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NEWS
August 25, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Work for Sarah Janicki has been busy. And that is bad. Janicki handles client services for Women Against Abuse, and in the last year, the Philadelphia nonprofit has had a disturbing rise in the number of requests - and denials - for emergency housing. In 2012, the group had to turn down 8,400 requests for shelter from callers to its hotline. Though that included some people who made multiple calls over several days, it was up from 1,700 denials in 2007, she said. As the need for services and housing rises, Women Against Abuse is going through "a huge period of growth," Janicki said.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A suicide hotline for New Jersey has received about 300 calls since it was launched May 1, state officials said Thursday. The service - NJHOPELINE, or 855-654-6735 - was created after New Jersey's suicide rate for people 35 to 64 increased 31 percent from 1999 to 2010, officials reported. While the increase is cause for concern, New Jersey still has the second-lowest suicide rate in the nation, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The hotline is operated by University Behavioral HealthCare at the University of Medicine and Dentistry, using only New Jersey-based trained volunteer and professional counselors.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Hyung-jin Kim, Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea - Raising tensions with South Korea yet again, North Korea cut its last military hotline with Seoul on Wednesday, saying there was no need to continue military communications between the countries in a situation "where a war may break out at any moment. " The hotline - a dedicated phone link between the two militaries - was used mainly to arrange for South Koreans who work at an industrial complex in the North to cross the heavily armed border. When the connection was last severed in 2009, some workers were stranded in the North.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Jeff Bruskin, 21, a senior international politics and philosophy major, the annual Penn State dance marathon known as THON is a way to show the side of the university that has been all but drowned out the last few years. "It's not as big as our football culture, but our dance marathon, we are proud to say, is the largest student-run philanthropy in the world. " This weekend, after 46 hours of non-sit-down dancing by 710 dancers and a capacity crowd at the Bryce Jordan Center, the students announced that a record $12.3 million had been raised - putting the total collected for pediatric cancer since THON began in 1973 at more than $100 million.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Hurricane Sandy, Gov. Christie made an obscure service famous when he urged people in need of social services to call the 211 hotline. In Philadelphia, that gubernatorial endorsement only drove home the absence of a similar service across the river from New Jersey. But on Monday, officials with the United Way here announced the launch of a 211 hotline for the five-county Philadelphia area. Jill Michal, president and chief executive of the United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey, said the current economic climate and recent nearby crises such as Sandy prompted the Pennsylvania United Way to finally fund the service.
SPORTS
December 7, 2012 | Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - In the final days of Jovan Belcher's life, he could have taken advantage of numerous avenues for support provided by the Kansas City Chiefs and the NFL. This past July, the NFL established an emergency hotline that operates 24 hours a day and connects players, staff, and family members in crisis with mental-health professionals who are not affiliated with the league or its teams. There are also numerous symposiums and support personnel whose jobs are to ensure the well-being of the players.
NEWS
October 23, 2012 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the two years since George C. Venizelos took over the FBI's Philadelphia division, the North Jersey native has developed a sense of how corruption works here. The people and public officials are no more inherently corrupt than in other metropolises, according to Venizelos. But the government structure and history sometimes make the conditions ripe for graft. Take a densely populated area, add hundreds of agencies, departments, municipalities, and elected positions, and fold in a pay-to-play culture.
NEWS
October 23, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the two years since George C. Venizelos took over the FBI's Philadelphia division, the North Jersey native has developed a sense of how corruption works here. The people and public officials are no more inherently corrupt than in other metropolises, according to Venizelos. But the government structure and history sometimes make the conditions ripe for graft. Take a densely populated area, add hundreds of agencies, departments, municipalities, and elected positions, and fold in a pay-to-play culture.
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