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Human Error

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NEWS
January 15, 2003 | By Crispin Sartwell
The calls have been, as the saying goes, questionable. In San Francisco, the New York Giants lost a playoff game when, after a bad snap on the last play of the game, a field goal attempt, the holder improvised a pass. The Giants were called for an illegal man downfield, and the game was over. As the NFL acknowledged, there should also have been a pass interference call against the San Francisco 49ers, and the down should have been replayed. In Nashville, in sudden death overtime, the Tennessee Titans missed a field goal.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | By Stephen Keating, Special to The Inquirer
Operator error has been cited for the release Feb. 17 of a thick black cloud of smoke from Gloucester County's new trash incinerator in West Deptford Township. The 10-minute emission bypassed the facility's pollution scrubbers and followed both mechanical and human failures, said Kevin Stickney, a spokesman for Wheelabrator Inc. of Danvers, Mass., operator of the incinerator. A report on the content and possible health effects of the emission will not be available until later this week, said Jeanine Mosley, a spokeswoman with the state Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
July 25, 2014
WHEN DEBORAH Stagg saw the $11,828.18 bill from Philadelphia Gas Works, "I think I was speechless," she says. Then, she was curious and, finally, something close to furious. In a July 10 letter to Stagg, PGW said her meter had been recording only half her usage for years, but it would bill her for only the past four years. "There is no way they can bill me for four years," she said to herself, but she was wrong about that. Four years is the back-billing limit established by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission.
NEWS
January 28, 2009 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Human error is likely the cause of a SEPTA train accident yesterday that sent nine people to the hospital and delayed commuters for much of the morning, SEPTA spokesman Richard Maloney said. A southbound work train struck the rear of a stopped R1 Airport train about 4:40 a.m. just southwest of 10th and Wagner Streets, near the Fern Rock station. Five crew members were on the work train, and 16 passengers and two crew members were on the commuter train. All the injured - four on the work train and five on the commuter train - were treated at Albert Einstein Medical Center.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1987 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
Human error was responsible for the pre-Christmas computer problem at Philadelphia National Bank that prevented proper posting of automatic deposits and withdrawals for about 9,000 customers, according to bank officials. A programmer handling a routine procedure inadvertently entered incorrect data and caused the computer to fail to post $6 million, mostly in automatic payroll deposits, to customer accounts, according to Bob Gilmore, executive vice president of CoreStates Financial Corp.
NEWS
June 4, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A British Airways jumbo jet and a Scandinavian Airlines System jet nearly collided over this Atlantic island, and an Icelandic air-control official said yesterday that human error was at fault. Peter Einarsson, head of Icelandic Air Control, said that "a series of human mistakes" led to the planes' passing within about 200 feet of each other Monday. Almost 600 people were aboard the two planes. SAS spokeswoman Monika Backlund said in Stockholm that the British Airways Boeing 747 and the Scandinavian DC-8 were flying in the same air corridor at the same altitude - 33,000 feet - over southwestern Iceland.
NEWS
November 21, 1987 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
Fifteen employees of Mercy Catholic Medical Center's Fitzgerald Division in Darby were either suspended or placed on probation yesterday following recent revelations of three accidental deaths of patients this year. The disciplinary action, taken in response to two of the deaths, was one of several steps announced by chief executive officer Plato Marinakos yesterday in an attempt to bolster public confidence in the Delaware County hospital. Marinakos said 10 of those disciplined were pharmacists or their assistants involved in the death of 5-month-old Tyhisha Smith of West Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 27, 1998 | By Juan C. Rodriguez, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Registered voters in at least three voting districts in Moorestown and Florence Township were mailed the wrong sample ballots due to malfunctioning equipment at a printing plant, Burlington County Clerk Michael Conda said yesterday. The county's sample ballots were mailed out a week ago, but Conda said he did not get word until yesterday that voter information had been mixed up. Residents in at least two Moorestown districts were mailed Pemberton Township ballots, and voters in at least one Florence Township district got Medford's sample ballot, Conda said.
NEWS
January 5, 1995 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
The city Department of Licenses and Inspections thinks it has finally gotten to the bottom of what caused a Cottman Avenue rowhouse to collapse and apparently damage seven other dwellings five weeks ago. An L&I report distributed to residents in the 3300 block of Cottman Avenue last night blamed the collapse on an engineering blunder by a contractor who was repairing damage left after the house next door collapsed in July. The contractor dug a trench too close to the stone foundation wall at 3321 Cottman Ave., triggering the collapse of that building, wrote Albert Tantala, a private engineer hired by the city.
NEWS
July 2, 2006 | By Larry King and Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Human error appears to have been the likeliest cause of a rare, head-on crash yesterday between two SEPTA Regional Rail trains traveling through a Montgomery County neighborhood. There appeared to have been no mechanical or signal failures behind the mid-afternoon crash that injured about 30 people in Abington Township, SEPTA spokesman Richard Maloney said. Most of the injuries were described as minor; none appeared to be life-threatening. The four-car trains crashed shortly before 3 p.m. on a single-track section of the R2 Warminster line, between the Roslyn and Crestmont Stations.
