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Hula

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NEWS
September 26, 1995 | By Shawna McCoy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Rapid drum music played in the background as six girls listened intently to the music and their dance teacher. "Pineapple . . . coconut . . . pineapple . . . coconut. " Stacey Bundens' voice was like a metronome at Casa Dance Studio's Keiki (child) hula class: pineapple, bump to the left; coconut, bump to the right. Staring at her figure in the mirror, the girls followed their teacher, their hula skirts ruffling back and forth with their swaying hips. The 2,000-year-old dance form, which originated in what is now Hawaii, is alive in New Jersey and across the mainland.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2011
I HAVE ALWAYS admired hula, the traditional dance of the Polynesian people of Hawaii, for its beauty and smooth, fluid movements. It also looks like a lot of fun and a great way to get in a dance-style workout. To satisfy my curiosity about hula dancing, I turned to 25-year-old San Francisco native Janine Paat, a cultural anthropologist who lives in Philadelphia. She teaches hula and other dance-based exercise modems at studios around the area. The former Miss Philadelphia contestant studied dance anthropology at Bard College.
SPORTS
June 3, 2007 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are bobble heads, caps and T-shirts. There are backpacks, balls and bats. Every team in baseball has a handful of giveaways during the season, and most of them are routine. But today's is a little unusual. It's not every day a team has a giveaway with a player wearing a grass skirt. But this afternoon at Citizens Bank Park, the Phillies are handing out a Shane Victorino hula figurine to children 14 and under. Victorino is from Wailuku, Hawaii. Not many people from Hawaii come to find employment in Philadelphia, so we thought we'd ask Victorino a few questions about his home state.
NEWS
February 10, 2008 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Students dressed in sarongs with flowers behind one ear moved in unison across a dance floor while Polynesian music played in the background. Hips swiveled. Feet shifted, and eyes followed the sinuous motion of arms and hands. "Aloha," a girlish voice said. Could this be Hawaii? No, it was Narberth, the Little Honolulu of the suburbs. Connie Majka and Suzanne Aumack, devotees of Hawaiian dance and culture, opened the studio last fall to share their passion with the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1990 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Men in Love, like the similarly themed Longtime Companion, is a frequently touching chronicle about the shell shock, grief and panic greeting survivors of casualties in the AIDS wars. Comparing the two films is a lesson in cultural anthropology. The Manhattan-based Longtime Companion has as its characters a community of fast- track lawyers, scriptwriters and stockbrokers who summer on Fire Island and winter in Workaholia. Everyone is exceptionally gorgeous and defined by bank accounts.
NEWS
February 28, 1993 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Alfred Hobschaidt was certain his luck would change after a visit to the fortune teller. He held out his palm to Manoj the Fortuneteller, who scrutinized it and told him that if he played the slots, Hobschaidt would win enough chips to claim the prize he coveted - a red plastic hula hoop. "Now I'm on a lucky roll," Hobschaidt said as he swung his wheelchair around and headed toward the slot machine set up last weekend in the cafeteria of Cinnaminson High School for Casino Night.
TRAVEL
September 23, 2012 | By Audrey McAvoy, Associated Press
HONOLULU - Walk along the shops in Waikiki and it isn't hard to come across vendors selling knickknacks of a fake Hawaii. No, the Aloha State doesn't have wild monkeys or parrots. Lei aren't plastic and don't cost 99 cents - they're supposed to be made of real flowers. Here are some other symbols that have become associated with Hawaii that aren't, well, Hawaiian.   Tiki bars Two California restaurants, Trader Vic's and Don the Beachcomber, started the tiki bar phenomenon in the 1930s.
NEWS
March 9, 1988 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Staff Writer
When I walked into the restaurant, the first thing I saw was a 5-year-old doing the hula. She was followed by an Hawaiian fire eater. He was followed by three male patrons who rolled up their pants and proceeded to look absolutely absurd while they took hula lessons. Welcome to the Middle East. Middle East? Don't try to put logic into it. I stopped trying to figure out Jimmy Tayoun, councilman, co-owner and human dynamo, a long time ago. This week the Middle East restaurant celebrates its 30th birthday (Address: 126 Chestnut St., Phone: 922-1003)
NEWS
August 24, 1998 | By Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Raymond Alvarez and Lizette Ortiz knew something was wrong when they arrived at Hunting Park yesterday and didn't see many people. The hill where a wide stage should have been set up was empty. In the dunk tanks, there was no water. They could have dwelled on the organizational setbacks, but they had the children to think about. The Festival del Nino Boricua, the Puerto Rican Children's Festival, had to go on, one way or another. "We've been let down by everyone today. The children shouldn't lose, too," said Ortiz, the vice president of National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, which sponsors the festival.
NEWS
July 15, 1996 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sure, it was interesting to hear that there are ten thousand trillion ants on earth, that they weigh as much as all the planet's human beings, that they drag away 90 percent of the insect corpses that fall to the floor of the rain forest. But what really raised the eyebrows of nine children gathered in a field at sunset in the Saunders Woods nature reserve was the news that whenever you see ants visiting your sugar bowl or patrolling your peonies, they are all female. Ben Shaw, 7, looked up from under the brim of his red Phillies cap and asked Lower Merion Conservancy director Mike Weilbacher to say that one more time: "All of them are female?"
