CollectionsHuman Behavior
IN THE NEWS

Human Behavior

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 11, 1991
USING THE BOTTOM-UP APPROACH The focus of reform, whether we are talking about the law, health care or education, has increasingly been "the system," rather than behavior. Instead of adopting a "bottom-up," approach - dealing with real problems that arise out of human behavior and real people's lives, people who are interested in change are frequently devoting their attention to the system - a "top-down," approach, as if somehow once you change the system the result will be better.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1995 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You can't beat Bjork. In the category of one-named wonders who imbue state-of-the-art dance music with a human touch - think Moby, Tricky, the Orb - the mischievous Icelandic imp is tops. On Wednesday at a sold-out Trocadero (where the heat wave never abates), the former leader of the Sugarcubes came on like the Cocteau Twins and Tom Waits meeting in a smoke-filled saloon with accordions and electronic beats co-existing in pleasing disquietude. Outfitted in a simple white dress and red sneaks, Bjork (last name: Gudmundsdottir)
NEWS
May 4, 1998 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Emily Hartshorne Mudd, 99, a nationally recognized family planning and marital therapy pioneer, champion of women's rights, and founder of the Marriage Council of Philadelphia, died Saturday at her home in Haverford. Mrs. Mudd was credited by one historian with playing "a role in the development of marriage counseling in the United States analogous to that played by [Margaret] Sanger's Clinical Research Bureau in contraception. " Sex researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson, with whom she had worked for many years, once said of her: "More than anyone else, Emily Mudd encouraged and helped shape the field of marriage and family-life education, and was among the first to address the dimension of sexuality as a vital factor in family-life care.
NEWS
April 11, 1994 | BY GERALD K. MCOSCAR
America's legal system is in desperate need of reform, but reform moves at a glacial pace, its progress hampered by special interests, ingrained and archaic habits and lazy and fainthearted judges. But just as crime control need not depend on gun control, court reform need not depend on the good graces of the obstructionists. One such reform is to loosen the stranglehold the mental-health industry has on the courts. Counselors, therapists, psychologists and psychiatrists of widely varying degrees of competency, skill and legitimacy have burrowed their way into courthouses across the land, where they clog the arteries of justice while adding to its expense and undermining its foundations.
FOOD
November 15, 1992 | By Bob Kasper, FOR THE INQUIRER
Of all the ways to figure out what Americans are eating, William Rathje has the most straightforward. He looks in the trash. For the last 19 years, Rathje, an archaeologist and professor of anthropology at the University of Arizona in Tucson, has sorted through household refuse. By studying trash in Arizona, California and Wisconsin, he has learned to detect evidence of Brussels sprouts consumption by spotting the telltale leftover leaves. He has learned that frozen garbage is less aromatic and therefore easier to study than room-temperature refuse.
NEWS
October 3, 1997 | by Julie Knipe Brown, Daily News Staff Writer
It's 10 p.m. Do you know where your children are? Are they tucked safely in their beds, dreaming of scoring their next field goal? Or, are they glued to their personal computers, planning on scoring a tryst with a buxom blonde named Trixie? The latest revelations about a 15-year-old's obsession with his computer - and whether it led to a homosexual relationship with a man he met in an Internet chat room - has raised anew the debate about whether on-line sex chat and pornography lead to off-line rape and murder.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1993 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
It all began at a party, says Rob Becker. The discussion (initiated, of course, by the women) got around to the question of why men are such . . . well, such a body part beginning with the letter "a" (and we're not talking arms). The discussion resolved nothing since, as usual in talks of this nature, the men and women couldn't even agree that men are indeed (to be euphemistic) jerks. But the incident got Becker thinking about why men and women are different, and that evening he had a dream and an epiphany of sorts.
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
President John F. Kennedy's death is a fact. The who, why and how of his assassination is an interpretation of history. That is the opinion of Paul Sanborn, historian, military analyst and a teacher at Devon Preparatory School, where the Kennedy assassination is the theme of a senior seminar class Sanborn designed to help students understand how people, places and events become history. "History is not 'Kennedy was shot.' That's a fact," Sanborn said. "History is an interpretation of human behavior.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theatergoers who see Italian American Reconciliation will not be surprised to learn that the playwright, John Patrick Shanley, won an Academy Award for writing the script of the movie Moonstruck. The similarities between the play, now at Foundation Theater in Pemberton, and the movie are striking. Both are set in New York City's Italian-American community; their subject - love - is the same; the characters talk and act pretty much alike, and an outdoor, nighttime scene figures prominently in both.
