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NEWS
September 12, 1994
Imagine a body that's cut vertically into two halves - a body with more than 200 parts, most of them weak. That sums up the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. It's sharply divided along party lines, and only a few members of the majority party have much power at all. The way Harrisburg is run, most representatives - even some from the majority party - have the devil's own time even getting legislation out of committee for a vote on the floor. There's something to be said for the discipline and focus on agenda that comes from strong party leadership.
NEWS
February 3, 1993 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The great rules furor that kept the state House from functioning properly ended peaceably yesterday, at least for the time being, when those who wanted reforms bowed to the wishes of Democratic leaders. Democratic mavericks have at least temporarily dropped their fight to reduce perks, such as their state-leased cars and per diem allowances, and to change operating procedures. In return, House Democratic leaders have rescinded their decision to cut the staffs of the renegades. As part of the agreement, which was approved 199-4, House Majority Leader Ivan Itkin (D., Allegheny)
NEWS
January 6, 1999 | By Glen Justice, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
With hands on Bibles, standing amid a sea of flowers and family on the House and Senate floors, members of the Pennsylvania legislature were sworn in yesterday, beginning terms that will steer the state toward the new millennium. Highlighting the day was the reelection of Rep. Matthew J. Ryan (R., Delaware), who survived a no-show coup attempt to win a fourth term as speaker of the House. Democratic leaders and a pair of dissident Republicans had talked of a challenge in recent weeks, but no opposition stepped forward yesterday.
SPORTS
November 1, 2008 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Commissioner Bud Selig had decided beforehand that Game 5 of the World Series must go nine innings, no matter the weather conditions or whether Thanksgiving would be celebrated before he awarded the championship trophy. But in Las Vegas, nearly all the sports books played by baseball's old rules, which meant a five-inning, 2-1 victory for the Phillies over the Tampa Bay Rays at the time the game was suspended Monday night. Kenny White, chief operating officer of Las Vegas Sports Consultants, said yesterday that under Nevada state rules, if the top half of an inning is played but the bottom half is not when play is called, and the home team is trailing or tied, the game reverts to the previous inning.
NEWS
January 14, 2011
An ethics complaint filed Wednesday alleges that the new congressman from Bucks County missed his swearing-in to attend a fund-raiser. If that's true, it's a pretty good sign that Rep. Michael Fitzpatrick (R., Pa.) believes his main job is to raise money to get reelected. By effectively launching his reelection bid even before taking the oath of office, Fitzpatrick comes off as cynical or clueless. Considering that he held this congressional seat before being exiled for two terms by former U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy (D., Pa.)
NEWS
January 22, 1986 | By Dan Meyers, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The House Rules Committee, responding to requests from representatives, voted yesterday to open all House expense records to the public. The decision, which the full House is scheduled to vote on today, averted a messy legislative battle that some representatives had promised if the rules were not changed. "I think it's fantastic," said Rep. James C. Greenwood (R., Bucks), who had drafted a resolution to change the rules. "Score one for the taxpayers. " Greenwood said he had agreed to withhold the introduction of the resolution until the Rules Committee voted.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Mark Fazlollah, Jonathan Tamari, and Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writers
U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, who has been contending with a long-running federal investigation, told Congress this week that federal prosecutors in Philadelphia had subpoenaed "certain documents" from his congressional offices. Following House rules that require such disclosure, the Philadelphia Democrat notified Speaker John A. Boehner of the subpoena in a letter dated Monday, saying that he believed some of the information prosecutors demanded was protected by congressional privilege and that he would fight to stop its release.
NEWS
September 18, 2009 | By GLENN THRUSH
After the imbroglio over Rep. Joe Wilson's "You lie!" during the president's address to Congress on health care, House Rules Committee Chairwoman Louise Slaughter (D-N.Y.) released an updated primer for members regarding conduct on the floor and in committees. Under section 370 of the House Rules and Manual, it has been held that a Member could: Refer to the government as "something hated, something oppressive. " Refer to the president as "using legislative or judicial pork.
NEWS
May 31, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
The Justice Department's Public Integrity Section, which investigates charges of wrongdoing by public officials, has opened a preliminary probe of embattled House Speaker Jim Wright's finances, department officials said yesterday. Previously, the department's position was that it would await the outcome of proceedings against Wright in the House, where he has been charged by the ethics committee with 69 instances of violating House rules. No explanation was immediately available for the policy switch, which means the Justice Department will now determine whether there is enough evidence to warrant a formal grand jury investigation.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
House Speaker Jim Wright and self-described former call girl Pamella Bordes, a one-time researcher in Parliament, are pictured together in a 1983 photograph printed today by the British newspaper the Daily Mail. Wright is currently under investigation for alleged unethical conduct. Bordes, 26, is a former Miss India whose sex and scandal memoirs involving rich and powerful men around the world are being serialized by the London tabloid. The paper reported today in the second installment of her memoirs that the picture of her and Wright was taken in Wright's office on Capitol Hill before he became House speaker.
