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Housing Developments

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NEWS
March 13, 1988 | By Deborah A. Russell-Brown, Special to The Inquirer
The Haverford Planning Commission laid the groundwork for possible future water and sewer lines at its meeting last week as it endorsed applications for two housing developments. Iacobucci Bros. Contractors received unanimous backing for an application to construct Greenview Estates, a nine-lot subdivision at Glendale Road and Fairview Avenue, even though the commissioners expressed concern about storm- water management. "We have our own watershed, but they (Haverford Township)
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | By Kathy Knaub, Special to The Inquirer
A revised ordinance for planned residential development in Thornbury Township was shelved Tuesday by the Board of Supervisors until more information is obtained from the Planning Commission. Supervisors Chairman Steven Bates said the board was under no pressure to pass the ordinance, which addresses the creation of housing developments in keeping with the rural nature of the township. He said the proposals would be discussed at a Sept. 17 work session. "You have to understand that we're dealing with input from a lot of different areas and have to put that all together into one ordinance," Bates said.
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | By Lisa Moorhead, Special to The Inquirer
The countdown is on for the mailing of 1990 census forms to local households in March, but some Delaware County boroughs and townships fear a good number of dwellings may be counted out in the population tally. Local governments such as Aston, Chester Heights, Upper Chichester and Haverford have alerted the Census Bureau's regional office in Philadelphia that a large number of dwellings, mostly housing developments that have been built in the last four or five years, have been excluded from the bureau's preliminary mailing lists.
NEWS
July 21, 1995 | By Russell Gold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For the last five years, a development once known for crime and fires has cleaned house by evicting almost 200 families. But success at Warminster Heights has come at a price, say Bucks County Juvenile Court officials: Many of the evicted families are moving to two nearby housing developments, causing crime rates among minors there to soar. The connection between Warminster Heights and the other communities - Centennial Village in Warminster and Warrington Mews - is strong.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City officials say they will rebuild an entire neighborhood with about $192 million in public and private money, including a $35 million federal housing grant to be awarded today. Richard McGrath, a spokesman for U.S. Sen. Robert Torricelli (D., N.J.), said yesterday that Atlantic City would be one of two cities in New Jersey to receive Hope 6 grants from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. HUD Secretary Andrew Cuomo has scheduled a news conference for this morning in Newark to announce the grants for Atlantic City and Newark, which will receive a similar amount of money.
NEWS
October 25, 1996 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A township proposal to enact stricter zoning laws defining lot-size and open-space requirements for residential developments has pitted the supervisors against the Church Farm School and Toll Bros. Representatives of the school and Toll announced their opposition Tuesday at the opening hearing on the proposed ordinances, which could affect about 400 acres of prime real estate owned by the two entities. Toll and the Church Farm School took up the 45-minute time limit on the hearing.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2003 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The model home with a fieldstone facade in rural Bucks County is far larger than the average U.S. residence and too expensive for 90 percent of Americans. "Beautiful," Bob Toll said, as he opened his arms to embrace the well-appointed corner-lot house and its surroundings. "Remember the idea that smaller is better?" Toll said later in an interview. "It was B.S. then and it's B.S. now. People want size. It's the capitalist system and it has its own logic. People want more. " And Toll is giving it to them in the form of thousands of big houses that cost on average nearly $600,000 and are hugely popular with home buyers.
NEWS
July 8, 2010
A subsidiary of Voorhees-based American Water Works Co. Inc. said Tuesday that it has been awarded a $3.4 million contract to build a wastewater treatment plant in Islip, New York, to serve about 1,000 people in two housing developments. The subsidiary, Applied Water Management, signed the agreement with Home Properties, Inc.    - Andrew Maykuth
NEWS
November 6, 1995 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It had seemed like a chance to kill two birds with one stone. The city government, which incurred $4.5 million in debt in 1994 and is expected to add at least $5.3 million to that this year, was looking for revenue. The Chester Housing Authority wanted beefed-up security patrols at its housing developments and was willing to pay city police $250,000 a year to do the job. A state Department of Community Affairs team, assigned to help bridge the gap between spending and income after the city was declared financially distressed this year, strongly recommended that the city accept the offer.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | By Christina Asquith, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Kennett Consolidated school board voted Monday to buy $1.5 million worth of farmland in the rapidly growing southwestern edge of the district for a new Kennett Middle School. The school, to open in 2002 with about 1,200 students, will stand on 79 acres near the Delaware line, just south of Route 41 near Newark Road. That is more than twice the 37 acres now shared by the connected middle and high schools in Kennett Square. School officials say the region is losing so much open space to housing developments, which bring more children to the schools, that they bought enough space to also build a fourth elementary school in the future.
