CollectionsHowl
IN THE NEWS

Howl

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 5, 1987 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Staff Writer
A Hollywood casting agent gets an early morning call from the East Coast. She excuses herself to get some coffee. Then she snorts two lines of cocaine and downs a shot of bourbon. "OK, Arnie," she says, returning to the phone. "I'm awake now. " That's just one very funny moment in the very funny "Drinking in America," a one-woman play by Eric Bogosian that opened last night at Theater Center Philadelphia. The comedy, a compilation of 10 quick-hit skits, demands that Patricia Langford play a myriad of roles, from a hobo to a Baptist preacher to a suburban matron.
SPORTS
October 6, 1989 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Sports Columnist
Mike LaCoss wants the wind to howl tomorrow night, when he starts the third game of the National League playoffs for the Giants. He wants the wind to screech and the Candlestick Park crowd to cheer. He won't be happy with one out of two, but if he had to choose, he'd pick a howling wind and a hostile crowd. "They boo me when I work the count to 3-and-2," the big redhead sighed before last night's game. "The playoff atmosphere may change things, I hope. Some of those season ticketholders will be way out, in the upper decks.
LIVING
March 12, 2000 | By Alex Richmond, FOR THE INQUIRER
It may not be every woman's fantasy to be surrounded by gyrating, nearly naked men - most women want their men to clean the bathroom or pick up after themselves without being asked. But a nightclub dedicated to flaunting bathroom-scrubbing men wouldn't be much fun, would it? So the Cave (on Delaware Avenue near Spring Garden Street) has filled the role by giving women a wicked night out with buff, handsome men, all more than willing to get their groove on just for fun. For a $10 cover, women can enjoy a floor show featuring an Army guy, a cowboy, or a regular suit-and-tie guy. A specialty of the house is a lap dance.
NEWS
November 26, 1993 | By Maura Webber, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Gloucester County's first and only bomb-detecting canine is howling mad. Until this fall, Zeus was pretty content with police work that consisted of the sundown-to-sunup chore of helping transport prisoners, followed by an early morning bomb check through the three-story courthouse on Hunter Street. Then his master messed everything up. Sheriff's officer Leonard Oullette began working the day shift in the courthouse, ushering prosecutors, defense attorneys, victims and defendants through the court's metal detector.
NEWS
October 7, 2005 | By Thomas Devaney
Fifty years ago tonight, the 29-year-old poet Allen Ginsberg was fourth to read in a group of five unknown (in this case, all men) poets at a converted garage turned art gallery on Fillmore Street in San Francisco. These are the first words of a new poem Ginsberg read that night: I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked That first line, and this first reading of Howl at the Six Gallery on Oct. 7, 1955, caused a stir that has yet to settle.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Architecturally, Howl's moving castle resembles the prow of a galleon jutting from an immense shingled cauldron perched atop chicken feet. A bay window shaped like a shark's mouth smiles menacingly from its face, a mermaid tail wags from its rear. The marching mansion is part building, part beast, accommodating as many moods as it does species and styles. Howl's Moving Castle is as eerie, bewitching and fantastic a film as it is an abode. In this fever dream from animation master Hayao Miyazaki (who adapted the 1986 young-adult book by Diana Wynne Jones)
NEWS
December 31, 1999 | By Cassie MacDonald
O heart green acre sown with salt by the departing occupier James Merrill Odometer turning with a long coo of wonder Omega meeting Alpha Ode to our scarred century, torn and mended O heart O wolf's tender belly, a gathering howl O yes you feel it Once you Opened to the history we made, the light we broke Only the end of time could darken its knowing, hopeful smile O fire and flood ...
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
During her first semester at Bryn Mawr College, Karen Tolchin wanted to be anywhere but there. With forum after forum on controversial issues at the prestigous women's college, "it was a politically tense year," Tolchin, 19, said last week. "It was a tough introduction to this school. " But as a sophomore this year, she couldn't be dragged away from the institution, thanks to encouragement from her parents, a lighter outlook on college and a special endeavor. Tolchin and several other students have created a satire magazine, The Howl, that takes a humorous look at Bryn Mawr women, college life along the Main Line, dating, roaches, parental relations and the world in general.
NEWS
April 20, 1986 | By Edward Power, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has been three decades since Allen Ginsberg wrote in his poem Howl about seeing the best minds of his generation "destroyed by madness. " In 30 years, the society that Ginsberg raged against, cursed and even affectionately embraced in his verse has, like the poet himself, changed a lot. But Ginsberg - his poems now widely anthologized, the poet himself venerated and on the verge of turning 60 - retains some of his old rage. And he has an opinion about what is happening to the best minds of America's younger generation.