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NEWS
July 25, 2014
WHEN DEBORAH Stagg saw the $11,828.18 bill from Philadelphia Gas Works, "I think I was speechless," she says. Then, she was curious and, finally, something close to furious. In a July 10 letter to Stagg, PGW said her meter had been recording only half her usage for years, but it would bill her for only the past four years. "There is no way they can bill me for four years," she said to herself, but she was wrong about that. Four years is the back-billing limit established by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission.
NEWS
March 25, 2013 | By Kelli Kennedy, Associated Press
MIAMI - Two skydivers died during weekend jumps at a popular Florida, and the co-owner of the facility said Sunday that they did not deploy their main parachutes. Deputies found the bodies of the skydiving instructor and a student, both from Iceland, on Saturday after the two didn't return from a jump with a group, setting off an hours-long air and ground search around the site in Zephyrhills, about 30 miles northeast of Tampa. Pasco County sheriff's authorities identified the victims as instructor Orvar Arnarson, 41, and student Andrimar Pordarson, 25. The men jumped separately, not in tandem.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum and Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writers
The freight train derailment last week in Paulsboro likely was the result of human mistakes (overriding a red stop signal), money-saving automation (replacing a human bridge operator with an electronic system), and overloaded old infrastructure (a bridge with parts dating to 1873), rail experts say. The bridge failure and derailment Friday dumped four tank cars into the Mantua Creek, one of which ruptured, spewing hazardous vinyl chloride gas into the air. Seventy people went to hospitals, and more than 100 residents are expected to remain out of their homes this week while crews try to remove the dangerous chemical.
SPORTS
June 13, 2012 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Columnist
The Wampum Walloper, aka Dick Allen, and other members of the 1972 White Sox will be honored by the Chicago Baseball Museum on June 25 at a fundraising dinner at U.S. Cellular Field. Allen played only three seasons with the White Sox but is immensely popular in Chicago and loves the city enough to say he wished he had spent his entire career there. The slugger who had electrified Philadelphia eight years earlier lit up the American League in his first season with the Sox in '72. He led the league with 37 homers, a career-high 113 RBI and 99 walks.
SPORTS
June 11, 2012
BALTIMORE - The Phillies made mistakes in the field and compounded those problems by hitting into a total of four inning-ending double plays during the 6-4, 12-inning loss the Baltimore Orioles pinned on them Saturday. They fully earned this defeat. No excuses were offered by manager Charlie Manuel or any of his players after the team's seventh loss in eight games pushed them a season-high seven games behind the first-place Washington Nationals. "We could have shut them out," Manuel said, lamenting his team's poor defensive performance, a few minutes after Adam Jones launched a two-run home run that gave the Orioles a victory and reliever B.J. Rosenberg a loss in his major-league debut.
SPORTS
November 29, 2011 | BY MIKE KERN, kernm@phillynews.com
VILLANOVA'S basketball team - which has no seniors and five freshmen - is 4-2, after losing two of three in the 76 Classic in Anaheim, Calif. The losses were to Saint Louis (6-0) by 12 points in the second round on Friday and by one to Santa Clara (4-2) in Sunday's third-place game. But it was the way they went down against Steve Nash's alma mater that caused some head-shaking. The Wildcats, after trailing by eight three times in the first half, went ahead by nine with 3 1/2 minutes left.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2011 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
My daughter was nearly 2 when her first full sentence - its syntax disheveled but the meaning clear - tumbled from her lips. We were expecting company that night, a group of friends with whom we'd been sharing weekly dinners since before Sasha was born. "Friends come house Sasha now?" she queried. And while her words may have sounded like a clumsy translation from a Far Eastern language, I cherished them as a scrap of found poetry. Oh yes, my sweet; friends come house Sasha any minute now. I miss those toddler days, with their unpredictable kinks of speech.
NEWS
May 14, 2011 | By MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com 215-854-5949
The investigation into the police department's bad-data-spewing Breathalyzer machines has found that 2,126 drunken-driving cases were affected, with 1,459 of those defendants able to request new trials, the district attorney announced yesterday. "This was an unfortunate case of human error," Philadelphia D.A. Seth Williams said in a statement. "But we identified it and have started the process of correcting any mistakes that were made. And the hardworking members of my office . . . have put in countless hours to make sure this doesn't happen again," added Williams, whose office conducted a six-week investigation.
NEWS
April 4, 2011
AS A RECOVERING career criminal, I no longer choose a life of crime. And as a mentor to troubled youth, I let them know that the difference between spending your life in a jail cell or on a college campus (or in a reputable profession) is one bad decision. I encourage the youth with alternatives to a criminal lifestyle and prison by first thinking about the benefits and consequences of their actions before they act, and seeking a college education, or at least some type of vocation. So why is the governor encouraging the youth of Pennsylvania with his 50 percent cut in state support for higher education?
NEWS
February 25, 2010 | By REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
If the three bomb-sniffing pooches who failed an annual recertification test last year at the airport could talk, they would probably say, "Don't blame me. " It was not the dogs who fumbled their assignment, it was their handlers, said U.S. Rep. Bob Brady yesterday. The handlers were not properly trained, said Brady, who faulted the Transportation Security Administration for the personnel issue and for the agency's lack of communication with officials of Philadelphia International Airport.
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