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NEWS
November 30, 1987 | By SCOTT HEIMER, Daily News Staff Writer
Drivers, beware of the Schuylkill Expressway Construction Monster - he'll be here again in two months. That was the word from Pennsylvania Department of Transportation officials today in announcing the 1988 construction season on the superhighway, which will begin Feb. 1. The impacted area is the stretch of expressway between Roosevelt Boulevard and University Avenue. Six separate bottlenecks - areas of extreme congestion - are anticipated during rush hours, according to PennDOT spokeswoman Lois Morasco.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | By Kay Raftery INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"Be a good listener" is the rule for volunteers with the Victim Services Center of Montgomery County. "Callers just need an ear, someone who just lets them talk," said Diane Budman of Jenkintown, a volunteer who staffs the hotline for the agency. During regular business hours, staffers handle calls that come in from victims of crimes such as sexual assault and robbery. Domestic-abuse calls are referred to other agencies. On nights and weekends, an answering service receives the calls and patches them through to the home phones or cell phones of volunteers.
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | By Pamela Stock, Special to The Inquirer
On the one hand, the volunteers at Abington Memorial Hospital's Tel-E-Help hotline are sad that they aren't answering the phones there anymore. On the other hand, many of them have been attending seminars and training sessions and will be answering the calls to Abington's new hotline, Elderhelp, at 657-3344 instead. Elderhelp, which will begin this month, will operate from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and will answer questions from a growing population of older adults and from their care-givers - who are frequently their adult children, themselves aging.
NEWS
March 24, 1996 | By Russell Gold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Calls to a new 24-hour hotline for the homeless in Bucks County are creating a portrait that confirms there's a rootless population much larger than local agencies can accommodate. In two weeks earlier this month, the hotline got 40 calls from people needing shelter either immediately or in the near future, said Kathy White, director of the American Red Cross Homeless Shelter in Levittown, where the hotline is based. There is space in four local shelters for about 135 homeless people on any given night.
NEWS
March 5, 1986 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
A special domestic-violence hotline linking Fort Dix with the Providence House-Willingboro Shelter has been disconnected because of poor response during a six-month pilot project. The goal of the $23,883 project was to better serve women living at the Army post by increasing their awareness of the shelter and the options available to them if they were being abused at home. The post's interest in the hotline came not because officials feared increasing domestic violence among its families, said Maj. Bill Grove, but because of awareness that the problem exists in all sectors of society and that the demands of military life can worsen family tensions.
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | By Robert J. Terry and Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writers
City police detectives said they received about 30 calls yesterday and Tuesday on a hotline for people with information about a man believed responsible for a series of assaults on women in Center City. Police spokesman Richard DeLise said investigators were pleased with the results and were checking each report. The hotline was set up Tuesday after police received at least 100 calls from anxious residents who said they saw a man fitting the suspect's description. Teams of plainclothes detectives yesterday concentrated on an area from the Schuylkill to the Delaware River and from Spring Garden to South Streets.
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | By Alicia A. Caldwell, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Project HomeSafe, which distributed free gun locks in the area last year, is asking recipients to call a national hotline for free replacements for the locks, which proved defective. J. Allen Nesbitt, director of Bucks County's Department of Corrections, said his office handed out nearly 2,000 of the free cable locks in August. The nationwide project was suspended in October when it was discovered that the locks, which had a spring-locking mechanism, could be opened without a key, he said.
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
A new telephone hotline - 458-KIDS - is designed to provide a friendly voice for latchkey children, who come home to an empty house after school. "This is an alternative for a child who's at home and is scared," said the Rev. Gordon Hendrickson, pastor of the United Methodist Church of the Resurrection in Lionville, who with the Western Main Line YMCA helped found the program. "It's for when they're home alone and the parent can't be reached," said Kathi Yerk, program director at the YMCA's Exton branch.
NEWS
March 29, 1992 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The call was from a male prostitute in Florida who had heard the news about "Uncle Ed" Friday night on CNN. He was very scared, and Fran Stoffa was telling him - as he was telling hundreds of others - that he needed to get tested for the virus that causes AIDS. "Don't worry about a problem until you know that it exists," said Stoffa, director of the Philadelphia Community Health Alternatives (PCHA), an organization that offers AIDS testing and counseling. "Sure, you can call the district attorney, but the important thing is you get tested to find out what your health status is first.
