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Houdini

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1989 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
Houdini lives in the person of Christopher Gates, appearing at Princeton's Catch a Rising Star comedy club through Sunday. Gates, fast becoming nationally recognized, is betting audiences at the club - to the tune of $8,000 per show - that he can extricate himself from 100 feet of rope wound around him by eight people selected from the audience. If Gates fails, each member of the tying committee is richer by $1,000. It's not known whether Gates has ever had to pony up. Performances, with his fellow comic Steve Skrovan, are tonight at 8:30 and 11, tomorrow at 7, 9:15 and 11:30 p.m., and Sunday at 8:30 p.m. Admission tonight and tomorrow is $10 and on Sunday, $8. Catch a Rising Star is in the Hyatt Regency Princeton, 102 Carnegie Center, Route 1 and Alexander Road.
NEWS
October 2, 1997 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man whom police nicknamed "Houdini" because he escaped custody twice the same night actually escaped three times, testimony disclosed yesterday during a preliminary hearing for Walter Seeley, 23, of Northeast Philadelphia. After fleeing the Bristol Township police lockup early on the morning of Aug. 20 in his second bid for freedom, Seeley caused Upper Gwynedd Police Officer Edward J. Robinson to wreck his private car, Robinson said. Seeley darted in front of the car on the Pennsylvania Turnpike next to the police station shortly after 1:30 a.m., Robinson told District Justice Joanne V. Kline.
SPORTS
September 20, 1993 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was just one call at first base. Just one call out of a hundred, a thousand, a million. But not if you're Mitch Williams, walking the tightrope again through a treacherous, season-turning ninth inning. When you do the old Houdini escape act day after day the way Mitch Williams does, you put yourself in position to have umpires sometimes ruin your life. And yesterday in Montreal, an umpire did just that. "I've dealt with losing before, but that was terrible," Williams snarled after umpire Charlie Williams' controversial call at first base became the pivotal play in the Phillies' painful 6-5 loss to the Expos.
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Bob Williams
The Colonial Theater in Phoenixville once hosted Broadway-bound musicals and even Houdini. It went out of business in 1996, but was restored with the help of a $75,000 grant from the Phoenixville Community Health Foundation and reopens today. Part of the 1958 Steve McQueen movie, "The Blob," was filmed at the Colonial.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a bird. It's a plane. No, it's . . . David Copperfield? Yup, the master illusionist is set to literally take off from the stage of the Spectrum's Showcase Theater when he appears (disappears?) for two performances Saturday, April 4. Copperfield, whose show is billed as "Magic for the Nineties," will debut several other illusions, including a large-screen seance with the late film director/actor Orson Welles; another in which he shrinks to eight inches tall; and yet another that has his assistant crawling through his body.
NEWS
December 12, 1998 | by Eric Mink, New York Daily News
If nothing else - and there is not much else - TNT has nerve. Even in the bizarro universe of TV hype, few operations can match this cable channel's chutzpah. "Tonight," blared TNT'S full-page newspaper ads last week, "don't miss the most talked-about film of the year. " Holy cow. "Godzilla" already on cable? "The Truman Show"? The new "Psycho"? Well . . . no. The ad referred to "Houdini," a made-for-TV movie that, so far as I'm aware, no one had inquired, wondered, discussed, argued or expressed curiosity about - certainly not to me - prior to its debut on TNT last week.
NEWS
September 19, 2010 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
Where to start with Boardwalk Empire , the magnificent, sweeping, wildly expensive series from The Sopranos top writer Terence Winter, by way of director Martin Scorsese, which premieres Sunday at 9 p.m. on HBO? How about in 1920, when the show opens, an exciting, postwar moment when the country was on the verge of unprecedented social change and economic prosperity, women were on the doorstep of universal suffrage, and the days of instant news, via radio, were beginning?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1995 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brett Daniels began playing around with magic at the age of 14. Like most newcomers to the game, he started with the easy stuff - card tricks, disappearing coins. But Daniels, who picked up books on the subject at the magic shops in his native Milwaukee, got the hang of it rather quickly. While still in his teens he was ready to unveil his first big illusion, after procuring a Houdini metamorphosis locker. Naturally, Daniels needed a pretty assistant. His little sister would do quite nicely.
SPORTS
February 26, 1997 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Hugh Alexander, still going strong at age 79, settled into a seat at the Carpenter Complex yesterday, lit a cigarette and began talking. " . . . All the tools, a five-tool player," the Cubs' scout emeritus was saying as another National League scout walked by. "This kid can run, throw, field, hit for average and hit for power. " The other scout shook his head and smiled. "I don't even have to ask who you're talking about," he said. Uncle Hughie, you see, makes no secret of the fact that he just loves Phillies rookie third baseman Scott Rolen.
SPORTS
September 6, 2010 | By Bob Kelley, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Hamilton on return: 'All signs point to not soon' Texas Rangers centerfielder Josh Hamilton was leading the majors in batting, then he hit a wall. No, we mean he really hit a wall. In the third inning of Saturday night's loss at Minnesota, Hamilton hit the center-field wall and bruised his left ribs while fielding a Delmon Young fly ball. He made the catch, so Young was out, but despite continuing to play, so was Hamilton two innings later. He told MLB.com Sunday that he felt "like I have been in a car wreck.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2016
_ JANE THE VIRGIN. 9 p.m. Monday, CW57. It's Mother's Day on the show that, its original premise aside, is one of the most realistic on television about what motherhood actually entails. _ HOUDINI & DOYLE. 9 p.m. Monday, Fox29. Even Harry Houdini (Michael Weston, House) can't escape TV's demand for amateur detectives in this period procedural that celebrates the magician's friendship with Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (Stephen Mangan, Episodes) X-Files-style. _ AMERICAN MASTERS: JANIS - LITTLE GIRL BLUE.
