CollectionsHoward Stern Show
IN THE NEWS

Howard Stern Show

FEATURED ARTICLES
LIVING
May 19, 1993 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story includes information from the Washington Post, New York Times, New York Daily News and USA Today
Howard Stern's bosses at Infinity Broadcasting Co. could be out a lot of dough. A federal judge told Infinity yesterday that the FCC acted fairly in December when it fined the company $606,000 for remarks the jock made between Oct. 30 and Dec. 6, 1991, on Infinity stations in New York, Manassas, Va., and WYSP-FM (94.1) in these parts. (Another chain that carries Stern, Greater Media Inc., was fined $105,000. They're contesting, too.) Infinity and various consumer and civil liberties groups had argued that the pending fines and threat of more were the FCC's way of "browbeating" broadcasters into self-censorship.
NEWS
October 19, 1996 | By Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It might have been just a symbolic gesture when radio host Howard Stern offered yesterday morning to endorse whichever candidate in New Jersey's bare-knuckled Senate race called his show first. A nod of respect, perhaps, from the Don of Dirty-Talk to two expert mudslingers, Democrat Bob Torricelli and Republican Dick Zimmer. The punch line: Within minutes, both candidates were on the line. Zimmer called from his car. Torricelli said he had just driven "60 miles per hour through red lights" to reach a phone.
NEWS
July 16, 1992 | Daily News Staff Report Staff writer Jonathan Takiff and the Associated Press contributed to this report
It was high-minded morals that cost veteran DJ Michael Tearson his recently acquired weekend air slot on WYSP, he claims, but it was just plain money that cost Howard Stern his TV show. Tearson, who had been a longtime jock at WMMR (93.3-FM), said he refused to participate in a Stern-gunning of WMMR's John DeBella, whose divorce the professional sleaze made fun of in a "divorce party" June 19. Tearson said his stance earned him the ire of Stern and the "Sternoids," rabid Stern fans, who set out to make Tearson's air life hell and complained to WYSP (94.1-FM)
BUSINESS
December 16, 2005 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Larry DiAngelus, for one, is sad to see Howard Stern wrap up his run on the public airwaves today as he prepares to jump next month to satellite radio. The lawyer from Media, a specialist in "driver's license restoration," has been an advertiser on the Howard Stern Show on WYSP-FM (94.1) in Philadelphia. "His market is our market: bad drivers," DiAngelus said. Young men, in other words. Stern holds a commanding lead among male listeners ages 25 to 54 in the Philadelphia market.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2012 | By Dan Gross
IT'S THE ENGAGEMENT of the century. Meteorologist John Bolaris and Erica Smitheman , his girlfriend of a year-and-a-half, were engaged on Monday's Howard Stern Show. Bolaris, 55, and Smitheman, 33, who works in flooring sales, were in-studio on Stern's SiriusXM satellite-radio program, on which Bolaris serves this week as the official meteorologist covering Hurricane Sandy. After interviewing Smitheman about her relationship with Bolaris, including how long it took her to sleep with him after they met (her reply: "three hours")
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2012 | Dan Gross
COMEDIAN ARTIE LANGE has yet to discuss publicly his January 2010 suicide attempt but hopes to do so on the Howard Stern Show in November, when his book Crash and Burn is released. Lange, who spent nine years on the Stern show, performs stand-up Saturday at the Tower Theatre with Nick DiPaolo, his partner on the syndicated "Nick and Artie" sports-talk show which airs 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. weeknights on 610 WIP. Tickets are still available. "I think I'm at the place where I can do it. It would be a heavy thing," says Lange about a hoped-for Stern visit.
NEWS
December 17, 2005 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An era has come to an end - not with a bang, or a whimper, but with gastrointestinal noises and dirty jokes. Shock jock, loving philanthropist and sex symbol Howard Stern yesterday bade adieu to his fans on his last show on terrestrial radio. After 20 years as a radio titan with a syndicated show that drew 12 mil daily listeners, Stern is making the leap of faith to satellite radio. Starting Jan. 9, the man who made horny into its own art form will transmit his schtick on Sirius Satellite Radio.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
Richard Lewis escapes from his neurotic life for a half-hour each week to become Marty Gold, an anxiety-ridden writer in the hit sitcom Anything But Love. But after making the career move from stand-up comedian to successful television actor, Lewis recognizes that he is his strongest character - the helpless Jewish neurotic whom fans know from Late Night With David Letterman, The Howard Stern Show and several HBO specials. Lewis will reveal his deep-seated Freudian complexes during his stand-up therapy at 8 p.m. Friday at the Valley Forge Music Fair.
NEWS
July 1, 1986 | By Gail Shister, Inquirer Staff Writer (David Walstad contributed to this article.)
The weekend edition of Channel 29's Ten O'Clock News - not scheduled to debut until September - got a head start Saturday, thanks to the Phillies. As the team's 17-inning game against the Cardinals dragged on into the wee hours, copy was quickly rewritten to reflect the time change. When the dust had finally cleared, Friday's Ten O'Clock News had become Saturday's One- Twenty News. "We were starting to feel pretty dingy," said assistant news director Henry Bonilla. Sports anchor "Howard Eskin began a monologue to keep us entertained.