NEWS
October 7, 1996 | By Marianne Williamson
There is an important distinction to be made between a religiously based vs. a spiritually based political impulse. While religion is a force that either creatively or noncreatively separates us, spirituality is a force that unites us by reminding us of our fundamental oneness. The religionization of American politics is dangerous; the spiritualization of our political consciousness is imperative. When violence erupted last week over the Israeli opening of a tunnel near the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, the clear difference between religious passion and spiritual passion was obvious.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2011
ARIES (March 21-April 19). Crack down on self-discipline. The more leeway you give yourself the further from your goals you will stray. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Avoid making assumptions about another person - you're not likely to assume the right thing. Instead, ask questions, even if it means you risk looking foolish. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You see the light at the end of the tunnel, and you keep going toward it because you know it's the right way. CANCER (June 22-July 22)
NEWS
January 31, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Little Prince - beloved by many over the course of its 67 years - is a gentle, sweet fantasy that magnifies human behavior through the lens of existentialism. It's filled with metaphors, with many adult characters who represent some aspect of the human condition. The original story by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry seems made for puppetry, as a new version with actors and puppets clearly demonstrates, in a technically pumped but strangely distant production at Bristol Riverside Theatre.
NEWS
December 11, 2009 | By CHRISTINE FLOWERS
IT'S been an interesting couple of weeks, so here's a roundup of my thoughts on a whole bunch of those stories. S. Philly High mess Asian students are targeted at a Philadelphia public high school by African-American classmates. Some people tried to minimize the violence by pointing out that, in some cases, the Asians allegedly started the fights. So that somehow justifies one group of kids roaming from classroom to classroom, as widely reported, looking for random kids of another ethnicity to hurt?
NEWS
January 21, 2009
WAS IT REALLY a miracle when Flight 1549 landed in the Hudson, with no fatalities and only minor injuries? I don't wish to be disrespectful toward people of faith, but if a deity were really in charge, why would he allow bird strikes to knock out both of the plane's engines in the first place? Fact is, we live in a world where bad things can happen. But humankind understands this. So, instead of depending on a deity who, if he/she/it exits at all is mercurial at best, we have to be prepared.
NEWS
November 20, 2007 | By Carol Suplee
Depending on whom you talk to in New Jersey, you can hear any of the following opinions on the controversial issue of our black bear population: The number of black bears is increasing rapidly, and so is the potential for dangerous human-bear confrontations. The bear population is stable and conflicts have decreased. There is an urgent need for a trophy bear hunt to manage the black bear population. There is no need for such a hunt. It's a face-off: animal rights groups call it slaughter, hunters call it wildlife management.
NEWS
April 10, 2006 | By ROTAN LEE
THE STEREOTYPE of staid British pomp quickly evaporated during my interview with David Miliband, a member of the British parliament and minister of communities and local government who is likely to play a large role in any post-Tony Blair Labor government. Philadelphia was the third stop on Miliband's official five-day, five-city tour to view urbanization, urban policy, leadership and economic development from several municipal perspectives. The cities he visited offered important variety: the limited municipal powers in the nation's capital, Baltimore and Philadelphia's old-style politics, Miami-Dade, Fla.,'s two-tier mayoralty, Toronto's amalgamated metropolis.
NEWS
May 8, 2005 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
People fleeing the World Trade Center towers on Sept. 11, 2001, for the most part did not run. They took, on average, six minutes to decide to leave. Some even retrieved personal items before evacuating. For some, taking their time proved fatal. Those findings, announced in a recent federal government report on the towers' collapse, have renewed focus on a poorly understood aspect of emergencies: human behavior. Despite millennia of fires, floods and other disasters, engineers and other safety scientists know relatively little about the workings of the human brain in times of peril.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2004 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
All through World War II, the Allies saw themselves in a desperate race with Nazi Germany to develop the atom bomb, but after the war it was learned that German scientists had not even managed to sustain a nuclear reaction, something the Allies had done as early as 1943. Why was Germany, so advanced in rocket and jet plane technology, so far behind in developing the mightiest weapon of all? That is the question that lies at the heart of Copenhagen, the erudite, eloquent, perceptively human play by Michael Frayn.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Screwtape, the title character of C.S. Lewis' novel, The Screwtape Letters, is a devil. In a program note to the Lantern Theater Production of actor Tony Lawton's stage adaptation, Lawton asks the question "Do devils exist?" and answers it by saying he doesn't care and surmises that Lewis didn't care either. Lawton goes on to say that the existence of devils is not important to The Screwtape Letters, and he seems to be correct. The devil as an evil agent influencing human behavior is merely a device that Lewis, a noted Christian apologist of the first half of the 20th century, uses to illustrate how humans, by design and accident, can stray from the path of Christian virtue.
NEWS
February 6, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Humans, torn between conflicting impulses to conquer their surroundings and to save their planet, are at a historic turning point, Harvard naturalist and author Edward O. Wilson says. Earth is undergoing the most catastrophic mass extinction since an asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, Wilson says, and if current trends continue, 20 percent of the species alive today could be gone by 2030. The ecological death march could be stopped by focusing preservation efforts on the most diverse enclaves and by spending $30 billion a year to do so, Wilson said in an interview.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|