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NEWS
November 10, 2006
REMOVE A LEG from a three-legged stool, and it collapses. Effectively remove a branch from the federal government - and it, too, will fall. We may never know how close this nation came to seeing that happen. By electing Democratic majorities in both houses of Congress this week (the Senate was decided only yesterday with Virginia Sen. George Allen's concession), American voters began to restore our constitutional system of checks and balances. Over the past six years, President Bush, with the acquiescence of Republicans in Congress, has often placed his administration above the law, operating without oversight or accountability.
NEWS
March 16, 2005 | By Maria Recio INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R., Texas) fired back at his critics yesterday, saying that his expenses-paid trips to Scotland and South Korea had been handled properly and that reports about his connections to gambling interests were full of "implication and innuendo. " DeLay, who was admonished three times last year by the House ethics committee, has had a wave of bad publicity lately from news reports about outside groups funding his trips in possible violation of House rules and his ties to scandal-ridden former associates.
NEWS
March 11, 1997 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cloning sheep was remarkable enough. But legislators? One would have been forgiven for considering that possibility yesterday while pondering the attendance roll call of the state House of Representatives. The mystery: Rep. Connie Williams, a Montgomery County Democrat who took office in January, was recorded as voting on three resolutions that came up while the House was in session from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Yet she was 100 miles away in her district, attending a student meeting at Lower Merion High School.
NEWS
January 16, 1986 | By Dan Meyers, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
When the House returns next week after a winter recess, some legislators will try to open up its expense-account rules, which now bar the public from seeing receipts, a Bucks County legislator said yesterday. "This secrecy cannot be defended and must not continue," said Rep. James C. Greenwood (R., Bucks). "I believe that the position of the leadership on this matter is embarrassing to most House members. " Greenwood said that when the House reconvenes Tuesday he will ask that it change the expense-account rules to make all legislators' requests for reimbursements, and all supporting bills and receipts, available to the public.
NEWS
January 9, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: So I did something I know is wrong. During a recent visit, my mother-in-law checked her e-mail and never logged out. Instead of doing the right thing and logging it out, I read her sent mail. I had a hunch she was talking negatively about my husband and me, and unfortunately my hunch was confirmed. She is spreading some pretty nasty lies about us to our family and her friends. Now, I know how bad this makes me look. I will say openly that some of what she wrote was correct - I can be fussy, I can be particular - but I am always polite about it and keep those behaviors to my house only.
NEWS
September 29, 2004
Is the possibility of censure by his colleagues enough of a disincentive to keep a state legislator from holding an interest in a new slots parlor in Philadelphia? Bet the house that somebody would be willing to risk the sting of a letter of reprimand, or even the loss of a legislative committee post, if it meant winning a potentially life-changing bonanza. That is the main problem with House Speaker John Perzel's proposal to pass a House "rule" to ban members from having any ownership in one of the 14 slots operations authorized under the state's legalized gambling law passed in July.
NEWS
November 15, 1991 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The state House of Representatives has added a new member to its sergeant- at-arms staff - the son of a Philadelphia legislator. Frank L. Oliver Jr., the son of Rep. Frank L. Oliver (D., Phila.), was hired in April to be a sergeant-at-arms on the House floor, according to a review of House payroll documents. His salary is $15,000 a year. Neither the state Ethics Act nor House rules prohibits the child of a House member from working for the House, although the Ethics Act forbids a public official to use his position for the financial benefit of himself or a member of his immediate family.
NEWS
March 15, 1989 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
House Speaker Jim Wright, under increasing pressure as an ethics investigation into his behavior nears completion, said yesterday that he would not run for speaker again if he thought that "most of my colleagues didn't want me. " Wright - normally feisty and eager for combat - appeared reflective and almost subdued as he acknowledged for the first time that being speaker was not of paramount importance to him. While insisting that he did...
NEWS
March 11, 2005 | By James Kuhnhenn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, whose aggressive use of power has earned him ethics reprimands in the past, is drawing fresh fire on Capitol Hill this week over his role in a Texas political-financing operation and reports of possible travel irregularities in violation of House rules. House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi of California yesterday renewed her call for the House ethics committee to determine whether DeLay's activities required further investigation. Some House Republicans worried that the revival of an ethics flap surrounding DeLay (R., Texas)
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | By Richard Cohen
Sometimes a politician with something to hide is told by naive advisers that he has nothing to hide - and ought to come out swinging. Maybe that explains why Jim Wright, speaker of the House, has held a press conference, turned up on Sunday talk shows and become as ubiquitous as Washington's summer humidity. Wright has been ill-advised. He has plenty to hide. The immediate subject of keen interest is Wright's book, Reflections of a Public Man, a compilation of sayings and trite observations that was snatched up by the carload by, among others, the Teamsters, some lobbyists and no general readers of record.
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