NEWS
January 6, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
"He's so cute," shouts Marisa Rosenstock, a 25-year-old student from Center City. "I love him so much. " "I wouldn't miss a second of him," says Courtney Ray, a 24-year-old merchandiser from Norristown. They, along with more than 600 others - Rocky Balboa impersonators included - are swooning over the best-selling author. But it's not Malcolm Gladwell or John Grogan they've come to see. Despite warnings from security not to touch the star, the throng strains to touch, hug, kiss.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
THE FIRST gig comedian Artie Lange did after his very public meltdown - it included quitting his gig on the Howard Stern Show on air and surviving a suicide attempt due to his heroin addiction - was at the Borgata in Atlantic City. Lange has always done well in the area. "You better be good at what you do, because [Philadelphians] don't tolerate it if you're not," Lange told me from his apartment in Hoboken, N.J. "It's a good place to test my stuff, because you won't tolerate bull----.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2012 | By Dan Gross
IT'S THE ENGAGEMENT of the century. Meteorologist John Bolaris and Erica Smitheman , his girlfriend of a year-and-a-half, were engaged on Monday's Howard Stern Show. Bolaris, 55, and Smitheman, 33, who works in flooring sales, were in-studio on Stern's SiriusXM satellite-radio program, on which Bolaris serves this week as the official meteorologist covering Hurricane Sandy. After interviewing Smitheman about her relationship with Bolaris, including how long it took her to sleep with him after they met (her reply: "three hours")
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2012 | By Dan Gross
SIXERS CO-OWNER Marc Leder , at whose Florida home Mitt Romney remarked that 47 percent of the nation "believe that they are victims," is known to throw wild parties in the Hamptons, reports the New York Post . The paper says "guests cavorted in a pool and performed sex acts, while scantily clad Russian women danced on platforms," at a rented home in Bridgehampton, N.Y., during a summer bash last year. The Post said Leder went on something of a tear after his wife of 22 years, Lisa , cheated on him with her tennis instructor in 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2012 | Dan Gross
COMEDIAN ARTIE LANGE has yet to discuss publicly his January 2010 suicide attempt but hopes to do so on the Howard Stern Show in November, when his book Crash and Burn is released. Lange, who spent nine years on the Stern show, performs stand-up Saturday at the Tower Theatre with Nick DiPaolo, his partner on the syndicated "Nick and Artie" sports-talk show which airs 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. weeknights on 610 WIP. Tickets are still available. "I think I'm at the place where I can do it. It would be a heavy thing," says Lange about a hoped-for Stern visit.
NEWS
January 6, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
"He's so cute," shouts Marisa Rosenstock, a 25-year-old student from Center City. "I love him so much. " "I wouldn't miss a second of him," says Courtney Ray, a 24-year-old merchandiser from Norristown. They, along with more than 600 others - Rocky Balboa impersonators included - are swooning over the best-selling author. But it's not Malcolm Gladwell or John Grogan they've come to see. Despite warnings from security not to touch the star, the throng strains to touch, hug, kiss.
NEWS
December 17, 2005 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An era has come to an end - not with a bang, or a whimper, but with gastrointestinal noises and dirty jokes. Shock jock, loving philanthropist and sex symbol Howard Stern yesterday bade adieu to his fans on his last show on terrestrial radio. After 20 years as a radio titan with a syndicated show that drew 12 mil daily listeners, Stern is making the leap of faith to satellite radio. Starting Jan. 9, the man who made horny into its own art form will transmit his schtick on Sirius Satellite Radio.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2005 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Larry DiAngelus, for one, is sad to see Howard Stern wrap up his run on the public airwaves today as he prepares to jump next month to satellite radio. The lawyer from Media, a specialist in "driver's license restoration," has been an advertiser on the Howard Stern Show on WYSP-FM (94.1) in Philadelphia. "His market is our market: bad drivers," DiAngelus said. Young men, in other words. Stern holds a commanding lead among male listeners ages 25 to 54 in the Philadelphia market.
NEWS
October 19, 1996 | By Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It might have been just a symbolic gesture when radio host Howard Stern offered yesterday morning to endorse whichever candidate in New Jersey's bare-knuckled Senate race called his show first. A nod of respect, perhaps, from the Don of Dirty-Talk to two expert mudslingers, Democrat Bob Torricelli and Republican Dick Zimmer. The punch line: Within minutes, both candidates were on the line. Zimmer called from his car. Torricelli said he had just driven "60 miles per hour through red lights" to reach a phone.
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Children watching fairy tales on the Nickelodeon channel will no longer have to ponder which of several bikini-clad women draped around Howard Stern on television is actually a man. That question is posed on a promotional ad that has been airing during afternoon cartoons broadcast through the Suburban Cable Co. The spots were to be pulled from children's programming by early this morning, according to officials at Cable AdNet of Philadelphia, which...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1993 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Because (Howard) Stern learned to get along in a shaming family environment. . . he successfully re-creates this pattern on his show. He causes trouble on the air, where no one can talk back to him and he can control the microphone and telephone, but underneath he still fears the shame and humiliation of his childhood. - A psychotherapist's analysis of Howard Stern in "Private Parts" If a highly trained, mental-health professional wrote that about you, would you lock it away in a safe-deposit box or print it in a book for all your fans and enemies to read?
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|