she said.
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