LIVING
April 7, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Allen Ginsberg, the Beat Generation icon and tireless counterculture guru who died at 70 Saturday, led the most public of poetic lives. For four decades, Ginsberg maintained a hyperactive, agitating presence in American popular culture. The influence of the Paterson, N.J.-raised son of a schoolteacher-poet father and Russian-emigre Marxist mother went far beyond the realm of poetry and literature. His angry and profane poem "Howl" began a celebrated career as a constant advocate of free speech, and sexual and artistic liberation.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a move that made defense lawyers protest, a Philadelphia judge on Thursday agreed to postpone until June 10 the trial of 10 people arrested in a melee at a March town-hall meeting attended by District Attorney Seth Williams and Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey. Municipal Court Judge Joyce O. Eubanks granted the request by Assistant District Attorney Pam Conner, who said she needed more time to prepare for the disorderly conduct trial. Conner said she was only recently notified of the nonjury trial's scheduling, and needed time to interview police and at least one civilian witness to the March 19 incident.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE BUCKET-SHOP swindler whose story is told in "The Wolf of Wall Street" is now a "motivational" speaker, but he's got nothing on Martin Scorsese. Though conceived as a put-down of Wall Street excess, Scorsese's new movie is almost certain to recruit new blood to our ongoing bull-market bender. I'm not sure what the director had in mind, but his images send a definitive message: If you are possessed of ambition, drive and moral flexibility, you too can have Lamborghinis and yachts and snort cocaine from the bums of hookers (the first thing you see in the prologue, so don't say you weren't warned)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2013
LIFE IS A CYCLE. When you're born they baby you. As a toddler they teach you. As a teen they tolerate you. As an adult they work you. Things usually regress from there. And for those of us with kids, things go backward pretty quickly. Kids, you see, are the instruments by which we measure how far we've fallen. When we forget our glasses and our kids remind us, we've simply tripped. When we walk out the door without pants, however, that's a full-blown Chevy Chase pratfall, and it's time for the kids to run our lives.
NEWS
October 24, 2012
The remains of Tropical Storm Sandy could rock the Philadelphia region with flooding rains, high winds, and beach-erasing waves early next week, the National Weather Service warned Tuesday. "Our region could be close to the path of a very dangerous storm," Gary Szatkowski, chief meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Mount Holly, said in a briefing to emergency managers. Computer models are far from settling on a course for the storm, still deep in the Caribbean on Tuesday.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Juliana Reyes
TOWARD the end of April, Elizabeth Simmons got three violation notices — for infractions committed on three dates, beginning in December — from Licenses and Inspections. The violations cited "unfit structures" in her house, such as a collapsed roof and walls, and said that if Simmons didn't demolish the house, the city would do so and charge her. Simmons was shocked. Her roof and walls were just fine. She quickly realized the city's mistake: The address listed on the violations, in North Philadelphia, was nowhere near her home in Southwest Philly.
NEWS
April 4, 2012 | BY JULIANA REYES
PHILADELPHIANS are tired of the illegal "bandit" signs that pop up on utility poles around the city, screaming "We Buy Houses!" or "Cash 4 Junk Cars. " On Monday, the Daily News reported about one citizen who's taking matters into his own hands by tearing them down. But city government is (finally) trying to find a solution, too. The Nutter administration has been working on a new strategy to fight the obnoxious signs. The plan is two-fold, said Brian Abernathy, chief of staff to the managing director: ramp up enforcement with a staff dedicated to tracking down offenders, and get city agencies to focus on taking the signs down.
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | By JULIANA REYES
A FEW MONTHS ago we told you the strange story of some Fishtown folks who had fenced off the sidewalk adjacent to their property, essentially making the sidewalk part of their side yard. The sidewalk had been fenced off for years, neighbors said, and it still is. The neighbors were upset, and wondered how someone could take control of what they thought was public property. It turns out that this particular sidewalk isn't public property. The city turned the street that it's on, East Hewson Street, into private property years ago. Yes, the city can give a street to private property owners.
NEWS
March 21, 2012 | BY JULIANA REYES
IF YOU'RE riding SEPTA's Regional Rail, here's hoping you're light and limber - and prepared to make a small leap to the platform at your stop. Disgruntled riders of the Trenton line have told us that their commute regularly involves minor acrobatics. Here's what's going on: Most station platforms are old and aren't level with SEPTA's new trains. To deal with this, SEPTA installed boxes called "step-ups" to the platforms so passengers can step right off the train without a big drop.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|