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Howard Pyle

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NEWS
November 20, 2011 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Howard Pyle's considerable artistic legacy includes, besides a noteworthy group of classic illustrations, the Brandywine School of painting and the Delaware Art Museum. Not bad for a man who usually is omitted from lists of important American artists. As a teacher, the Wilmington native nurtured an impressive cohort of followers, including N.C. Wyeth (who subsequently produced his own line of succession), Frank Schoonover, and Philadelphian Jessie Willcox Smith. The Delaware Art Museum traces its beginning to 1912, shortly after Pyle, born in 1853, died at age 58 while traveling in Italy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1994 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Norman Rockwell is probably the most popular illustrator America has produced. Howard Pyle, no less talented, comes in a close second because, unlike Rockwell, he created illustrations for books, not for the mass media. Pyle (1853-1911) was the first American illustrator of stature; he made the profession respectable. Rockwell (1894-1978) became an American institution through the 322 covers he created for the Saturday Evening Post. A museum exhibition that brings them together in a compare-and-contrast format seems a sure way to attract a crowd.
NEWS
December 4, 1994 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Brandywine Valley is Howard Pyle and Wyeth country. So accustomed are we to hearing Howard Pyle linked with the Wilmington and Chadds Ford area, it's surprising to see this late-19th century illustrator featured in a twin- bill exhibition with a generation-younger illustrator, Norman Rockwell. Delaware Art Museum is presenting this show as a more natural fit, I suppose, than Brandywine River Museum would have provided. After all, it's a question of who is the rightful heir, artistically, to Pyle, the granddaddy of American illustration.
NEWS
April 12, 1998 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Vincent Van Gogh was a fan of Howard Pyle. He used to clip and save illustrations by that prolific American artist from London magazines. Pyle died in 1911 at age 58, and a year later the Delaware Art Museum was founded in Wilmington as a repository for the originals of those and many other illustrations by that gifted native son. Artistry in depth by Pyle and his students is today the cornerstone of that museum's collection, which, although it...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | By Victoria Donohoe FOR THE INQUIRER
Move over, Norman Rockwell. Ellen B.T. Pyle also did her share of celebrated Saturday Evening Post covers. The American public loved her work, and Pyle (1876-1936) even received a fan letter from Rockwell. Delaware Art Museum is presenting the first overview of the career of Ellen Bernard Thompson Pyle in a show of 50 works, "Illustrating Her World. " Its book-length catalog is a page-turner. And while much of the featured artwork has been loaned by family members, it is hoped that more might come to light because of the display.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2012
Art Museums & Institutions African American Heritage Museum 661 Jackson Rd., Newtonville, NJ; 609-704-5495. www.aahmsnj.org . Tue.-Fri. 10 am-3 pm. Brandywine River Museum Rte. 1 & Rte. 100, Chadds Ford; 610-388-2700. www.brandywinemuseum.org . Brandywine Heritage Galleries. Andrew Wyeth Gallery. N.C. Wyeth Gallery. Bayard & Mary Sharp Gallery. Comic Catharsis: A Gift of Cartoons by William Steig. Closes 3/11. $10; $6 seniors, students & children 6-12; free under 6. Daily 9:30 am-4:30 pm. Chemical Heritage Foundation 315 Chestnut St.; 215-925-2178.
NEWS
November 24, 1994 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You could call it a topographic mural, but that's not quite right. It looks artistic, but art isn't the main purpose. It's sort of informational, but none of the landmarks are labeled. Best, perhaps, to stick with the way H. William Sellers, director of the Brandywine Conservancy, described the new exhibit at the Brandywine River Musem: "It's a regional bulletin board of environmental issues. " The exhibit consists of a 7-by-24-foot panel inside the museum. It shows the topography of Southeastern Pennsylvania and its watersheds in three- dimensional overlays.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1987 | By Victoria Donohoe, Special to The Inquirer
Sarah McEneaney's style is dialect to art's language. She is regarded by some as an "urban naif," yet McEneaney's allegiance to "high" art is real. She is a dedicated painter trained at two of this city's major art schools. Still, one suspects she's using the "sophisticated primitive" approach to make sly comments on the trendy, sophisticated painting of today. At times she makes affectionate digs at the art going on around her; at other moments she makes more unfriendly ones. Yet her vision of culture seems fairly optimistic.
NEWS
August 13, 1988 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
A retrospective look at work by two early-20th-century American book- illustrators is scarcely an original idea for an art exhibit. The field has been repeatedly examined, both sketchily and in depth, and will continue to be, especially at the Brandywine River Museum, which specializes in American illustration. The Brandywine's current exhibition features illustrations by Henry C. Pitz (1895-1976), who belonged to the Brandywine regional tradition, and Arthur I. Keller (1866-1924)
NEWS
September 15, 2002 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
We have to give him credit. Illustrator N.C. Wyeth was at the very least trying to come to terms with American mass production and commercialism - that is, with what might be called the mechanized sublime. So Brandywine River Museum's new show, "N.C. Wyeth Arrives in Wilmington," celebrating the 100th anniversary of that artist's arrival in our region from Massachusetts, seems right on target in its focus on business and technology aspects of magazine illustration at the turn of the last century.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Art museums are paying more than the usual attention to illustration this season, and an exhibition called "State of the Art" at the Delaware Art Museum suggests why this might be so. Easy to assimilate and intermittently entertaining, the show aims to bring us up to date on how this often-maligned and ignored genre has changed since the days of Howard Pyle, king of American illustrators a century ago. "State of the Art" is also quirky and...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012
Art Museums & Institutions African American Heritage Museum 661 Jackson Rd., Newtonville, NJ; 609-704-5495. www.aahmsnj.org . 101 Quilts. Donations accepted. Closes 12/15. Tue.-Fri. 10 am-3 pm. The Barnes Foundation - Philadelphia 2025 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-278-7000. www.barnesfoundation.org . $18; $15 seniors 65 and over; $10 students and 17 and under. Sat.-Mon., Wed.-Thu. 9:30 am-6 pm; Fri. 9:30 am-10 pm. Brandywine River Museum Rte. 1 & Rte. 100, Chadds Ford; 610-388-2700.
NEWS
November 20, 2011 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Howard Pyle's considerable artistic legacy includes, besides a noteworthy group of classic illustrations, the Brandywine School of painting and the Delaware Art Museum. Not bad for a man who usually is omitted from lists of important American artists. As a teacher, the Wilmington native nurtured an impressive cohort of followers, including N.C. Wyeth (who subsequently produced his own line of succession), Frank Schoonover, and Philadelphian Jessie Willcox Smith. The Delaware Art Museum traces its beginning to 1912, shortly after Pyle, born in 1853, died at age 58 while traveling in Italy.
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