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NEWS
February 14, 1989 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Amelia Earhart's airplane disappeared in the Pacific 51 years, seven months and 12 days ago. The globe-girdling flier put out her last radio call and vanished. She said, "We are on the line of position 157 dash 133; we are running north and south. " Then, nothing but dead airwaves that even a seven-ship flotilla from the U.S. Navy could not trace. Two aviation archaeologists, Richard R. Gillespie and Patricia Thrasher of Delaware, think they know where Earhart's Lockheed Electra went down - exactly.
NEWS
July 4, 2012 | By Oskar Garcia, Associated Press
HONOLULU - A $2.2 million expedition is hoping to solve one of America's most enduring mysteries: What exactly happened to famed aviator Amelia Earhart when she went missing over the South Pacific 75 years ago? A group of scientists, historians, and salvagers think they have a good idea. They left Honolulu on Tuesday for a remote island in the Pacific nation of Kiribati in hopes of finding wreckage of Earhart's Lockheed Electra plane. Their working theory is that Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, landed on a reef near the Kiribati atoll of Nikumaroro, then survived a short time.
NEWS
June 28, 1987 | By Catalina Ortiz, Associated Press
She was the first lady of the air, a daring, record-setting pilot, and on July 2, 1937, Amelia Earhart was nearing the end of a round-the-world flight, running low on fuel and aiming for a speck of land in the central Pacific. She never arrived on tiny Howland Island. A 17-day air and sea search discovered no trace of Earhart, navigator Fred Noonan or their Lockheed Electra. Officially, the plane and its passengers were lost at sea. But 50 years later, the flier's disappearance still fascinates and puzzles people.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Plane wreckage found on a remote island in the south Pacific Ocean last fall will be definitely linked to aviator Amelia Earhart's disappearance 55 years ago, experts who made the recovery said yesterday. Evidence establishing the link will be presented during a news conference tomorrow at the National Press Club in Washington, said Richard E. Gillespie, an aviation archaeologist and executive director of the Wilmington-based International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR)
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The next few weeks might finally reveal what happened to the Amelia Earhart's attempted round-the-world flight 75 years ago. A $2.2 million expedition to a remote Pacific island is on its way back to Hawaii after gathering "volumes of sonar data and many hours of high-definition video," according to Monday's online update from TIGHAR, the Delaware-based group that organized the search. "Did TIGHAR's Niku VII expedition find the Earhart aircraft? It's far too early to say," reads the latest report at www.tighar.org . "Big pieces of airplane wreckage were not immediately apparent, but after 75 years in Nikumaroro's severe and unstable underwater environment, that is hardly surprising.
NEWS
October 28, 1989 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Airplane archaeologists said yesterday that they had found old scraps of metal and new theories after scouring two guano-spattered South Pacific atolls that they think could hold Amelia Earhart's grave. A three-week search by the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recoveries (TIGHAR), which is based here, found no conclusive proof that the famed flier and her navigator died on Gardner Island or McKean Island, 650 miles north of American Samoa, said TIGHAR president Patricia Thrasher.
NEWS
September 1, 1990 | By Rich Henson, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of plane-wreck specialists from Wilmington says it is close to solving one of the most mystifying casualties of aviation history - the disappearance of Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan. Richard Gillespie, executive director of the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, says significant firsthand information was learned in recent weeks that buttresses the group's theory that Earhart's plane crashed 53 years ago on a Godforsaken atoll in the equatorial Pacific, 350 miles southeast of her planned destination.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
For most of the 25 years he's been investigating the disappearance of famed aviator Amelia Earhart, Ric Gillespie has gotten little traction. Experts and various self-proclaimed skeptics have dismissed, doubted, and debunked his theory that she and her navigator did not plunge into the vastness of the Pacific, but instead lived as castaways on a pinpoint of land called Nikumaroro. A smudge in a 74-year-old photograph turned everything around. A forensic analyst in Washington thought it looked more like an object than a photographic defect.
NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
This summer's $2.2 million search for Amelia Earhart's plane was about 2,000 miles off, if Australian David Billings is right. In 1945, an Australian army unit came across an engine in dense jungle on New Britain, a western Pacific island now part of Papua New Guinea. The aircraft engineer believes it was one of Earhart's engines because numbers handwritten on a map, supposedly by a member of that unit, correspond to an an engine from Earhart's Lockheed Model 10 Electra. The plane vanished in July 1937, as the famous flier and navigator Fred Noonan were over the Pacific, trying to finish up a round-the-world flight.
