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House Arrest

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October 13, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Darryl Strawberry's impromptu visit to a Manhattan nightclub this week could land him behind bars for violation of the six-month house arrest sentence handed down at his income tax trial. "We've turned the case over to the probation department," Deputy U.S. Attorney Shirah Neiman said yesterday. The New York Yankees outfielder stopped inside a Manhattan nightclub Monday night without permission from his probation officer. Strawberry was sentenced April 24 to six months' house arrest following his guilty plea to a tax-evasion charge.
NEWS
February 23, 2006 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The electronic bracelet around Alexander Elkin's ankle alerted no one as he took a detour from work. Meant to monitor Elkin, 45, while he was on house arrest for assault, the device didn't deter him from tracking down and killing his ex-wife, Alla, in a parking lot in the Far Northeast on Oct. 7. Or from murdering Alla's friend, Irina Sulimova, 35, as she stood outside a deli. Seven hours after Elkin killed the women and then himself with a .40-caliber handgun, Bucks County prison officials learned something was wrong.
NEWS
April 12, 2008 | By Dwight Ott and Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Eli Karetny, who operated the riverside nightclub that collapsed into the Delaware in 2000 killing three women, was released from house arrest yesterday, angering victims' relatives. Philadelphia Common Pleas Judge Sheila Woods-Skipper said it was "standard" to release house-arrest defendants after they served the minimum sentence. Karetny, 67, of Cherry Hill, passed the minimum of his nine- to 18-month sentence last month, and Woods-Skipper said court personnel who monitor Karetny could be better used on other offenders.
NEWS
August 11, 2001 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A lot of judges like them. And, for many folks facing time for minor charges, it sure beats going to jail. But for now, the increasingly popular electronic-monitoring anklets that allow nonviolent offenders to serve under house arrest instead of behind bars are in short supply in Philadelphia. Because of that, more than 50 people ordered by judges to begin house arrest are still in jail, waiting for an ankle device to become available. And as more inmates are stuffed into the city's already overcrowded jails, the cost of housing them will increase as well.
NEWS
February 19, 2010 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a mob scene at the Saloon, the popular South Philadelphia restaurant, during a Christmas party for a bunch of wiseguys. And it nearly landed mobster Steven Mazzone back in jail. Instead, Mazzone, 46, was sentenced yesterday to six months of electronically monitored house arrest for violating the terms of his probation by attending what authorities have described as a Cosa Nostra Christmas party Dec. 17. Mazzone, released last year after serving the bulk of a nine-year sentence for racketeering, is currently serving a three-year term of supervised release.
NEWS
November 9, 2010 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
A high-ranking Philadelphia police officer indicted Friday on federal extortion and bribery charges pleaded not guilty before a federal magistrate yesterday. Police Inspector Daniel Castro, who had been under 24-hour house arrest over the weekend, is no longer under house arrest. U.S. Magistrate Thomas Reuter removed that condition yesterday before Castro's arraignment but ordered all previous conditions of bail - including no contact with other witnesses - to remain in force. Castro, 47, dressed in a dark-blue suit, white shirt and tie, sat quietly in the courtroom, surrounded by family members.
NEWS
July 18, 1998 | STEVEN M. FALK/ DAILY NEWS
A man barricaded himself in a house at 8th and Pemberton streets, South Philadelphia, yesterday afternoon, and kept police at bay for nearly seven hours before SWAT team members dragged him from the building.
NEWS
June 18, 1997 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The prosecutor asked for the big house for the 19-year-old man convicted of trying to throw a cop off a second-floor roof last year. But the judge sent the man to his own house on 5th Street near Cumberland instead. Common Pleas Judge Marlene F. Lachman this week sentenced Jonathan Ruiz to four to 23 months of house arrest, two years' probation and 30 hours of community service. Defense lawyer Louis T. Savino Jr. called his client's action "an aberration. " Savino said Ruiz may have been high on marijuana when the incident occurred during an arrest on a roof on 2nd Street near Diamond Oct. 7. Assistant District Attorney Harry Spaeth said Ruiz was driving a stolen car when he was stopped by cops at Philip and Diamond streets and fled to the roof.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer
Robert M. Drinane Jr. 18, a University of Delaware freshman, doesn't have much of a summer vacation to look forward to. He'll be under house arrest. Drinane, who last year graduated third in a class of 286 at Conestoga Valley High School, where he was a star athlete and member of the National Honor Society, was charged in August with drunken driving and underage drinking. He pleaded guilty, and was sentenced yesterday by Lancaster County Judge Michael J. Perezous to stay home for the summer.
NEWS
March 3, 2011 | By MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com 215-854-5949
The curious case of James Cialella came to a close yesterday when a Philadelphia judge sentenced the Iraq War Army veteran to house arrest and probation for shooting a fellow moviegoer on Christmas Day 2008. Cialella, 32, could have been jailed for nine to 16 months for the shooting, which grew from a fight at the United Artists Riverview Plaza theater on Columbus Boulevard during a showing of "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button. " Common Pleas Judge Genece Brinkley instead sentenced Cialella to 11 1/2 to 23 months of house arrest followed by five years of probation.
