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Hotline

NEWS
July 10, 1990 | By Larry Copeland, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Roxborough-based telephone hotline for troubled youth, forced to shut down at the end of last month for lack of funds, reopened yesterday, thanks to the efforts of a state senator from Philadelphia and a local paper company. Sen. M. Joseph Rocks said he got $25,000 in state funds from the Department of Community Affairs for Talkline, which had been funded partly by a City Council Class 500 grant through a Northwest Philadelphia human services agency but was not funded for the next fiscal year.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Falls are a major cause of injury for people over 65, so the American Physical Therapy Association has created a toll-free hot line (877-NEED-A-PT) to answer questions about falls and how to prevent them. The hot line will be active from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 8. Risk factors associated with falls include: being older; being female; impairment of balance or walking; poor vision; leg or trunk weakness; reduced cognitive status (dementia); pre-existing medical conditions, such as Parkinson disease, stroke, or diabetes; being on more than four medications simultaneously; use of an assistive walking device; and a past history of falls.
NEWS
October 14, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a city that has trouble getting residents to rat on criminals, officials now want Philadelphians to tattle on a new kind of miscreant: truckers and bus drivers who leave their engines idling, spewing pollutants into the air. Yesterday, the Clean Air Council unveiled a hotline and Web resource, www.idlefreephilly.org - yes, there's an iPhone app - where sidewalk sleuths can report where, when, and how long idling occurs. Both city and state regulations prohibit drivers from leaving their engines idling for more than five minutes.
NEWS
November 2, 1995 | By Allie Shah, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The idea was born when Maryanne Olkowski began to notice the little things in her neighborhood: A lone child waiting for a school bus on the street corner, the well-traveled bike path that winds past a wooded campground before reaching Lower Salford Elementary School. She worried about her three children, who walk to the grammar school on their own each day. "I wondered, 'Am I just paranoid? Do I worry too much about my kids?' " But she found other parents were also concerned.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | By Sonia Krishnan, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Dr. Steven Hirshberg knows how hard it is for men to talk openly about infertility problems. Low sperm counts and sexual dysfunction are not exactly locker-room banter. And then, there is the stigma attached to something widely perceived as "a woman's problem," Hirshberg said. In response, Hirshberg, a urologist and male-infertility specialist at Abington Memorial Hospital's Toll Center for Reproductive Sciences, started a weekly hotline for men who have questions or concerns about infertility.
NEWS
November 19, 1996 | By David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
After meeting with about a dozen female House members, Army officials pledged yesterday to keep open indefinitely a hotline that female soldiers have been calling to report sexual misconduct. But the Army brass was cool to a proposal from several of the lawmakers that a permanent "ombudswoman" be named to investigate harassment complaints from Army women. Officials thought creating such a position might undermine the chain of command. The Republican and Democratic congresswomen met with four generals on Capitol Hill for a briefing on the Army's investigation of sexual-abuse complaints from female trainees at the Aberdeen, Md. Proving Ground and at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. training programs at other bases also are under scrutiny.
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Allen Reese and his partner wanted to have new wills drawn up six years ago, he did the natural thing. He looked for a lawyer. There was just one problem. There's no entry in the Yellow Pages that says: Lawyers Who Understand the Needs of Gay or Lesbian Clients. "I had to make some phone calls," recalled Reese, a founding member of Rainbow Place, a Woodbury-based community center for the South Jersey gay, lesbian and bisexual community. "It wasn't easy. " Reese finally found a good lawyer through some friends.
NEWS
January 11, 2004 | By Christine Schiavo and Leslie A. Pappas INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Bone-chilling cold that brought the thermometer to near zero yesterday apparently killed a man found in a West Philadelphia house without heat. It also prompted the city and utilities to reach out to residents without heat through a crisis hotline. "This is a life-or-death situation," said Andrea Swan, spokeswoman for the Department of Licenses and Inspections. The city Health Department did not have the name or age of the man, who was pronounced dead at Mercy Hospital of Philadelphia about 4:45 a.m. The man, who suffered from chronic pulmonary disease, died of hypothermia, said Jeff Moran, a Health Department spokesman.
NEWS
December 3, 2004 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Police Department will activate a round-the-clock school-violence hotline on Monday and will send armed plainclothes officers into schools based on phone tips about trouble brewing among students, Police Commissioner Sylvester M. Johnson said in an interview yesterday. The move comes amid community pressure over a wave of school-related assaults and shootings, and a rift between the schools chief and city administration over safety strategies. Johnson's comments about the hotline were a sneak preview of a city plan called Operation Safe Schools that is to be unveiled Monday.
NEWS
February 21, 2000 | By Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sick of abandoned cars plaguing their neighborhood and tired of waiting for City Hall's help, residents in North Philadelphia are introducing their own weapon in the war on blight this week: A telephone hotline designed to quickly identify and remove the eyesores before they become dangerous. The hotline (215-685-9961) will be staffed three days a week. Using computers donated by First Union Bank, police officers in North Philadelphia's 25th District will be able to track abandoned cars as soon as they are reported and, ideally, get them off the streets within 20 days.
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