NEWS
March 21, 1992 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
The detectives have come back with their evidence. One rubber heel for a woman's size 9 shoe. A threaded top from a bottle that once held stomach medicine. A piece of aluminum skin from the fuselage of a pre-World War II plane. These artifacts are now offered up as proof that Amelia Earhart died on an inhospitable atoll in the South Pacific. The 39-year-old pilot and her navigator attempting to add yet another first to her list - the first pilot to circle the globe near the equator - missed Howland Island.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
This summer's $2.2 million search for Amelia Earhart's plane was about 2,000 miles off, if Australian David Billings is right. In 1945, an Australian army unit came across an engine in dense jungle on New Britain, a western Pacific island now part of Papua New Guinea. The aircraft engineer believes it was one of Earhart's engines because numbers handwritten on a map, supposedly by a member of that unit, correspond to an an engine from Earhart's Lockheed Model 10 Electra. The plane vanished in July 1937, as the famous flier and navigator Fred Noonan were over the Pacific, trying to finish up a round-the-world flight.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The next few weeks might finally reveal what happened to the Amelia Earhart's attempted round-the-world flight 75 years ago. A $2.2 million expedition to a remote Pacific island is on its way back to Hawaii after gathering "volumes of sonar data and many hours of high-definition video," according to Monday's online update from TIGHAR, the Delaware-based group that organized the search. "Did TIGHAR's Niku VII expedition find the Earhart aircraft? It's far too early to say," reads the latest report at www.tighar.org . "Big pieces of airplane wreckage were not immediately apparent, but after 75 years in Nikumaroro's severe and unstable underwater environment, that is hardly surprising.
NEWS
July 4, 2012 | By Oskar Garcia, Associated Press
HONOLULU - A $2.2 million expedition is hoping to solve one of America's most enduring mysteries: What exactly happened to famed aviator Amelia Earhart when she went missing over the South Pacific 75 years ago? A group of scientists, historians, and salvagers think they have a good idea. They left Honolulu on Tuesday for a remote island in the Pacific nation of Kiribati in hopes of finding wreckage of Earhart's Lockheed Electra plane. Their working theory is that Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, landed on a reef near the Kiribati atoll of Nikumaroro, then survived a short time.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
For most of the 25 years he's been investigating the disappearance of famed aviator Amelia Earhart, Ric Gillespie has gotten little traction. Experts and various self-proclaimed skeptics have dismissed, doubted, and debunked his theory that she and her navigator did not plunge into the vastness of the Pacific, but instead lived as castaways on a pinpoint of land called Nikumaroro. A smudge in a 74-year-old photograph turned everything around. A forensic analyst in Washington thought it looked more like an object than a photographic defect.
NEWS
December 5, 1998 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All he has are some scraps of a shoe and a copy of an old handwritten document describing some bones, but with the help of modern forensic analysis, Richard Gillespie said he was inching closer to solving one of the world's great puzzles - the disappearance of Amelia Earhart during her attempted around-the-world flight in 1937. Gillespie, who runs a Delaware-based organization devoted to historic aircraft, presented the latest leads in the case yesterday in Philadelphia during a meeting of the American Anthropology Association.
NEWS
March 21, 1992 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
The detectives have come back with their evidence. One rubber heel for a woman's size 9 shoe. A threaded top from a bottle that once held stomach medicine. A piece of aluminum skin from the fuselage of a pre-World War II plane. These artifacts are now offered up as proof that Amelia Earhart died on an inhospitable atoll in the South Pacific. The 39-year-old pilot and her navigator attempting to add yet another first to her list - the first pilot to circle the globe near the equator - missed Howland Island.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Plane wreckage found on a remote island in the south Pacific Ocean last fall will be definitely linked to aviator Amelia Earhart's disappearance 55 years ago, experts who made the recovery said yesterday. Evidence establishing the link will be presented during a news conference tomorrow at the National Press Club in Washington, said Richard E. Gillespie, an aviation archaeologist and executive director of the Wilmington-based International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR)
NEWS
September 1, 1990 | By Rich Henson, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of plane-wreck specialists from Wilmington says it is close to solving one of the most mystifying casualties of aviation history - the disappearance of Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan. Richard Gillespie, executive director of the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, says significant firsthand information was learned in recent weeks that buttresses the group's theory that Earhart's plane crashed 53 years ago on a Godforsaken atoll in the equatorial Pacific, 350 miles southeast of her planned destination.
NEWS
October 28, 1989 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Airplane archaeologists said yesterday that they had found old scraps of metal and new theories after scouring two guano-spattered South Pacific atolls that they think could hold Amelia Earhart's grave. A three-week search by the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recoveries (TIGHAR), which is based here, found no conclusive proof that the famed flier and her navigator died on Gardner Island or McKean Island, 650 miles north of American Samoa, said TIGHAR president Patricia Thrasher.
NEWS
February 14, 1989 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Amelia Earhart's airplane disappeared in the Pacific 51 years, seven months and 12 days ago. The globe-girdling flier put out her last radio call and vanished. She said, "We are on the line of position 157 dash 133; we are running north and south. " Then, nothing but dead airwaves that even a seven-ship flotilla from the U.S. Navy could not trace. Two aviation archaeologists, Richard R. Gillespie and Patricia Thrasher of Delaware, think they know where Earhart's Lockheed Electra went down - exactly.
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