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NEWS
June 2, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia dropped a beach - and the beat - on Festival Pier on Saturday for the seventh annual Roots Picnic. The pier, blanketed in sand, with a boardwalk running between two riverfront stages and the smell of marijuana and suntan lotion in the air, drew more than 6,000 for the sold-out show. The concert, along with a Friday show, kicked off the summer music season at the river. While many enjoyed the beach feel (complete with Calypso band and man-made sand dunes along the Delaware)
NEWS
May 27, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Jam on the River, a music festival that's been cheered, changed, merged, and abandoned, returned triumphantly to Penn's Landing on Sunday. This time it was reincarnated as - of course! - an electronic dance party. The come-and-go history of the event made no difference to hundreds of fans who came to hear bands such as GRiZ, Conspirator, Zoogma, Grimace Federation, and the headliner, Lotus. It was a crowd mostly in its 20s that exuded a peace-and-love vibe, where clothes the color of the rainbow were standard, and dozens of people moved to the music accompanied by a throw-back accessory: the hula hoop.
TRAVEL
September 23, 2012 | By Audrey McAvoy, Associated Press
HONOLULU - Walk along the shops in Waikiki and it isn't hard to come across vendors selling knickknacks of a fake Hawaii. No, the Aloha State doesn't have wild monkeys or parrots. Lei aren't plastic and don't cost 99 cents - they're supposed to be made of real flowers. Here are some other symbols that have become associated with Hawaii that aren't, well, Hawaiian.   Tiki bars Two California restaurants, Trader Vic's and Don the Beachcomber, started the tiki bar phenomenon in the 1930s.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Back in 1981, when Connie Majka went on a Hawaiian vacation with her mother, she packed some predictable baggage. "I expected a Wildwood with palm trees. I'd seen the Elvis Presley movies," she recalls. "It looked fun. " Fun it was, and also life-changing. For it was on that trip that Majka saw her first native Hawaiian hula dancer, a large woman who performed with such grace, "she seemed to be floating on air. I knew instantly: I want to do that. " In the years since, Majka has studied hula and the Hawaiian culture both there and here.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Visitors lined up well before Saturday's private preview of the Philadelphia International Flower Show, clogging two lobbies of the Convention Center and snaking out the doors and down Arch Street. Like so many plant groupies, they surged through the doors at noon, into Hawaii: Islands of Aloha , which opens to the public Sunday and runs through next Sunday. "Looks like Vegas," one man remarked as he stood under the "orchid wave" that greets visitors at the show. It is a stylized, wavelike structure that is covered with hundreds of white orchids.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Against a backdrop of colorful leis, table orchids, and hula dancers, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society launched the 2012 flower show Thursday morning: "Hawaii: Islands of Aloha" opens to the public March 4 and runs till March 11 at the Convention Center, 12th and Market Streets. "This is a show like you've never seen before," said horticultural society president Drew Becher, who outlined new features of the 183-year-old event, officially known as the Philadelphia International Flower Show, before an enthusiastic crowd on the 33d floor of the Loews Philadelphia Hotel in Center City.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Against a backdrop of colorful leis, table orchids and hula dancers, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society kicked off the 2012 flower show this morning: "Hawaii: Islands of Aloha" opens to the public March 4 and runs till March 11 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, 12th and Market Streets. "This is a show like you've never seen before," said PHS President Drew Becher, who outlined new features of the 183-year-old event, officially known as the Philadelphia International Flower Show, before an enthusiastic crowd on the 33d floor of the Loews Philadelphia Hotel in Center City.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2011
I HAVE ALWAYS admired hula, the traditional dance of the Polynesian people of Hawaii, for its beauty and smooth, fluid movements. It also looks like a lot of fun and a great way to get in a dance-style workout. To satisfy my curiosity about hula dancing, I turned to 25-year-old San Francisco native Janine Paat, a cultural anthropologist who lives in Philadelphia. She teaches hula and other dance-based exercise modems at studios around the area. The former Miss Philadelphia contestant studied dance anthropology at Bard College.
LIVING
March 17, 2010 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ashley Ambirge, in a notice-me flame-red coat, is swiveling her hips wildly and laughing deliriously as she tries, with varying degrees of success, to hula-hoop. Passersby stare at the 25-year-old acting silly beyond her age - and in front of the stately Courthouse of West Chester, no less. "People think I'm an airhead," said Ambirge (AM-bur-zhay), well aware of the first impression she often makes, an image underlined by her stylish bob that sweeps across one eye, her bubbly laugh, and, of course, her antics.
LIVING
July 8, 2009 | By Natalie Pompilio FOR THE INQUIRER
Marisa Grasso is a hooper. The walls of her Northern Liberties home have scuff marks. Her art students have seen her do it between classes. Once in a while, she'll have a bruise on her legs or on her face after her hoop goes astray. "I used to think it was silly. Now I'm sold," said Grasso, 30. "It is such an incredible workout. " In the 1950s, the U.S. went through a hula-hooping craze that had everyone with hips - from kids in backyards to adults grooving at concerts - spinning plastic tubes around their waists.
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