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NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
AFTER Frank Sinatra became an elder statesman, before David Cassidy and Davy Jones took over Tiger Beat and in between Elvis Presley and The Beatles , the pop idol who made the girls swoon was South Philly's own Bobby Rydell . Born April 26, 1942, Rydell won a TV talent show for children and never looked back. He charted with "Kissin' Time" in 1959, had a string of gold records, became the youngest headliner ever at New York's Copacabana in 1961, starred in the 1963 movie version of Bye, Bye Birdie opposite Ann-Margret and Dick Van Dyke , and after 50-plus years of performing lived to perform again after a double-organ transplant at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in 2012.
NEWS
February 7, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
Sitting in a Philadelphia courtroom Friday after violating probation for the fourth time in eight years, Meek Mill asked a judge, again, for a second chance. "I believe I can be the bright star you expect me to be," he told Common Pleas Court Judge Genece Brinkley. A month ago, Brinkley threatened to send the North Philadelphia rapper to state prison for violating his probation for a 2008 drug and gun conviction. But after a 41/2-hour hearing in which a life coach, a charter school executive, a former judge, and an R&B legend testified on Mill's behalf, Brinkley sentenced him to at least 90 days of house arrest instead.
NEWS
December 25, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Msgr. William J. Lynn, the first Roman Catholic Church official convicted in the United States for covering up child sex abuse by priests, wants out of prison and to have his case assigned to a new judge. A day after a Pennsylvania Superior Court panel overturned - for a second time - the 64-year-old's 2012 conviction, his lawyer, Thomas A. Bergstrom, sought an emergency bail hearing for his client and the removal of Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina from the case. In court filings Wednesday, Bergstrom cited Sarmina's "previous harsh sentence and other rulings," as well as her decision to admit evidence at trial of decades worth of child-abuse complaints involving Philadelphia area priests, some of which predated Lynn's tenure as secretary for clergy for the Philadelphia Archdiocese.
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jafar Panahi's Taxi. The Iranian filmmaker, technically under house arrest and banned from making movies in his homeland, drives a cab around Tehran, picking up passengers and capturing their conversations, their troubles, their hopes and fears on a tiny dashboard camera. From the confines of an automobile, a whole world emerges. No MPAA rating Bridge of Spies. Tom Hanks and Mark Rylance star in Steven Spielberg's taut Cold War thriller, a based-on-true-events spy-swap yarn set in New York and Berlin, steeped in paranoia and period detail.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former "hanging judge" of Philadelphia Traffic Court - a man so known for meting out tough justice to scofflaws that colleagues nicknamed him "the Terminator" - caught a break Friday when it came time for him to face up to his own crimes. Fortunato N. Perri Sr., 78, was sentenced to two years of federal probation for using his influence to have dozens of traffic tickets tossed in exchange for bribes of shrimp, crab cakes, and pornographic videos. The sentence was nothing less than an act of mercy for a man who once sentenced a driver to two years in jail for racking up $20,000 in traffic fines, but told him he would rather "give [him]
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
FORMER TRAFFIC Court Judge Fortunato N. Perri Sr., who pleaded guilty in 2013 to federal fraud charges related to a ticket-fixing scam, is unlikely to get jail time when he is sentenced on Friday. A federal memorandum filed Monday said house arrest was appropriate for Perri, 78, because of his medical condition. Court-ordered examinations, including an MRI, showed that Perri's health has declined after two strokes. And, according to a separate sentencing memo filed yesterday by defense attorney Brian McMonagle, Perri also has Crohn's disease and macular degeneration.
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The only Philadelphia Traffic Court judge convicted on corruption charges tied to the court's ticket-fixing culture may just walk away with one of the lightest sentences in the case. In court filings this week, prosecutors pushed for house arrest for Fortunato N. Perri Sr., the court's 78-year-old former administrative judge, who admitted he helped toss dozens of citations in exchange for gifts of seafood and pornography. He is scheduled to be sentenced Friday and could face up to two years under federal sentencing guidelines.
NEWS
July 19, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
He lost his courthouse job, his marriage was strained, and he was publicly vilified and humiliated. All in all, Jean Maurice Casseus' sentence of six to 12 months of house arrest and four years' probation Friday for patronizing a prostitute he later learned was 15 years old was anticlimactic. Even Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Sandy L.V. Byrd noted that "some might say he has paid quite a heavy price" for the June 7, 2012, rendezvous at the Days Inn on Roosevelt Boulevard near Adams Avenue in Crescentville.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Msgr. William J. Lynn, the first Catholic Church official convicted in the clergy sex-abuse scandal, returned to prison Thursday after a Philadelphia judge ordered him to resume his sentence for child endangerment. Lynn, 64, was taken to the Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility, about four miles across Northeast Philadelphia from the rectory of St. William parish in Crescentville, where he had lived on house arrest since January 2014. Lynn's lawyer, Thomas A. Bergstrom, said he would challenge Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina's ruling.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The question of whether Msgr. William J. Lynn may remain on house arrest or must return to prison to complete his three- to six-year term for child endangerment will be heard Thursday by a Philadelphia judge. The hearing was set by Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina after the District Attorney's Office moved to have the Catholic cleric's bail revoked when the state Supreme Court reinstated Lynn's conviction Monday. Lynn, 64, was convicted following a landmark 13-week trial in 2012 involving his role supervising priests accused of sexually abusing children.
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