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REAL_ESTATE
May 31, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I keep asking buyers and real estate agents about access to credit, and whether it's any easier to get a mortgage. "No problem," is the typical answer. "I can only speak for us about mortgages, and as of now we are not having any issues," said Emily Tyszka, who recently bought a house in Audubon, Camden County. Zillow, the real estate search engine, recently reported that in the final quarter of last year, credit tightened slightly, especially for borrowers with low down payments - meaning first-time buyers.
NEWS
March 16, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON Gov. Christie's administration on Friday won more time from the state Supreme Court to write new rules to jump-start the state's affordable housing program. The decision vacated a recent appellate court ruling that ordered the Council on Affordable Housing (COAH) - which has been near-dormant under Christie's administration - to resume meeting immediately, setting a deadline this month for the agency to create new rules. In a 5-1 decision, the state's high court said COAH could have until May 1, the date it requested, to produce new rules outlining how many affordable homes must be available in each municipality.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Mark Fazlollah, Jonathan Tamari, and Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writers
U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, who has been contending with a long-running federal investigation, told Congress this week that federal prosecutors in Philadelphia had subpoenaed "certain documents" from his congressional offices. Following House rules that require such disclosure, the Philadelphia Democrat notified Speaker John A. Boehner of the subpoena in a letter dated Monday, saying that he believed some of the information prosecutors demanded was protected by congressional privilege and that he would fight to stop its release.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON The state agency ordered by the New Jersey Supreme Court to write rules governing the creation of affordable housing has not met since the order or taken any steps to comply, according to a legal motion filed by housing advocates. The Council on Affordable Housing (COAH) has responded to the Supreme Court order with "outright defiance," according to the motion filed by Fair Share Housing Center, a nonprofit based in Cherry Hill. The council has not met since the court's decision was issued Sept.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | VOTERAMA IN CONGRESS
WASHINGTON - The Senate conducted no votes in this opening week of the 113th Congress. Here is how Philadelphia-area representatives voted on major issues: House Hurricane Sandy aid. Voting 354-67, the House on Friday passed a bill (HR 41) to increase federal borrowing by $9.7 billion to accommodate National Flood Insurance claims by property owners victimized by Hurricane Sandy in late October. This new borrowing would be added to an existing National Flood Insurance Program deficit of more than $20 billion, most of which is attributable to claims from Hurricane Katrina in 2005.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - For nearly 30 years, a court ruling aimed at preventing discrimination against low-income families has informed decisions on how much affordable housing New Jersey towns must have. Those guidelines could change significantly if the state Supreme Court agrees with municipalities and the Christie administration that development should determine the number of low-cost units in a town. The court heard arguments on the issue Wednesday during a five-hour hearing. Chief Justice Stuart Rabner and Appellate Judge Mary Catherine Cuff, who is temporarily filling a vacancy on the high court, were not present.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - For nearly 30 years, a court ruling aimed at preventing discrimination against low-income families has informed decisions on how much affordable housing New Jersey towns must have. Those guidelines could change significantly if the state Supreme Court agrees with municipalities and the Christie administration that development should determine the number of low-cost units in a town. The court heard arguments on the issue Wednesday during a five-hour hearing. Chief Justice Stuart Rabner and Appellate Judge Mary Catherine Cuff, who is temporarily filling a vacancy on the high court, were not present.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
Change comes hard to Harrisburg. Republican Rep. Curt Schroder, of Chester County, who will quit the state House after 17-plus years on Sunday, knew that intuitively when he arrived at the Capitol in January 1995. But it's a lesson that has been drummed in, time and again. Lincoln said he'd gotten his schooling "by littles. " That's how reform has come to the House, even after the scandal of Bonusgate and the public uproar over a 2005 legislative pay raise enacted late at night, when much of the public literally was sleeping.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Just when employment and the president's job-approval numbers were ticking upward, a new Obama administration mandate has sparked an uproar over religious freedom that risks alienating American Catholics, a key group of swing voters in the November electorate. At issue is a regulation, stemming from the 2010 health-care law, that requires religious-affiliated institutions such as colleges, hospitals, and charities to offer free contraception as part of health-insurance coverage for their workers, as other employers must.
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