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Housing Discrimination

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NEWS
January 8, 1987 | By Paul Baker, Special to The Inquirer
Four fair-housing groups have been designated by the Delaware County Council to fight housing discrimination in the county. The groups, known as the Fair Housing Consortium, are to teach county residents what constitutes discrimination in housing and what remedies are available. A five-year plan was developed by the New Horizons Housing Opportunity Task Force, a 17-member board appointed by the County Council in May 1985 in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
SPORTS
August 8, 2006 | Daily News staff and wire reports
The U.S. Department of Justice yesterday sued Los Angeles Clippers owner and real estate mogul Donald Sterling for housing discrimination, claiming he refused to rent apartments to blacks and families with children. Federal prosecutors contend that Sterling, his wife, Rochelle, and their family trust refused to rent to many prospective tenants, treated them poorly and misrepresented the availability of apartments to them in the city's Koreatown section. The defendants also are accused of refusing to rent to black prospective tenants in Beverly Hills as well as families with children looking to rent apartments that the defendants owned or managed in Los Angeles County.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1994 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia Newspapers Inc. and the Tenants' Action Group of Philadelphia yesterday announced a joint campaign to end housing discrimination in the region. The announcement was made by officials of the tenants' group and its Fair Housing Action Center and Charles Fancher, vice president/communication and public affairs for PNI, which publishes The Inquirer and the Philadelphia Daily News. The campaign is designed to educate the public and the real estate community about laws that prohibit housing discrimination, TAG and PNI officials said.
NEWS
April 28, 1993 | BY TIM KEARNEY
April is National Fair Housing month. How many readers know that Philadelphia is the fourth most segregated urban county in the United States? According to 1990 census figures, 30 percent of the nation's African- American people lived in predominantly African-American neighborhoods, while in Philadelphia, 72 percent of African-American people live in neigjborhoods that are predominantly African-American. In the 25 years since the passage of the national Fair Housing Act, Philadelphia has become progressively more racially and ethnically segregated.
NEWS
July 14, 2004 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 35 years after the federal government made housing discrimination illegal, finding a place to live still means a battle against bias for millions of Americans. The distressing reality, said Melvin Alston, a North Carolina real estate agent on the NAACP's housing committee, is that "housing discrimination is alive and well. " The Washington-based National Fair Housing Alliance estimates that at least 3.7 million violations occur annually. While the post-9/11 housing market has grown ever more hostile toward those of Arab descent, African Americans experience more discrimination than any minority, reporting about 1.7 million cases a year.
NEWS
February 13, 1998 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chester County's Office of Housing and Community Development is scrutinizing several municipal zoning laws to see if they lead to housing discrimination, said Barbara Wilson, director of the office. Wilson made the announcement during a fair housing conference her office hosted yesterday at the Government Services Center. Panelists included just about every local, state and federal agency that deals in housing discrimination complaints. Many of the people who attended deal with housing issues.
NEWS
February 23, 2006
DURING Black History Month, we celebrate the many accomplishments of African-Americans across the nation. And it is with great sadness that we grieve the loss of the first lady of civil rights, Coretta Scott King. Let us not forget the legacy she and her husband advanced throughout their lives - one of equality for all Americans. While we have made great strides in the civil-rights arena, the sad reality is that discrimination still exists, even in housing. At times, the perpetrators can be so cunning that the majority of those discriminated against aren't even aware that it has occurred.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1994 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
The newspaper advertisement was more likely to solicit giggles than anger. "Christian handyman wanted as tenant," it read, bringing to mind a stiff- necked Bible thumper. Yet, it was no laughing matter for Tim Kearney, director of the Philadelphia Fair Housing Action Center. The ad was one of many that Kearney and his staff had observed in the Daily News and The Philadelphia Inquirer. And each violated the federal Fair Housing Act, they said. So, Kearney and members of the Tenant Action Group took their beef to Philadelphia Newspapers Inc., which publishes the papers.
REAL_ESTATE
October 4, 1992 | By David I. Turner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it comes to housing discrimination, Realtors say they've gone from being part of the problem to being part of the solution. Years ago, real estate salespeople would typically follow the wishes of the neighborhoods, steering some racial groups away from buying homes in certain areas while encouraging others. But then came federal fair-housing laws. And state and local statutes designed to halt housing discrimination. Slowly, practices began to change, though no one, not even the Realtors, will tell you that everyone today strictly adheres to those laws.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | By Marc Freeman, Special to The Inquirer
Homosexual residents of State College will continue to live without protection from housing discrimination because of the borough government's recent failure to enact a fair housing ordinance. On July 3, despite the threat of a veto by Mayor Arnold Addison, the seven- member borough council narrowly adopted an ordinance that paralleled state and federal laws but included no protection for homosexuals or poor people. As promised, the mayor vetoed the bill because he said he wanted an ordinance that protected all residents.
