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Hotline

FOOD
July 8, 1987 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
The operator could hear grunting on the other end of the line while she answered the woman's questions. Was there some problem? Was she all right? Oh, yes, the caller explained, she was just in labor and waiting for her other children to awaken from their naps before she headed to the hospital. Rather than waste the time, she said, she wanted to get details of the food company's baby-food label-saving program. On another food hotline, the caller said she had found her favorite candy while she was visiting in California.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pressure, pressure, pressure. The phones are buzzing, the switchboard is blinking, and in the middle of it all, Susan Tracie visualizes the giant face of America, awash in deadly chemicals. And herself trying to clean it all up. "Chemtrec, Washington, D.C.," she says into her phone. "Do you have a chemical emergency?" She clears her computer screen, and listens: In Texas, a drum of diphenylmethyl-diisocyanate is in danger of leaking. In Indiana, a railroad car is spewing sulfuric acid.
NEWS
November 30, 2008 | By Kevin Ferris
Operator: Transition hotline, can I help you? Caller: Uh, yeah, I've been reading about the transition . . . O: Yes, sir, only seven more weeks until The One takes the oath! C: Yeah, really looking forward to it. But I wanted to double-check something. O: Ask away, sir. We have answers you can believe in. C: I've been reading about some of the people who are going to help Barack Obama change Washington . . . O: The One. C: The who? O: The One. We don't say Obama.
NEWS
September 24, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Progress is being made, albeit slowly, in the court-enforced plan to overhaul New Jersey's child-welfare system, Human Services Commissioner James Davy told legislators yesterday. "We're doing a little better," he said. "We have a long ways to go. " A key barometer - the number of children under the watch of the Division of Youth and Family Services - dropped in July and August, the first dip in two consecutive months in a year and half. But with 67,558 children, the load remains near the historic high of 68,613 in June.
NEWS
October 3, 1993 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Finding recreational activities on a weekend or just an entertaining way to spend a day off is usually not a problem. Newspaper and TV advertisements list events for just about everyone, from opera lovers to fly fishermen or women. For the physically disabled, though, knowing about an event is not enough; accessibility is the central issue. Can the restaurant's bathrooms be managed without assistance? Are there heavy doors or steep ramps into the theater? These are the questions answered by the Barrier Awareness 24-hour special- events hotline.
NEWS
March 26, 1999 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
A group of black and Hispanic state lawmakers launched a toll-free hotline yesterday to encourage people to come forward and testify at three legislative hearings about alleged racial profiling by the state police. The Black and Latino Caucus also announced the schedule for those hearings, which will be held next month, one each in southern, central and northern New Jersey. In addition to members of the public, the caucus plans to invite Attorney General Peter Verniero and acting state police Superintendent Michael Fedorko to testify, said Assemblyman LeRoy J. Jones Jr. (D., Essex)
NEWS
November 16, 1997 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For many Chester County commuters, Monday morning has come to mean one thing - dealing anew with the hassles of road closures and traffic delays. Take heart, weary travelers. Help has arrived in the form of a new road-construction hotline. Callers may dial 610-431-2619 and get up-to-date information on road delays anywhere in the county. The hotline is the brainchild of Michael Herron, executive director of the Chester County Transportation Management Association, an organization that aims to promote the county's economy.
NEWS
June 5, 1994 | By Nicholas Wishart, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Nathan Minus, 15, has trouble with algebra. The little numbers and letters can be confusing, he says. So, every Tuesday, the Willingboro high school student sits down with a private tutor. They review problems, Minus says, until he gets them right. When the tutor leaves, however, the student is on his own. If the teenager thinks of a question while reviewing one night, he could ask his mother or sister, but aside from them there is nowhere else to turn. Until now. Beginning this week, Minus will no longer have to skip problems.
NEWS
November 1, 2003 | By Kristen A. Graham and Wendy Ruderman INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Federal lawmakers will investigate the case of four Collingswood boys allegedly starved by their adoptive parents, officials said yesterday. On Thursday, the House Ways and Means Subcommittee on Human Resources will hold its first hearing on "the intentional neglect and abuse of four adopted children in New Jersey," it announced in a statement. "It is hard to imagine how adults could intentionally starve children," Rep. Wally Herger (R., Calif.), subcommittee chairman, said in the statement.
NEWS
January 22, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just a sampling of cruelty calls received by the Pennsylvania SPCA last weekend is chilling: A Labrador retriever mix scalded by cooking grease. A Pomeranian found starved to death in a doghouse, his two tiny canine companions clinging to life in frigid conditions. The emaciated body of another dog found in an apartment by a landlord after his owner skipped out on the rent. And that was just in Philadelphia. Officials with the Pennsylvania SPCA, which is based in Philadelphia and operates six satellite facilities across the state, say those calls represent a tiny fraction of abuse cases statewide.
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