NEWS
May 1, 2016
* 2016 ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION CEREMONY. 8 p.m. Saturday, HBO. Cheap Trick, Chicago, Deep Purple, N.W.A. (pictured), Steve Miller, and late Atlantic Records founder Ahmet Ertegun are this year's inductees. Special includes tributes to David Bowie and Glenn Frey and recalls Prince's 2004 induction. * WHITE HOUSE CORRESPONDENTS DINNER. 6 p.m. Saturday, C-SPAN. Comedy Central's Larry Wilmore hosts. CNN covers it, too, but no one reports on the arrivals with the deadpan sincerity of C-SPAN.
NEWS
May 1, 2016
The Good Wife. Only one episode until the Mother's Day series finale. Is Peter going back to prison? Isn't this where we started? 9 p.m. Sunday on CBS. Penny Dreadful. Season 3 of the Gothic horror series premieres. 10 p.m. Sunday on Showtime. Houdini & Doyle. Even Harry Houdini (Michael Weston, House ) can't escape TV's demand for amateur detectives in this period procedural that celebrates the magician's friendship with Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (Stephen Mangan, Episodes )
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
Not even the great Harry Houdini can escape TV's unceasing demand for amateur detectives. Starting 9 p.m. Monday on Fox, the famed magician, played by Michael Weston ( House ), will join Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (Stephen Mangan, Episodes ) in Houdini & Doyle , a Canadian-British period drama that celebrates one of history's more interesting friendships, X-Files style. Doyle, the man behind literature's leading skeptic, is the Fox Mulder in this duo, a man who wants to believe in an afterlife and in communication with the dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Step into the tasty world of "Chocolate: The Exhibition" at the Academy of Natural Sciences through Jan. 24. Whether you're a chocolate novice or an informed enthusiast, you'll find you're learning things about this treat once deemed the food of the gods. The exhibition allows visitors to experience the chocolate craze of centuries past with activities such as the bartering of cacao seeds for goods in an Aztec market. Also explored are chocolate's origins and its journey across the Atlantic.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Sometimes you pick 'em right, and sometimes you don't. This was one of my don'ts. I chose EgoPo's The Life (and Death) of Harry Houdini as one of my three PIFA recommendations in Friday's Weekend section. Although I wasn't naive enough to expect a real magic show on stage, I did expect some stage magic, and not a dramatized Wikipedia biography of the world's most famous escape artist. Created/written/directed by Brenna Geffers (who has repeatedly proved herself an excellent director and who should stick to that)
NEWS
September 19, 2010 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
Where to start with Boardwalk Empire , the magnificent, sweeping, wildly expensive series from The Sopranos top writer Terence Winter, by way of director Martin Scorsese, which premieres Sunday at 9 p.m. on HBO? How about in 1920, when the show opens, an exciting, postwar moment when the country was on the verge of unprecedented social change and economic prosperity, women were on the doorstep of universal suffrage, and the days of instant news, via radio, were beginning?
SPORTS
September 6, 2010 | By Bob Kelley, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Hamilton on return: 'All signs point to not soon' Texas Rangers centerfielder Josh Hamilton was leading the majors in batting, then he hit a wall. No, we mean he really hit a wall. In the third inning of Saturday night's loss at Minnesota, Hamilton hit the center-field wall and bruised his left ribs while fielding a Delmon Young fly ball. He made the catch, so Young was out, but despite continuing to play, so was Hamilton two innings later. He told MLB.com Sunday that he felt "like I have been in a car wreck.
NEWS
August 9, 2009 | By Anne Supsic FOR THE INQUIRER
These days, it's best known as the setting of the quirky TV sitcom The Office, or as Electric City, because it operated the first electric trolley system. But it was daredevil Harry Houdini who lured me here - and he's been dead for 83 years. Now, that's a magic trick. It started as a day trip for my husband, Frank, and myself to explore the Houdini Museum - touted as the only building in the world devoted to the famous escapologist - with our grandson, Christopher, 12. And it expanded to a Weekend Journey a few weeks later, to tour this city of more than 70,000 that's enjoying a cultural renaissance, with historic sites that celebrate the industrial past; glorious, restored buildings; and a vibrant ethnic diversity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Full of forced jocularity and drawing-room hissy fits, with its cast parading around in vintage threads and antique cars, Easy Virtue is a close-to-insufferable souffle based on the 1925 Noel Coward play. Jessica Biel, with wavy blond locks and a game grin, stars as a glammy American divorcee (and race-car driver) - a free spirit who charms the pants off Englishman John Whittaker (Ben Barnes) when they meet in the south of France. Meet, and marry. And then John brings his new bride Larita back to face the family: a snooty matriarch played by Kristin Scott Thomas, the depressed and cynical Mr. Whittaker (Colin Firth)
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