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NEWS
July 17, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Echoing the sentiments of Presidents Obama and Clinton, who had spoken before her, U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch closed out the NAACP's national convention Wednesday with calls to reform America's justice system, proclaiming that "law enforcement can protect communities without breaking them. " In her 25-minute speech before hundreds at the Convention Center, Lynch praised the country's civil-rights accomplishments, citing among others her father's efforts in 1960s North Carolina, but described the need to press on and "root out the injustice that confines liberty.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Though the U.S. Supreme Court agreed Monday to take on the Mount Holly housing discrimination case, some lawyers involved say that settlement talks have turned serious and that it may become moot for the justices to step in. For the first time, after five years of litigation, both sides are scheduled to sit together Thursday with federal Magistrate Judge Joel Schneider in Camden to discuss resolving the case. That includes about 20 low-income African American and Hispanic households that sued the township in 2008, claiming the town's plan to demolish their rowhouses in the Mount Holly Gardens and replace them with market-rate housing was discriminatory.
NEWS
May 14, 2013
There is no doubt that many New Jersey towns have dragged their feet on spending affordable-housing funds. But that doesn't give the Christie administration the right to seize millions intended to help more families afford homes. Between $150 million and $200 million in housing money is thought to be at risk if Gov. Christie is allowed to have his way with municipalities' affordable-housing trust funds. That's enough to build or renovate more than 3,000 homes. Lawmakers should block Christie's maneuver by passing legislation to give towns more time to use the money.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Gov. Christie should be ashamed of his despicable effort to take millions of dollars from a fund that New Jersey towns set aside to help pay for more affordable housing in one of the nation's most expensive states to have a home.   Christie wants to take as much as $161 million from the New Jersey Housing Trust Fund to help him balance the $31.7 billion state budget he signed last month. Given his poor record, Christie's claim that the funds would be used for other housing programs seems unlikely.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Nearly 70 percent of the nation's community-based organizations say housing discrimination continues unabated, especially against immigrants, disabled people, and families with children, results of a recent survey indicate. Nearly 550 community groups surveyed in April by the nonprofit advocacy organization Consumer Action said that most of those facing discrimination are unsure of their rights and how to protect themselves. At a news conference sponsored by Consumer Action in Washington, D.C., Thursday, John Chin, executive director of the Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corp., said many of those facing discrimination often aren't even aware of it, owing to their limited proficiency in English.
SPORTS
August 8, 2006 | Daily News staff and wire reports
The U.S. Department of Justice yesterday sued Los Angeles Clippers owner and real estate mogul Donald Sterling for housing discrimination, claiming he refused to rent apartments to blacks and families with children. Federal prosecutors contend that Sterling, his wife, Rochelle, and their family trust refused to rent to many prospective tenants, treated them poorly and misrepresented the availability of apartments to them in the city's Koreatown section. The defendants also are accused of refusing to rent to black prospective tenants in Beverly Hills as well as families with children looking to rent apartments that the defendants owned or managed in Los Angeles County.
NEWS
February 23, 2006
DURING Black History Month, we celebrate the many accomplishments of African-Americans across the nation. And it is with great sadness that we grieve the loss of the first lady of civil rights, Coretta Scott King. Let us not forget the legacy she and her husband advanced throughout their lives - one of equality for all Americans. While we have made great strides in the civil-rights arena, the sad reality is that discrimination still exists, even in housing. At times, the perpetrators can be so cunning that the majority of those discriminated against aren't even aware that it has occurred.
NEWS
September 29, 2004 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An investigation into a housing discrimination complaint against a major Republican campaign contributor has ended in a settlement, the Fair Housing Council of Montgomery County has announced. The complaint against North Crossing Apartments stirred up last year's county commissioners race when the two Democratic candidates accused Republican Commissioner James Matthews of quashing the investigation against his friend, Harold Rosen, owner of the apartments. The Fair Housing Council had accused North Crossing of telling women with children that certain apartments were unavailable when they in fact were.
NEWS
July 14, 2004 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 35 years after the federal government made housing discrimination illegal, finding a place to live still means a battle against bias for millions of Americans. The distressing reality, said Melvin Alston, a North Carolina real estate agent on the NAACP's housing committee, is that "housing discrimination is alive and well. " The Washington-based National Fair Housing Alliance estimates that at least 3.7 million violations occur annually. While the post-9/11 housing market has grown ever more hostile toward those of Arab descent, African Americans experience more discrimination than any minority, reporting about 1.7 million cases a year.
NEWS
January 16, 2004 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is expected to announce grants today totalling $1.4 million to nonprofit groups whose fair housing efforts mirror the legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The federal agency will dispense the money under its Fair Housing Initiatives Program to three agencies in Eastern Pennsylvania. The Fair Housing Council of Montgomery County in Glenside will receive $206,489 to enforce fair-housing laws for immigrants, minorities and disabled people.
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