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SPORTS
October 13, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, Daily News Staff Writer neiburj@phillynews.com
SUNRISE, Fla. - Sunrise Boulevard isn't quite Packer Avenue, and Panther Parkway is by no means Broad Street. The roads that lead up to BB&T Center are filled with housing developments and a few shopping malls. The streets are lined with palm trees. Just west of the arena that houses the Florida Panthers are miles and miles of swamplands. This is where Peter Luukko chose to take on a challenge. The former president and chief operating officer of the Flyers and Comcast Spectacor was hired by the Panthers in February.
NEWS
September 30, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Dan Levin moved to Concord Township in 1998, he found solace in a home surrounded by open, untouched land. The western Delaware County municipality remained largely rural even as development boomed elsewhere across the county. Fewer than 10,000 people called the quiet, 14-square-mile township home. Traffic was light, green space plentiful. But in the new millennium, thousands have flocked to Concord, the population has nearly doubled, housing developments have sprouted, open land has dwindled.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of Philadelphia's biggest landlords is part of a plan to build up to 10 stories of housing along what could be the city's last remaining cobblestone lane, but officials say the project should be scrapped. The proposal for the brick and limestone apartment block involving PMC Property Group would replace a parking lot at the corner of Arch Street and the narrow lane known as Little Boys Court, near Second Street in Old City, according to plans filed with the Philadelphia Historical Commission.
REAL_ESTATE
December 1, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
When you ask residential developers in Philadelphia who their target audience is, the typical response is "eds and meds," meaning those who work in education and health care. Both seem impervious to the economic stresses and strains that affect other business sectors, so developers who focus on building for-sale and rental units near medical centers and universities are not taking great risks. Health care is the fastest growing because America is aging rapidly and demand for services is increasing.
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Burlington City officials gathered in a gravel lot on the Delaware on Tuesday to cheer ambitious plans for a community rebirth they hoped would mirror that of Bethlehem, Pa., after the steel plant there closed - though without a casino. John Callahan - who was mayor of Bethlehem for the last 10 years, when the Sands Casino was built around the abandoned steel plant there as part of an entertainment, retail, and housing complex - is now affiliated with a politically connected law firm whose principals want to invest in Burlington's desolate waterfront.
REAL_ESTATE
July 20, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I don't think I'd be breaking any new ground if I said there seems to be a lot of multifamily - read that, rental - development underway here and elsewhere. There are a number of reasons for this. First is that lenders, scalded when the for-sale market nosedived in 2007, saw a shift from buyers to renters in the next several years and decided that apartments were the places to put their money. It was not an overnight decision, banks being what they are. Developer Carl Dranoff, who was moving 777 S. Broad Street from drawing board to foundation in 2009, has said that he had to put more of his own money into that ultimately very successful luxury rental project, which this spring begat SouthStar Lofts, a few blocks north at Broad and South.
REAL_ESTATE
June 9, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
When we last met up with Jeffrey Tubbs, he was two years into his first building project and doing well, though it was 2010 and we were still mired in the real estate downturn. Four years later, Tubbs is still small and successful but growing, combining youth - he's 37 - with enthusiasm. Part of his success stems from building for-sale housing the next address up from "the hot neighborhood" - in this case, Northern Liberties. We're seeing a lot of activity like that in Philadelphia these days, although much of it is rental as developers large and small retrench after squeezing through sales gates as they were closing shut.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A mixed-use affordable-housing development is moving forward in Norristown despite opposition from some residents. The plan calls for 96 one- and two-bedroom apartments, as well as 5,000 square feet of retail space, at DeKalb and Airy Streets. Sixty units would be reserved for low- and moderate-income residents. The site is now a parking lot owned by Montgomery County. The county deemed it underused, and in February agreed to transfer ownership through a profit-sharing redevelopment deal.
TRAVEL
October 7, 2012 | James F. Lee, Washington Post
Tucked into a corner of the wall above a stairway leading to the third floor of the Corbit-Sharp House in Odessa, Del., is a tiny doorway. In 1845, the cubbyhole behind this door sheltered a runaway slave named Sam. When the local sheriff came looking for the runaway, the lady of the house, Mary Corbit, led him right up to the stairway. As she had hoped, the sheriff couldn't imagine that the space behind the door was large enough to shelter a human being, so he turned away to continue his search throughout the rest of the house.
NEWS
March 21, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles H. Diamond, 76, of New Hope, executive director of the Bucks County Housing and Development Corp., died of pulmonary fibrosis Saturday, March 17, at home. For the last decade, Mr. Diamond headed the nonprofit corporation, which manages 26 properties housing low- and moderate-income families. Previously, he had been director of La Salle University Bucks County Center, the extension campus in Newtown, headed training at Crown Cork & Seal, and was an administrator for Holy Redeemer Health Systems.
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