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | By Bill Price, Inquirer Staff Writer
Residents of the Eighth Police District in the Far Northeast who suspect drug activity in their neighborhoods can anonymously report such information to police. Recently, police set up a confidential drug hotline at the district headquarters, Red Lion and Academy Roads, to receive tips on suspected drug users and dealers. The number is 686-3198 and is manned 24 hours. "I want it (the hotline) to be used as an avenue for information of any drug activity in the district," said Capt.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she first walked through the maze of cubicles at the National Veterans Crisis Line in the winter of 2012, Ellen Goosenberg Kent thought she knew what to expect. Goosenberg Kent grew up in Philadelphia during the Vietnam era, the daughter of a Marine who had served in World War II. An Emmy-winning documentary filmmaker, she had already made two films about soldiers coping with broken bodies and spirits after returning home from war. This latest project, however, exploring the inner workings of the nation's suicide help line for veterans, surprised her and the film's producer, Dana Perry.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WAS ALL about love. And Tony Neri had an abundance of it. What else could have driven him out of his warm house on a bitter-cold New Year's Eve to check on the broken furnace of a desperate elderly woman in Southwest Philadelphia? Tony was in the basement of the home, working on the furnace, doing what he felt destined to do with his life - helping people in need - when he collapsed. He was rushed to Lankenau Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead of a ruptured aorta.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the wake of two student suicides in four days, the Burlington Township School District brought counselors into the high school Tuesday to assist students with their grieving and guard against further loss. School administrators gathered all staff and high school students Tuesday "to talk . . . and come together," according to Liz Scott, the district's spokeswoman. "Counseling was offered throughout the day in safe zones" around the building, she said. Children in lower grades who sought assistance also received counseling.
NEWS
October 7, 2014
ISSUE | VIP LINE Expand 311 Philly The findings from our report on overtime costs focused on whether proper oversight and approvals were met for the additional costs the city had incurred ("Wrong number," Oct. 1). The report did not criticize the work provided by any of the employees, and, in most cases, the departments provided justification for the overtime. However, we did bring to light the administration's approval of a City Hall hotline that is operated 24/7 to handle problems and issues that occur within the city, which also allows special access to individuals.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Jason Grant, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pick up that cellphone and make a call. Tell how being arrested for a small bit of marijuana in Philadelphia has changed your life. That's the latest request from City Councilman James Kenney as he continues to pound on Mayor Nutter to sign into law a measure that would make possessing a small amount of pot punishable by only a $25 fine, with no arrest. Since Tuesday, Kenney's staff has been handing out fliers promoting the at-large councilman's new marijuana-arrest hotline, which encourages callers to leave a detailed message and, "if possible, please include information about the loss of job opportunities or schooling opportunities.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the weekend, they put up posters in Audubon, Collingswood, Haddon Heights, and Mount Ephraim. And on Monday, they were busy in Oaklyn, Haddon Township, Bellmawr, and Runnemede. Pastor Randy Van Osten and members of his youth group at Oaklyn Baptist Church have joined scores of volunteers across the state who have placed tens of thousands of signs in businesses over the last two weeks to alert the public to human trafficking. Now, their work is bearing fruit. Tips have poured into the help hotline - 855-END-NJ-HT - as state law enforcement officials prepare for the expected trafficking increase ahead of the Feb. 2 Super Bowl at the Meadowlands.
NEWS
August 25, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Work for Sarah Janicki has been busy. And that is bad. Janicki handles client services for Women Against Abuse, and in the last year, the Philadelphia nonprofit has had a disturbing rise in the number of requests - and denials - for emergency housing. In 2012, the group had to turn down 8,400 requests for shelter from callers to its hotline. Though that included some people who made multiple calls over several days, it was up from 1,700 denials in 2007, she said. As the need for services and housing rises, Women Against Abuse is going through "a huge period of growth," Janicki said.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A suicide hotline for New Jersey has received about 300 calls since it was launched May 1, state officials said Thursday. The service - NJHOPELINE, or 855-654-6735 - was created after New Jersey's suicide rate for people 35 to 64 increased 31 percent from 1999 to 2010, officials reported. While the increase is cause for concern, New Jersey still has the second-lowest suicide rate in the nation, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The hotline is operated by University Behavioral HealthCare at the University of Medicine and Dentistry, using only New Jersey-based trained volunteer and professional counselors.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Hyung-jin Kim, Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea - Raising tensions with South Korea yet again, North Korea cut its last military hotline with Seoul on Wednesday, saying there was no need to continue military communications between the countries in a situation "where a war may break out at any moment. " The hotline - a dedicated phone link between the two militaries - was used mainly to arrange for South Koreans who work at an industrial complex in the North to cross the heavily armed border. When the connection was last severed in 2009, some workers were stranded in the North.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Jeff Bruskin, 21, a senior international politics and philosophy major, the annual Penn State dance marathon known as THON is a way to show the side of the university that has been all but drowned out the last few years. "It's not as big as our football culture, but our dance marathon, we are proud to say, is the largest student-run philanthropy in the world. " This weekend, after 46 hours of non-sit-down dancing by 710 dancers and a capacity crowd at the Bryce Jordan Center, the students announced that a record $12.3 million had been raised - putting the total collected for pediatric cancer since THON began in 1973 at more than $100 million.
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