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Hotline

NEWS
April 2, 1989 | By Christopher Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
People like to dump things in Falls Township. Things like old refrigerators. And couches with the stuffing hanging out. And big, bulging bags of trash. They like to dump things near highway on-ramps, in vacant lots, along little-traveled roads. "We have had a huge problem around the area," Michele Nagel, assistant environmental officer for the township, said last week. "People seem to just dump their trash wherever they feel like. We have 20 to 25 sites around the township where people just dump their trash.
NEWS
April 12, 1986 | By Julia Cass, Inquirer Staff Writer
A boy called to say that he knew where his father's gun was and intended to get it and shoot himself. A mother called for advice because she'd discovered, by reading her daughter's diary, that her daughter was thinking of hurting herself. In its first five days of operation, the new teen-suicide hotline at Hahnemann University Hospital has received calls from 10 distressed teenagers and four parents of teenagers. Two of the teenagers and their families have come in to Hahnemann this week to talk to therapists, although the boy who threatened to shoot himself gave a false name and address and could not be located after he hung up. "We're very concerned about him," said Dena Solomon, chief social worker for the adolescent psychiatric unit at Hahnemann and co-director of the hospital's newly established Prevention and Treatment Center for Adolescent Suicide, of which the hotline is one component.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one has gotten a reward, and no one has called seeking drug counseling, but Springfield Republican chief Charles P. Sexton Jr. says a drug hotline founded with much fanfare last fall is still a success. The special telephone line - set up by Sexton and financed with campaign contributions to the local party organization - connects callers to an answering machine manned by Police Chief Joseph J. Stumpf. So far, 14 people have used the line to give police the names of local drug dealers, Sexton said.
NEWS
May 15, 1995 | By Dominic Sama and Vyola P. Willson, FOR THE INQUIRER
A toll-free hotline, 800-722-4743, created to help small business owners understand and comply with clean air regulations, is now in service. Sponsored by the state Department of Environmental Resources (DER), the hotline will offer information about clean air regulations and provide quarterly newsletters, manuals and brochures on assorted topics. The hotline is aimed at small businesses such as auto body and paint shops, bakeries, dry cleaners, metal refinishers, degreasers and wood furniture finishers.
NEWS
November 8, 2001 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Teen Help Line, a hotline service that provides anonymous professional counseling and information for Delaware County teenagers, is up and running. Teens can call the line from 3:30 to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday at 610-352-TEEN. Emergency calls will be taken on a 24-hour basis, according to Christine Harms, of the Youth Response Network of Delaware County. "We saw this as a way to ensure the health and safety of our youth," Harms said. The hotline's debut was announced Friday at Upper Darby High School in Lansdowne.
NEWS
March 24, 1987 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a nondescript apartment a short walk from Mayakovsky Square in central Moscow, the telephone seldom stops ringing. Actually, there are seven phones ringing in seven cubicles, each four feet by six feet and furnished with two chairs and a desk. Every desk has a logbook filled with coded entries and meticulous notations. The notations are made by the interlocutors who sit in the cubicles; they leave only for scheduled breaks or to consult with one another. This is the nucleus of the Soviet Union's first crisis intervention center, a 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week service established in 1982 and known as the telefon daveriya, or "telephone of trust.
NEWS
May 15, 1995 | By Ty Tagami and Richard V. Sabatini, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Department of Environmental Resources has created a toll-free hotline to help small-business owners understand clean air regulations. The confidential information line can help dry cleaners, gas stations, print shops, auto body shops and metal finishers, for example, comply with the regulations. The information line is part of the state's AIRHELP program, which also provides information about financial assistance available to help with pollution equipment installation costs.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | By Larry Copeland, Inquirer Staff Writer
The call is etched in Kathleen Cherry's memory. Cherry, a volunteer with Talkline, a Roxborough-based telephone hotline service for troubled youth, took the call from a suicidal teenager who had taken an overdose of pills. Cherry notified her supervisor, who called an ambulance, and continued talking to the girl. Emergency rescue workers arrived at the girl's house just as she lost consciousness. They saved her. That time, Talkline was a lifeline. But the line is going dead.
NEWS
February 6, 1990 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
The school district has set up a 24-hour drug hotline to receive information about suspected drug activities in and near schools, officials announced yesterday. The hotline, already in operation, is run by the school district's security officers and will collect information confidentially, officials said. Chief of school security Al Dean said that of 6,810 serious incidents reported in the schools last year, only 266 - or 3.9 percent, involved drugs. While Dean said this suggests that drugs have not invaded the schools, drug incidents occur at rate of more than one per day for each of the 180 days that school is in session.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | By Sonia Krishnan, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Dr. Steven Hirshberg knows how hard it is for men to talk openly about infertility problems. Low sperm counts and sexual dysfunction are not exactly locker-room banter. And then, there is the stigma attached to something widely perceived as "a woman's problem," Hirshberg said. In response, Hirshberg, a urologist and male-infertility specialist at Abington Memorial Hospital's Toll Center for Reproductive Sciences, started a weekly hotline for men who have questions or concerns about infertility.
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